Chelsea to outbid Man Utd to land winger – report

first_imgChelsea are ready to outbid Manchester United to land Belgian winger Eden Hazard, The Daily Telegraph report.The Blues are favourites to sign Hazard from Lille, with United said to be reluctant to pay the £35m asking price. Manchester City, who have also shown an interest, apparently have reservations about his wage demands.Hazard is expected to announce his future following Belgium’s friendly against England at Wembley next week.The Sun report Brazilian club Sao Paulo’s claim that Chelsea have made a £23m bid for 19-year-old midfielder Lucas Moura.The player’s adviser Wagner Ribeiro said: “He has the perfect profile to play in Europe. He’s a good player and knows how to shoot.”Meanwhile. QPR boss Mark Hughes wants Manchester City midfielder Nigel de Jong and Blackburn goalkeeper Paul Robinson, according to reports.Hughes was City’s manager when they signed De Jong, who is entering the final year of his contract at Eastlands.The Dutchman was only a substitute for his team’s last four matches of the season, which the Daily Mirror say has alerted Rangers to his possible availability.And the Daily Mail say Rangers and West Ham both want Robinson, who is tipped to leave Blackburn following their relegation.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Genes Attack the Trees

first_imgEvolutionary tree-building (11/14/2005) is a tangled business.  Now that scientists can compare genomes of diverse animals, they can compare the resulting molecular evolutionary trees with traditional ones – those produced by inferring relationships based on outward (morphological) characteristics of living or fossil organisms.  What happens when the trees don’t match?    Two recent studies, both reported by Science Daily, have demonstrated that molecular-based trees, to be believed, require uprooting long-standing morphologically-based evolutionary trees.Iguanas Promoted:  A “radical reorganization” of the tree of reptiles was reported by Science Daily based on work by two Penn State biologists.  Iguanas, for instance, had long been placed near the bottom of the tree due to their “primitive” appearance.  Now, the molecular tree graduates them to the top.  The new study compared 19 genomes from all the major reptile lineages.  So many anomalies were found, the researchers had to invent entirely new categories of classification.  In addition, most of the branches appeared to start early and remain relatively unchanged over vast periods of time.  Toxic venom, for example, was thought to be a recent innovation, but now appears rooted at the time of the earliest dinosaurs.  Reptiles with two egg teeth appear to precede those with one egg tooth – a step toward simplicity, not complexity.  These and other findings are inverting a family tree of reptiles accepted by evolutionary biologists for over a century.  One of the team members said, “If this new tree is correct, all the morphological characters that traditionally have been used to identify similarities between species will need to be reevaluated to understand how these traits evolved” (emphasis added in all quotes).Slow Humans:  Another startling finding reported in Science Daily started with the title, “Early Animals Had Human-Like Genes.”  If humans are the late-comers, why and how did early-Cambrian roundworms produce innovations that would persist unchanged for hundreds of millions of years?  The team compared human and fruit-fly introns with those of a roundworm thought to be 600 million years old, close to the period of the very first multicellular organisms.  Contrary to earlier expectations, introns – those spacers in the DNA cut out by the transcription machinery – were already present in the worms and have persisted all the way to the human line, while other branches, like insects, lost many of them quickly.  To save the evolutionary tree, researchers are speaking of “fast-evolving” and “slow-evolving” branches.  “The worm’s genes are very similar to human genes,” said one.  “That’s a much different picture than we’ve seen from the quickly-evolving species that have been studied so far.”  Another remarked, “Now we have direct evidence that genes were already quite complex in the first animals, and many invertebrates have reduced part of this complexity.”  Not only were the introns the same, but their positions within the genome “have been preserved over the last half a billion years.”Overall, the picture looks opposite what evolutionary biologists have expected: “this has shown us is that evolution is not always about gain; the loss of complexity can equally be an important player in evolution.”What’s most amazing about both these stories is not the genes.  It is the psychology of Darwinists.  They can hang on to a theory no matter how much contrary evidence comes to light.  Invented terms like “conserved genes” and “slow-evolving species” mask their desperation.  They are clinging to a dogmatic evolutionary position in spite of evidence that looks like creation: abrupt appearance, stasis, and loss of original complexity.  Simultaneously, they accuse creationists of accepting their view on “faith” while bluffing that “there is no controversy among scientists about evolution.”  Yet how would an impartial jury rule, based on the empirical evidence alone, with no evolutionary presuppositions?(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA words spice up OED

first_img7 October 2002What South African words would you include in an English dictionary designed for the region?There are words one hears every day in South Africa: ubuntu, for example, that Nguni word meaning humanity. There are lekgotla (Sesotho) and bosberaad (Afrikaans) – both strategy planning sessions, usually called by government or organisations.Some South African words have entered world usage – “fundi’, from the isiNdebele umfundi (an expert, a teacher) and “trek’, from South African Dutch (a long or arduous journey). Others, perhaps, deserve elevation into “World English’: babelaas (hung-over), from the isiZulu ibhabhalazi; and for those who get themselves into that state, dof, or stupid, from Afrikaans.The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary is the newest in a range of regional dictionaries – there are Canadian, Australian and Indian editions – and the editors had some difficult choices to make. They settled on 1 500 examples of South African English, including words specific to the country as well as those which have meanings in South Africa different from their definitions overseas.“Madam’, for example, might be “a polite form of address for a woman’ elsewhere, but here it’s “the mistress of a household, usually a white woman’, or “an affluent urban white woman’. A “bond’ in South Africa is a “mortgage’ in the US and the UK. And perhaps the best-known example: a South African “robot’ is not a steel-plated humanoid but a traffic light.Less known, but also important, is the use of the comma in figures. The second, South African usage entry under “comma’ is “a mark representing a decimal comma: two comma five metres’ – presumably where many other countries would say “point’.Choices were made by The Dictionary Unit for South African English, a not-for-profit unit affiliated to Rhodes University in Grahamstown and financed partly by the Pan South African Language Board, established by the South African Constitution to promote the country’s 11 official languages as well as other languages used in the country.The unit had a head start: set up in the 1960s by linguistic academics Jean and William Branford, it could rely on their 1978 Dictionary of South African English and the unit’s massive 1996 Dictionary of South African English on Historical Principles.The new dictionary is intended, say the publishers, for the average adult, the student and the professional. It veers from politics (Nepad, Black Consciousness, Gear) to food and drink (witblits, mebos, skottel) to agriculture – or, anyway, a particular crop. “Ganja’ was there already (origin: from Hindi gamja), but the South African edition has added dagga (origin: from Khoikhoi dachab) and “Durban poison’ (cannabis of a particularly potent variety, originating in KwaZulu-Natal, or so says the dictionary).The preference for Mandrax among South African substance abusers – more than in any other country – is also reflected in the dictionary, with one of the definitions of “button’ being “South African informal: a Mandrax tablet’.There is a nod to youth culture, or at least its music. There is nothing especially South African about hip hop (it is, says the dictionary, of US black and Hispanic origin) or rap (of US origin) or kwasa kwasa (“a lively erotic dance originating in central Africa’ as well as “a genre of popular African music’).But kwaito is distinctly home-grown. It is defined as “a style of popular dance music featuring rhythmically recited vocals over an instrumental backing with strong bass lines’. So now you know – and the origin of the name, if not the style, goes deep into Johannesburg culture. “Kwaito’, says the dictionary, comes from the Amakwaito, a group of 1950s gangsters in Sophiatown – and they, in turn, derived their name from an Afrikaans word for angry or vicious: kwaai.Traditional South African culture is highlighted in the new dictionary, with many words from official languages, especially Nguni, included. An imbizo – traditionally “a gathering called by a traditional leader’ but also “a meeting or workshop’ – comes from the isiZulu biza, “call, summon’.Makoti is in (“a young married woman, a bride’, from isiZulu), and indoda (“a man, especially one who has undergone traditional initiation’, from isiXhosa and isiZulu). So are imbongi (a praise singer) and inyanga (“a traditional healer who uses herbal remedies. Compare with sangoma’), as well as sangoma (“a traditional healer or diviner, from isangoma‘).And traditional culture of a different kind is included as well, with many words from Afrikaans, among them deurmekaar (“confused, disorganised’ – like many words, rather more evocative in original than in translation), boeremusiek and boerekos, and everybody’s favourite, lekker, which the dictionary helpfully defines as “tipsy’ as well as “good’ and “pleasant’.Anyone seeking an illustration of the interweaving and interdependency of different South African cultures need look no further than the language.Tsotsitaal, for example, is “an Afrikaans-influenced township patois . typically spoken in Gauteng. Origin from tsotsi + Afrikaans taal ‘language”). And the word tsotsi? It’s “a black urban criminal’, says the entry, and its origin is “perhaps a Sesotho corruption of zoot suit, with reference to the flashy clothes originally associated with tsotsis’. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Global airline profits to fall in 2017 as oil costs rise

first_imgThe International Air Transport Association is predicting global airline profits will fall 16 per cent next year amid higher oil prices and slower global traffic growth.Next year will also see almost 4 billion travellers to take to the air and 55.7 million tonnes of cargo transported as the industry accounts for almost 1 per cent of global GDP. An IATA global forecast released on Thursday predicts 2017  will see global profits slide to  $US29.8 billion, or $US7.54 per passenger,  after reaching a cyclical peak this year of $US35.6 billion.It also lowered its 2016 profit estimates from a June estimate of $US39.4 billion due to lower global GDP growth and rising costs., although they remain slightly ahead of 2015’s figure of $US35.3 billion. Nonetheless, this was still the highest absolute profit generated by the airline industry and the highest net profit margin of 5.1 per cent.IATA director general Alexandre de Juniac said the industry continued to deliver strong results, although what were record profits for airlines were considered normal for most other businesses.“Even though conditions in 2017 will be more difficult with rising oil prices, we see the industry earning $29.8 billion,’’ de Juniac said. “That’s a very soft landing and safely in profitable territory. These three years are the best performance in the industry’s history—irrespective of the many uncertainties we face. Indeed, risks are abundant— political, economic and security among them.’’Next year’s profit is expected to be hit by a rise in oil prices from an average this year of  $US44.60 a barrel to $US55. This will push up jet fuel prices from $US52.10 per barrel to $US64.90.IATA’s forecast noted that while this will account for almost 19 per cent of the industry’s cost structure next year,  it will still be less than the average of 33.2 per cent in 2012-13. One impact of the higher prices will be a slowing in traffic growth from 5.9 per cent this year to 5.1 per cent next year.  Although capacity growth will also slow, industry load factors are expected to fall from 80.2 percent this year to 79.8 per cent.“The negative impact of a lower load factor is expected to be offset somewhat by a strengthening of global economic growth, ‘’ IATA said in its analysis. “ World GDP is projected to expand by 2.5 per cent in 2017 (up from 2.2 per cent in 2016).“Along with structural changes in the industry, this is expected to help stabilize yields for both the cargo and passenger businesses. This is a welcome development as yields (calculated in dollar terms) have fallen each year since 2012.’’Industry consolidation means North American carriers are expected to remain the most profitable with net profits of $US18.1 billion, down from $US20.3 billion this year. They will also have the strongest net margin of 8.5 per cent and the highest average profit per passenger of $US19.58. Capacity next year is expected to grow by 2.6 percent compared to demand growth of 2.5 per cent.European carriers will see a significant fall in aggregate net profit from $US7.5 billion this year to $US5.6 billion next year, the equivalent of $US5.65 per passenger. Capacity growth of 4.3 per cent will outstrip demand growth of 4 per cent in a region IATA characterised as being  subject to intense competition “hampered by high costs, onerous regulation and high taxes’’.The association also noted that terrorist threats remained a real risk despite returning confidence after recent incidents.In the Asia- Pacific, carriers were expected generate a net profit of $US6.3 billion next year, down from $US7.3 billion, with per passenger profits at $US4.44. Capacity was expected to jump 7.6 per cent and outstrip a 7 per cent growth in demand.“Improved cargo performance is expected to offset rising fuel prices for many of the region’s airlines,’’ the analysis said. “The expansion of new model airlines and progressive liberalization in the region is intensifying already strong competition. In addition, profitability varies widely across the region.’’The forecast for the Middle East came with a warning that the region’s rapidly expanding carriers face threats in the new year that included rising airport charges and growing air traffic control delays.The  carriers were expected to make a net profit of $US300 million, down from $US900 million.“Average yields for the region’s carriers are low but unit costs are even lower, partly driven by the strong capacity expansion, forecast at 10.1 per cent …. ahead of expected demand growth of 9.0 per cent,’’ IATA said.Profit per passenger in Latin America is tipped to be less than $1 as the region’s carrier post a net profit $US200 million, down from $300 million this year. Capacity is expected to grow at 4.8 per cent ahead of demand growth of 4 per cent.“Despite some signs of improvement in the region’s currencies and economic prospects, operating conditions remain challenging, with infrastructure deficiencies, high taxes, and a growing regulatory burden across the continent,’’ IATA said.Regional conflict and low  commodity prices will again see African carriers make an overall loss of $9.97 per passenger or $US800 million. Capacity in 2017 is expected to grow by 4.7 per cent,  ahead of a 4.5 per cent growth in demand.last_img read more

How To Keep People From Waiting Out Your Transformation

first_imgYou are leading a transformation. What you are doing is critical to the future of your organization. It’s strategic. You can’t afford to fail.You built the burning platform and you made the case for change. You sold that change with a massive meeting, and you threw down the gauntlet.Week one: Everyone is on board, excited, and taking action. You are implementing, executing, and gathering feedback. You are sharing the results. Things are moving a long nicely.Week two: Mostly everyone is still on board and taking some action. Some of them are implementing, and some are struggling with the new actions. Those that are struggling are asking questions–and they’re questioning whether or not they can do what is being asked of them. Your leadership team keeps pushing forward.Week three: A lot of people are still on board, but they’ve gotten busy. They are too busy to focus on the new initiative, and they start slipping back into their old habits, the habits and activities that you are trying to kill. Your leadership team keeps pushing forward, but it’s hard to hold back the flood of problems, challenges, and backsliders.Week four: The leadership team starts to give up the ghost. They start backsliding. You’ve let up a bit, and you accept that they really are busy. You start to give them more room. You let them off the hook. The initiative teeters on the brink.Maybe I have the timeline wrong. Maybe it’s not 4 weeks. Let’s say it’s 12 weeks. Or 16 weeks if you like that better. It changes nothing; this is how initiatives die. Here’s what to do about it.Hold Them Accountable: If you are going to push your initiative over the line, you are going to have to hold everyone in the organization accountable for the changes. This includes the leadership team, as well as all of the individuals they lead.Put Change First on the Agenda: Begin every conversation and every meeting with an update on the status of the changes being made. By putting the change initiative first, you demonstrate its importance. And you prove that you are never going away or giving up.Appoint a Task Force: Find the true believers, the proselytizers, the fire-breathers and appoint them to a task force. Give them responsibilities for identifying those who are struggling to make change with the directive to help them–at any cost.Identify and Resell the Holdouts: There are many who will try to wait you out. They’re smart, too. They’ve seen enough initiatives die in the past, they’ve been trained to wait you out. Identify them. Single them out. Isolate them and sell them individually on the importance of your initiative. Ask them to personally support you and to act as leaders.If you give people space, they will wait you out. If you aren’t serious about your transformation, if you dabble around the edges, you will lose to the great pull and the irresistible allure of the status quo.last_img read more

Steve Jobs & Guy Kawasaki — Powerpoint Best Practices

first_img Originally published Jan 18, 2007 1:27:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Presentations I have recently come across some interesting Powerpoint best practices that I thought I would share with you. Steve JobsThe first best practice was from watching Steve Jobs’ presentation at MacWorld this year.  What was fascinating about his slides is that they were either just a picture or just a picture with a couple of words in extremely large font.  It turns out that Steve wants the audience to listen to him tell the story, rather than read the slides. Here’s a picture of one of Steve’s slides:In contrast to Steve’s slide show, here’s a picture of a slide from Michael Dell.  Michael’s would work well if it were designed to be sent to someone who would not have the benefit of hearing the story live, but next to Steve’s slides, they just seem cluttered.Guy KawasakiI recently read Guy Kawasaki’s “Art of The Start.”  In addition to being a good author/blogger, Guy was one of the very early Apple employees and more recently has been a venture/angel investor type where he has listened to countless Powerpoint presentations.  Presumably because he is tired of seeing poor Powerpoint presentations, he spends many pages in his book talking about Powerpoint best practices.  There were a few nuggets of Powerpoint wisdom among a lot of content about it that stuck with me a few days after finishing the book.His mantra is that Powerpoint should follow a 10/20/30 Rule.  There should be no more than 10 slides in the presentation — very few people take away much more than one concept from a presentation, so all that other stuff is extra.  The slide presentation should be designed to last 20 minutes, leaving room for ample questions/discussion between slides or after the presentation.  Guy points out that the point of the presentation is typically to initiate a discussion.  He says the font should be size should be no smaller than 30 (Arial font).  Guy says that audiences read faster than you can talk, so that while you are up there talking, they are trying to read your slides and not listening to what you are saying.He says that there are something like 60 animation features within Powerpoint and he recommends the less use of it the better.  His advice is to use your voice/body to emphasize when a point is important, not some fancy Powerpoint trick.  The only place he recommends using any of this is in going through bullet points on a slide, presumably to avoid having people read ahead.  Speaking of bullets, Guy suggests that bulleted slides should have one point with bullets and only one layer of bullets (lest you violate the 30 part of 10/20/30).If you have some great Powerpoint tips, please do share them with us…– Brian Halligan.last_img read more

Five Ways the YouTube Generation Is Replacing the MTV Generation

first_img When MTV went on air in 1981, .]  2. Stay Relevant Will It Blend Today there’s a new revolution happening: YouTube is killing the MTV star. MTV and cable television is steadily being replaced by online videos produced independently by high school kids in their bedrooms, software executives with senses of humor and millions of others. Youtube Marketing [This article was written by guest contributor Kate Morris of 5. Make it Known the first video it played PlumberSurplus Viral Campaign Making a wildly popular video that has nothing to do with your business or doesn’t talk to your customer will create traffic on your site, but no business. That is ultimately what you DON’T want (in most cases). (Example: As a consumer, you no longer need to wait on your couch to see what the vee-jay plays next. Videos like this one mocking the Backstreet Boys spread across the web like wildfire. All this creates a huge opportunity for you as an individual and as a marketer. With quality videos, you can reach a broad audience, and become part of the independent production movement replacing MTV. Just as if a tree falls in the forest and no one hears it, you can’t hide your video on your site and tell no one. Put it on YouTube, tell friends, send out an email, use other mediums to announce it. Buzz is king, and to get buzz about your video going, you have to start it yourself. Anybody with a video camera has a chance to get the world’s attention. The power is no longer in the hands of production companies and professional artists. People have a real say in what is shown, what is popular, and what’s just plain bad. So how do you produce quality videos that spread? Here are my top five tips:center_img 4. Don’t Be Pushy www.longhornkate.com ) — Video marketing is a powerful tool that can take your business to the next level, but also runs the risk of getting buried with everyone else’s videos. You need to make sure that you stand out in the crowd and reach who you need to talk to. (Example: Why make something if it’s not going to benefit your company in some way? Make sure people know that you are behind the awesome videos you create and give them a way to find you. ) 1. Be Memorable 3. Make Your Point was “Video Killed the Radio Star.” That marked the beginning of a revolution in television and music for an entire generation. If you have the right product or idea, the traffic and buzz will come to you. The key is to stay on top of trends and reach people where they are. Let them have the power and be rewarded in return. Originally published Sep 3, 2008 9:15:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Topics: While you need to make your point, you can’t “sell” people too hard. Make your video something fun, something people will want to see and share. Let it sell your services for you. Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Ten Tips for Marketing Job-Seekers in the Class of 2009

first_img Originally published Apr 28, 2009 8:30:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 Photo: Robert Crum on Flickr Inbound Marketing Kit So you’re graduating from college in a month, you’re interested in marketing, but the economy’s stuck in a ditch, you don’t have a marketing job, and you’re worried. What do you do to standout from the thousands of others in exactly the same situation? I interview a lot of people here at HubSpot, and I think there are a few things you can do. Here are my top 10: Start a blog. This is critical. At HubSpot resumes that list a blog immediately move to the front of the line. Here’s why: Online marketing is a complicated ecosystem in which blog posts are the cells — the most basic forms of life. If you’ve started and maintained a blog, you understand that ecosystem. You understand how search engines suck up content and spit back visitors. You understand how web applications work. You understand the concept of linking. You understand widgets and basic html. You understand how important pictures and video can be. You get the point. Start a blog. Take your job search seriously. Sounds basic, but it’s really, really important. Don’t start off your interview joking about drinking with your roommates, as one unsuccessful HubSpot applicant did this year. Show up on time, respond promptly and be prepared. It’s easy, and it makes a huge difference. Be confident. The job market is tough and looking for a job sucks, but don’t let it show. Walk into your interviews with your head high and everything under control. This is critical for marketing roles because it’s how marketers have to present their product. Start a Twitter account. Twitter will teach you a lot about new marketing techniques, but even more importantly, it will connect you with professionals and companies looking for talent. It’s also very useful from the employer’s standpoint. Right now I’m following several people who have applied for jobs at HubSpot. Twitter is a way for me to get to know them better. Think analytically. Inbound marketing is comprised of two main activities: Creating content and measuring its use. Candidates who can do both well get hired. Period. Know the company. If you’re interviewing at HubSpot, you better know what inbound marketing is, and you better know how our approach to marketing is different from that of traditional marketers. Every company has similar “must understand” tests. Figure out what they are before you apply. Demonstrate a content mindset . Go to meetups or events and post to flickr, YouTube or Facebook. Show that you’re not afraid to dive into these tools. Online marketing is about building an online presence through content. The more you can do that, the more valuable you’ll be to a company. Show that you get stuff done. There are people who get stuff done and there are people who talk about getting stuff done. Show that you’re the former. Blogging and creating content is a great way to do that. Get passionate about something. People need to know what makes you tick. You’re going to be a much more productive employee if you’re excited about what you’re doing, so employers want to understand what gets you fired up. Learn to write well. Much of the day-to-day inbound marketing grind is writing — case studies, blog posts, emails, video scripts and lots more. If you can write clearly, your employer will be able to keep you very busy. What tips would you add to this list? Please add them in the comments. I’ll update the post with some of my favorites later in the day. One more thing: If you’re a job seeker in the Boston area, definitely check out today’s MITX Digital Combine being held at the Back Bay Events Center all afternoon. I’ll be speaking on a panel at 3 p.m., “Positions in the Digital Industry: The Opportunities, Skills, and Experience Needed.”UPDATE: HubSpot friend and Boston videoblogger Steve Garfield has an awesome post today that’s right on the money: ” How to Get a Job at HubSpot .”A couple more great ideas from the comments:From Kevin Richard : “Interact with people in the industry/area you want to work in.” From David Spinks : “NEVER pass up an opportunity to reach new people.” Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Learn more about inbound marketing and how to combine blogging, SEO and social media for results. Download our inbound marketing kit .last_img read more

Free eBook: How to Use Online Video for Marketing

first_img Download the 18-page eBook. Here are a handful of tips that are included inside the eBook: that walks you through the entire video creation process: Marketers can use video to generate traffic to their websites, build brand buzz, collect inbound links (which can help SEO), and build social media presence and reach.  Filming Technique: To show the perspective of a person listening to another person, use an Over Shoulder shot. To get this shot, put the corner of the camera directly behind the shoulder of the person listening. Lighting Technique: Avoid recording a scene with a window in the background. This will cause your subjects to be dark and difficult to see. full of suggested beginner and intermediate cameras, audio equipment, editing programs and measurement tools. eMarketer predicts step-by-step eBook Originally published May 11, 2010 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016 that by the year 2013, 85% of Internet users (or 188 million people) will consume online video. The eBook also includes a Download the free eBook. Research company Promoting: Send traffic to your YouTube video immediately after publishing. YouTube rewards videos that receive a surge of traffic within the first 48-hours of being live by recommending the video to more viewers. To help you take advantage of video, we’ve created a Online Video Marketing Kit Video Equipment List . Topics: Want more? You can download additional resources on how to use video for business in our Video Editing: A video that begins suddenly (or loudly) can be jarring. Add video transitions like fade-ins and fade-outs between clips to add professional polish. This eBook is a great guide to learning how to create video from a business perspective. Use it to create great new video masterpieces that drive traffic, leads and business. How to Use Online Video for Marketing. Driving Business: Determine your video’s call-to-action when writing your video script. Video Marketing Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Set Expectations with Email Subject Lines [Data]

first_img There is nothing worse than getting an email from a company that clearly has no idea who you are. The obvious example is women getting emails clearly addressed to men and visa versa. 54 New Data Slides for Your Marketing Decks –  13.7% (OR) – 26.0% (CTR) Topics: Marketing Slide Show In-a-Box [Ready to use/share] 65 New Charts for Your Presentations – 14.3%(OR) – 22.8%(CTR) In our latest eBook, “ Get Key Marketing Trends from the Marketing Data Box and you quickly find out which ones get the best results. Recently we sent out five test subject lines for the same email and found out right away which one got the best results.  See if you can guess. Originally published May 13, 2011 3:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 A lot of energy is often put into a clever subject line that gets a good open rate. However, if it has little to do with the content in the email itself, you not only get horrendous click through rates, but you also damage your brand. Email marketing doesn’t lie.  It tells you right away what your open and click through rates were. The open rates were fairly close, the range going from 14.3% to 13.7%, but the click through rates were dramatically different with the high being 26% and the low being 10.4%. People get hundreds of emails a week and when they read them they do so with an expectation that was set up by the subject line. When writing your subject lines start by making sure it has a strong connection to the email itself. If after you’ve tested a number of variations and you still get low open and click through rates it’s not the fault of the subject line – it’s probably your offer. Writing bait and switch subject lines won’t change the eventual results either; they will just make people leery about reading your next email. Then in the body of the email, a slightly different greeting can make even more of an impact. The purpose is to let clients/customers know you are aware that they are clients/customers, while letting prospects know you understand their needs. 65 New Marketing Charts for Your Presentations – 13.7%(OR) – 24.3%(CTR) And the Winner Is! Marketing Slide Show In-a-Box [Ready to use/share] – 14.1%(OR) – 14.8%(CTR) Personalizing the Expectations 54 New Data Slides for Your Marketing Decks 7 Steps to Jump-Start Your Email Marketing Strategy So which of the five subject lines did you choose as the winner?  Here are the resultscenter_img ” we talk about segmenting your lists and changing the messaging to appeal to different groups. For example, say you want to promote the same offer to prospects and existing customers or clients. 65 New Marketing Charts for Your Presentations People Don’t Like the Bait and Switch : (OR is open rate and CTR is click through rate) 65 New Charts for Your Presentations Test a number of subject lines test similar subject lines A general rule of thumb is that the more thoroughly you can segment your lists and personalize your message, the better your response rates will be. And if you can personalize those expectations in your subject line and greeting, you’ll get even better results. Get Key Marketing Trends from the Marketing Data Box – 12.7%(OR) – 10.4%(CTR) Download the free ebook to energize your lead generation efforts and build more buzz around your business. This points to the importance of subject lines, not so much as the way to improve your open rate, but more as a way to set the expectation. All of these subject lines introduced the identical email, so it wasn’t the layout or wording within the email that had an impact. It was the subject line that set the tone. Free Ebook: 7 Steps to Jump-Start Your Email Marketing Strategy A step-by-step guide to email marketing for lead generation. Which one did you pick? Why do you think the winning one got the best results? First you would for both groups. You could further test tweaks to the winning subject line – one that acknowledges the customer or client. Email Subject Lines Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more