Magazine Web Site Traffic Up 11 Percent in Q4

first_imgThe MPA’s findings were based on analysis of Nielsen Online-supported data collected from 476 online consumer magazine brands. Consumer magazine Web sites saw traffic grow 11.1 percent in the fourth quarter of 2008 compared to the same period in 2007, the Magazine Publishers of America said during its annual Magazines 24/7 event today in New York. On average, 75 million monthly unique visitors logged onto consumer magazine sites during the fourth quarter, up from 67.5 million during the same period in 2007. Visitors also spent a third more time on magazine sites, the MPA said, averaging 2.4 billion minutes per month—a 34.4 percent increase from 1.78 billion minutes during the same period the prior year.While traffic numbers are growing for magazine Web sites, there have been indicators that there is still a major disconnect for print readers and the Web, according to the results of a consumer survey from PR shop The Rosen Group. While nearly 80 percent of respondents indicated that they subscribe to magazines, just 7 percent said they seek out the Web sites for the magazines they subscribe to.The Rosen Group polled 316 respondents, ages 12-75, online from February 18 to 23.last_img read more

Momo is dead says artist who created creepy bigeyed sculpture

first_imgThe supposed “Momo Challenge” made headlines recently, with representatives of YouTube saying the company has seen no recent evidence of videos promoting harmful and dangerous challenges on its site.But when stories about the alleged challenge made headlines, they were almost always accompanied by an unnerving image of a dark-haired creature with enormous eyes and a huge mouth. Now the artist who created that sculpture says he’s destroyed the creation. The Sun gives the artist’s name as Keisuke Aiso, but the original gallery link lists it as Keisuke Aisawa.The artist confirmed to The Sun that he was inspired by the Japanese legend of Ubume, a woman who dies in childbirth and returns in changed form to haunt the living.Only one eye remains of the rubber model, and he plans to recycle that eye in another work.”(The sculpture) doesn’t exist anymore, it was never meant to last,” he told The Sun. “It was rotten and I threw it away.”The supposed Momo Challenge reportedly originated on the WhatsApp messaging platform in 2018, and recently there were reports it had resurfaced on YouTube in the UK, allegedly hidden inside videos that appeal to kids. Aiso’s creature is supposedly shown as the face of a character named Momo who issues a series of challenges, including harming themselves and others. Although UK police and schools issued warnings about the challenge, YouTube said it has no evidence the challenge has been hidden in videos.Aiso said he intended the character to be scary but never intended it should be used to hurt anyone.”It is a ghoul, about the death of a woman in childbirth, in a way its reason for being is to scare children, but it wasn’t supposed to be used in the way it has,” he said. “It was never meant to be used to make children harm themselves or cause any physical harm.”He also said the creation was rotting and “looked even more terrifying” when he threw it out, and that he’s received threatening messages from those who think he was somehow involved in the challenge.”I have no regrets that it is gone,” he said. Japanese sculptor Keisuke Aiso didn’t respond to CNET’s request for comment, but the artist told British tabloid newspaper The Sun he’s thrown out the artwork.”The children can be reassured Momo is dead,” he told The Sun. “She doesn’t exist and the curse is gone.”The original sculpture, called Mother Bird, shows a human-style head with long dark hair spread sparsely over the creature’s forehead, enormous round eyes, an oversized mouth and a flattened nose. The naked creature has the feet of a bird and not much of a torso. It was built in 2016 and displayed at Vanilla Gallery in Tokyo. Comments 4 Tagscenter_img ‘Shark stepping on a Lego’ photo goes viral; here’s the real story National Weather Service issues ‘small dog warning’ due to wind Bruno Ganz, whose Hitler scene from Downfall took over YouTube, dies at 77 More viral news Share your voice Online Digital Medialast_img read more