Consider what Stormy does to make a living

first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion After viewing the interview of Stormy Daniels by Anderson Cooper on “60 Minutes,” I was shaking my head trying to understand what I had just seen. It reminded me of the ridiculousness of Sen. Orin Hatch grilling Clarence Thomas during his confirmation hearings talking about Long John Dong.This entire situation is entirely out of context. There should have been images all over the set of what she does for a living, albeit with a lot of black censor marks to cover up the images. Then we would have a better idea of what we are dealing with than some “poor me” dumbstruck blonde who is the victim of being taken advantage of by a big bad lawyer and his rich client.  Quite frankly it was like one boob asking another boob stupid questions about consenting adults having sex. Has 60 Minutes gone to the level of Jerry Springer?I’m going out on a limb here because I believe most people have no idea what goes on in the porn, oops, adult entertainment industry. It can be quite overwhelming to an individual experiencing it for the first time on DVD or the Internet. Having been in the video rental business for 24 years, and yes, we rented adult video movies, I know firsthand all about the business. First and foremost, it’s a money-making industry. If anyone on their right mind doesn’t believe that Stormy Daniels isn’t looking for a larger payday, then we weren’t watching the same interview.Do any of us really believe that a man, yes of the Donald Trump stature and reputation, could resist the temptation being alone in a hotel suite with a porn star? Oops, I meant to say adult film actress.Bob BeliveGlenvilleMore from The Daily Gazette:Foss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristslast_img read more

Two in line for £60m Civil Service PFI plan

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Frogmore leaps into the Bristol Harbourside fray

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Development on the crawl

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Personal space invaders

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Norman Wisdom

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More action needed if rail freight is to meet its expansion targets

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Gambling heads to Blackpool

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Virus-free Indonesia more threatened by COVID-19 than Singapore, Malaysia: Survey

first_imgThe report revealed that respondents living in the Asia-Pacific region — where most of the coronavirus cases are recorded — had expressed a higher level of anxiety over the epidemic in general than any other region in the world.In the Middle East, for instance, Saudi Arabia ranks first (66 percent) in terms of viewing the virus as a huge threat, followed by Kuwait (60 percent) and the United Arab Emirates (56 percent).The survey also finds that people in some countries of Europe and the United States are less threatened by the virus than any other people in the Asia Pacific and the Middle East. For instance, only 27 percent of respondents in the United States, 23 percent in the United Kingdom and 19 percent in Germany think of the COVID-19 as a major threat to their home countries. As of Tuesday, more than a month since the virus has spread globally and infected more than 70,000 people worldwide, Indonesian authorities still claim that the country has zero coronavirus infections on its soil, though at least four Indonesian nationals have been reported to have contracted the virus abroad. Foreign Minister Retno LP Marsudi confirmed on Tuesday that three Indonesian crew members aboard the quarantined Diamond Princess cruise ship anchored off the coast of Japan had tested positive for COVID-19. Earlier this month, an Indonesian woman working in Singapore was tested positive of the virus and has been under intensive care at the Singapore General Hospital.At least 102 specimens tested by the Health Ministry in Indonesia have been declared negative of the Wuhan coronavirus so far. Topics : Conducted from Jan. 31 to Feb. 11, the survey found that 72 percent of respondents in the archipelago considered COVID-19 a “major threat” to public health, despite Indonesia having no confirmed cases of the disease so far.Mainland China — home to the outbreak’s epicenter, Wuhan city in Hubei province — ranks first on the index, with 77 percent of its citizens viewing the virus as a huge threat to their homeland.In terms of viewing the virus as “major threat” at home, Indonesia ranked first among Southeast Asian countries surveyed, including Thailand (71 percent), the Philippines (70 percent), Malaysia (62 percent) and Singapore (58 percent), all of which have recorded coronavirus cases.The study also found that 84 percent of Indonesians believe the virus poses “a major threat to public health anywhere in the world” — more than any other citizens of surveyed countries, including China, where only 69 percent of the people think so.  Indonesians are more anxious about COVID-19 — a disease brought on by the fast-spreading Wuhan coronavirus — than their regional neighbors, according to a recent survey by global public opinion and data company YouGov.The international study, which surveyed some 27,000 people in 23 countries and regions, measures the level of coronavirus concerns across the globe.Indonesia ranked second after China as the country most concerned about the deadly outbreak, which has killed more than 1,800 globally.last_img read more

North Korea’s Kim sends ‘get well soon’ wishes for South’s coronavirus battle

first_imgNorth Korean leader Kim Jong Un has sent a letter expressing hope for South Korea to overcome a coronavirus outbreak, President Moon Jae-in’s office said on Thursday, as the South battles the biggest epidemic of the disease outside China.The two sides’ exchanges have ground nearly to a halt after the North closed borders and temporarily shut a joint liaison office in a border city to avert an outbreak, while the South added 438 infections on Thursday to swell its tally to 5,766.In the letter delivered on Wednesday, Kim voiced concern over Moon’s health, and expounded what he described as his “honest view and position” regarding the situation on the Korean peninsula, Moon’s office said, without elaborating. North Korea had resumed missile testing on Monday after a three-month pause, prompting Moon’s office to urge a halt.Kim Yo Jong, who is also a senior official of the North’s ruling party, said the exercise was not meant to threaten anyone, deriding Seoul for what she called “perfectly foolish” words and acts.North Korea has not confirmed any virus infections, but state media said people showing symptoms faced a month in quarantine, while further “high-intensity” measures included stricter checks in border areas, at airports and sea ports.Moon offered to help the North’s prevention efforts, but Pyongyang has not responded, officials said.Topics : “Chairman Kim wished to console our citizens who are fighting the coronavirus,” Yoon Do-han, Moon’s senior press secretary, told reporters.”He said he believes we will win, and hoped the health of southern compatriots will be protected.”Moon responded with a letter of thanks, Yoon added.The rare message came less than two days after Kim’s sister, Yo Jong, issued a statement attacking Moon’s office for criticizing a military drill by the North.last_img read more