Grieving Dolphin Captured on Video Carrying Dead Calf in Florida Waters

first_imgStay on target Watch: Dolphin Leaps Feet Away From Unsuspecting SurferWatch: Orcas Hunt, Kill Dolphins Next to Whale Watching Boat Footage captured in Florida appears to show a grieving dolphin carrying and pushing her dead calf through the waters.(WARNING: The video may be disturbing to some viewers)The See Through Canoe company shared video of the heartbreaking scene, spotted in the intracoastal waterway in Indian Shores, Florida, on Twitter Monday.Mother #dolphin not ready to let go of her dead calf and pushing it through the intracoastal waterway.It’s hard to say for sure without examination, but the calf may have been hit by a boat. Please don’t assume that because #dolphins are fast that you won’t hit them. #sad pic.twitter.com/Le2MAwvPIB— See Through Canoe (@SeeThroughCanoe) June 3, 2019“Mother dolphin not ready to let go of her dead calf and pushing it through the intracoastal waterway,” See Through Canoe’s tweet said.The company said that the calf may have been struck by a boat. “Please don’t assume that because dolphins are fast that you won’t hit them.”Scientists have long tried to get a handle on grief-like behavior to determine if cetaceans — dolphins and whales — really do experience the emotion.Accounts of whales and dolphins caring for or attending dead or dying individuals have been reported since the 1950s, and are observed by cetacean watchers and researchers worldwide, according to Cosmos magazine.A 2018 study published in Zoology suggests that this behavior exhibited by a female dolphin carrying its deceased calf around for days (sometimes until the body is in such a state of decomposition that only the head or part of the body remains) is evidence that dolphins grieve for their dead.An earlier study, conducted in 2015, also showed that Atlantic spotted dolphins seemed to show grieving behaviors for several minutes or sometimes hours after the death of a calf. “Species that live in a matrilineal system, species that live in pods of related individuals, such as pilot whales whose pods can comprise up to four generations of animals — when they spend a lifetime together, sometimes 60 years or more, yes, I believe they can grieve,” said the study’s lead author, Filipe Alves of the University of Porto, Portugal.More on Geek.com:Watch: Humpback Whales Swim With Dolphins Off Irish CoastPacific White-Sided Dolphin at Chicago Aquarium Is Pregnant — Here’s the UltrasoundBaby Dolphin Stranded on Florida Beach Had Belly Full of Plastic Trashlast_img

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