Silly Evolution Speculations Would Cease If Media Allowed Fair Debate

first_imgEvolutionists get away with ridiculous stories because Big Science and Big Media are intolerant of opposing views. Healthy science requires open debate.Darwinians have their own blasphemy laws. Try criticizing Darwin, natural selection, universal common ancestry or any of his core precepts and you will feel the heat of wrath and mockery, if not expulsion. Darwin skeptics have been relegated to their own institutions outside of Big Science and Big Media, where many in the public never hear that answers to Darwinian claims even exist. In the vacuum of debate about the origin of life’s amazing diversity and complexity, charlatans have rushed in with no shame or conscience, presenting themselves as reliable spokespersons for ‘science.’ Take a look at these recent examples out of hundreds we have reported over the years.Evolution might favor ‘survival of the laziest’ (Science Daily). So malleable is Darwin’s Stuff Happens Law (i.e., “whatever happens, it evolved”), anything can count as ‘fitness,’ even laziness. Look how this article begins: “If you’ve got an unemployed, 30-year-old adult child still living in the basement, fear not.” Whoever wrote this has just given slackers a new excuse for irresponsibility: ‘Darwin made me this way.’ According to champion Darwin storytellers at the University of Kansas, lazy slackers are just as fit as cheetahs, peregrine falcons and pronghorns— maybe more so!“Maybe in the long term the best evolutionary strategy for animals is to be lassitudinous and sluggish — the lower the metabolic rate, the more likely the species you belong to will survive,” Lieberman said. “Instead of ‘survival of the fittest,’ maybe a better metaphor for the history of life is ‘survival of the laziest’ or at least ‘survival of the sluggish.’”Laziness May Have Driven Homo Erectus to Extinction (Live Science). This article illustrates how Darwinians can use their vacuous theory to ‘explain’ opposite things. We just heard one argue for survival of the laziest, and now another argues for extinction of the laziest. Stuff happens! What kind of ‘law of nature’ is this? A house divided against itself cannot stand. Can we laugh out loud at this writer’s folly, or will that risk arrest by the Darwin enforcers?It turns out laziness existed long before couches and takeout. The “why bother?” attitude not only existed hundreds of thousands of years ago, but may also have led to the decline of an ancient human ancestor.The illogic of this explanation presents itself if you ask the question, “Did natural selection make Homo erectus lazy, or did they choose laziness by intelligent design and free will?” If the former, then natural selection not only evolved extinction (the opposite of survival); it also evolved the lazy reporter who believes it. If the latter, then how could natural selection come up with its opposite, intelligent design? That’s not the only illogical aspect of the story. Are we to accept the either-or fallacy that every individual in the H. erectus population was lazy, and every individual in the modern human population was not? That is clearly not the case by observation of modern humans today. The story also commits the fallacies of glittering generalities, post hoc, non-sequitur, and other blunders (see Baloney Detector). Where are the peer reviewers who should have tossed this idea into the circular file, or submitted it to the IgNobel Prize contest?Why war evolved to be a man’s game – and why that’s only now changing (The Conversation). This politically-correct argument by Alberto Micheletti (PhD Candidate in Evolutionary Biology, University of St Andrews) may please liberals who decry ‘toxic masculinity’ but deserves laughter, not serious consideration. Why? Because if “the evolution of war” is a result of evolutionary biology instead of mental activity, free will or intelligent design, so is “the evolution of evolutionary just-so storytelling.” Short circuit!Evolution and the concrete jungle (Phys.org). Evolutionists from the University of Toronto are finding that birds or plants that inhabit cities show variations from those in the wild. That much is not controversial; even the most ardent young-earth creationists accept variation within kinds. But these evolutionary biologists bring in Darwin:“These papers greatly advance our knowledge of urban evolutionary biology,” says Marc Johnson, an associate professor of biology at UTM and director of the Centre for Urban Environments. “These are the same evolutionary mechanisms first identified by Charles Darwin more than 150 years ago and the findings from these studies will be increasingly important as more and more of the world’s population flocks to urban environments.“It’s pretty remarkable. For years, biologists ignored cities, seeing them as ‘anti-life’, and only recently biologists began to realize that cities are agents of change, driving evolution of organisms living around us and even some living on us.”Clarity about terms is essential for seeing through this equivocation fallacy, which confuses microevolution with macroevolution. Darwin argued that the entirety of life, from bacteria to humans, arose by natural selection. Creationists back to Adam have known about small-scale changes, such as in flower color or plant height. There is no Darwinian evolution or ‘origin of species’ then or now. Notice:The clovers are still clovers.The Daphnia are still Daphnia.The burrowing owls are still burrowing owls.The Brachypodium sylvaticum grass is still the same species.Nothing has ‘evolved’ in a Darwinian sense. The evolutionists only observed very small-scale changes within species. Ken Ham would yawn at this. He believes even greater changes have occurred in just the last few thousand years since the Flood, so much so that we might not recognize the animals that came off Noah’s Ark. If these evolutionists cannot distinguish between Darwin’s theory and creationist baraminology (variation within created kinds), the actual data could be adduced by creationists in support of their view. Unfairly, Big Science and Big Media forbid them to make their case. Readers get the impression that Darwin’s macroevolutionary theory has been vindicated by the observations.What is nothing? Q&A with Martin Rees (The Conversation). If you don’t believe that highly-educated people can say stupid things, watch the Astronomer Royal of Great Britain flub up the definition of ‘nothing’ by making it something. This ardent materialist and evolutionist says, “empty space isn’t really empty – there’s a mysterious energy latent in it which can tell us something about the fate of the universe.” Dr Rees, please: if the vacuum of space has energy and properties, then it is not nothing. He admits, “everyone who ponders these mysteries should realise that the physicist’s empty space – vacuum – is not the same as the philosopher’s “nothing”.” OK, then answer the question: What is nothing? He commits a major sidestepping blunder by talking about something instead of nothing. A child could have noticed this.Evolutionists would be ashamed to make such arguments if creationists had a chance at the podium. Whenever an ID advocate or creationist has a fair opportunity to debate an evolutionist (something Darwin himself stated was essential to get a fair result), the evolutionist usually gets voted down by the audience. Silliness thrives in the absence of debate. Darwinist totalitarianism, enforced by Big Science and Big Media, must be overthrown!C.S. Lewis pulled the rug out from everything evolutionary materialists say by pointing out how it is self-refuting. The moment an evolutionist speaks or writes to ‘explain’ nature in material terms, he shoots himself in the foot. Here are Lewis’s inimitable words. Learn these ideas well.Unless you start by believing that reality in the remotest space and the remotest time rigidly obeys the laws of logic, you have no ground for believing in any astronomy, any biology, any paleontology, any archaeology. If my own mind is the product of the irrational— if what seem my clearest reasonings are only the way in which a creature conditioned as I am is bound to feel – how shall I trust my mind when it tells me about Evolution? They say in effect ‘I will prove that what you call a proof is only the result of mental habits which result from heredity which results from bio-chemistry which results from physics.’ But this is the same as saying: ‘I will prove that proofs are irrational’: more succinctly, ‘I will prove that there are no proofs’.”  …A theory which explained everything else in the whole universe but which made it impossible to believe that our thinking was valid would be utterly out of court. For that theory would itself have been reached by thinking, and if thinking is not valid that theory would, of course, be demolished. It would have destroyed its own credentials. It would be an argument which proved that no argument was sound—a proof that there are no such things as proofs.  (Visited 516 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Brand South Africa to connect with expats Down Under

first_imgBrand South Africa is returning to Australia for the third time to meet with expatriates. This time, it will try to get those South Africans to get involved with initiatives back home.Globals South Africans (GSAs) living in Australia will have a chance to voice their concerns about their home nation when Brand South Africa hosts the GSA event Down Under. (Image: Nicki Mannix, via Flickr)Brand South Africa ReporterBrand South Africa are returning to Australia this month to meet and network with South Africans currently living Down Under.Two dinner gatherings, the first taking place tonight, 7 March, in Sydney and the second in Melbourne on 9 March, will look to incite pride and patriotism in the expatriates.The events are part of the Brand South Africa’s Global South Africans (GSA) initiative, which reaches out to expatriates living and working abroad. Through GSA, the organisation keeps South Africans updated on developments in the country and involve them directly in efforts to promote and market the nation brand.According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australia is home to an estimated 150 000 South African immigrants. Many families have been living there since the 1970’s. However, they still maintain active contact through investments, family and friends.They are also unquestionably proud of their roots, as a delegation led by the late Minister Collins Chabane, discovered in the first GSA visit to Australia in November 2014. They found that the South Africans still felt strongly about the country and were still willing to give back.In the last visit to Australia in March 2015, Brand South Africa tried to understand the expats’ needs and perceptions, and identify ways the organisation can work directly with them.For this year’s visit, Brand South Africa will be responding to some of the issues raised in 2015. The organisation will also:Provide updated information and feedback on the performance of the nation brand domestically and internationally.Share information on the GSA programme in other countries such as the US, UK, Africa and the Middle East.Make GSAs aware of Brand South Africa’s long-term partners – such as Gift of the Givers, Partners for Possibility and the Nelson Mandela Foundation – and try to get them involved. This will also involve starting student exchange programmes between learning institutions in both countries.For more information, follow #SADownUnder on Twitter.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

16 Days of Activism against abuse

first_imgImagine if, for 16 days, there was no rape, no child abuse. The 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children campaign challenges South Africans to declare a truce on violence against women and children – and, ultimately, to make it a permanent one.South Africa joins the global 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children campaign in 1998. (Image: South African Government, Flickr, CC BY-ND 2.0)Brand South Africa reporterImagine if, for 16 days, there was no rape, no child abuse. The 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children campaign challenges South Africans to declare a truce on violence against women and children – and, ultimately, to make it a permanent one.For the 16th year, South Africa is taking part in the global 16 Days of Activism for No Violence Against Women and Children campaign, which runs from 25 November (International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women) through to International Human Rights Day on 10 December.With the theme “Count me in: Together moving a non-violent South Africa forward”, the campaign will be officially launched by President Jacob Zuma in Reiger Park, Ekurhuleni, on 25 November.While the campaign runs only for 16 days each year, its objectives are reinforced by a year-long programme and a national plan to combat abuse.South Africa is still home to high levels of violence against its women and children, despite a world-renowned Constitution and a legislative overhaul that safeguards women’s and children’s rights.The government, business, civil society organisations, faith-based organisations and the media are all participating in the drive to increase awareness of the negative impact of violence and abuse on women and children.The campaign also aims to:Challenge the perpetrators of violence to change their behaviour.Involve men in helping to eradicate violence.Provide survivors with information on services and organisations that can help lessen the impact of violence on their lives.While the campaign runs only for 16 days each year, its objectives are reinforced by a year-long programme and a national plan to combat abuse.What you can doSouth Africans are urged to support the campaign by wearing a white ribbon – a symbol of peace – during the 16-day period to symbolise their commitment to never commit or condone violence against women or children.Other ways of supporting the campaign:Speak out against woman and child abuse. Encourage silent female victims to challenge abuse, and ensure that they get help. Report child abuse to the police immediately. Encourage children to report bullying behaviour to school authorities.Men are critical partners in the fight against the abuse of women and children. Men and boys are encouraged to talk about abuse and actively discourage abusive behaviour.Families must stick together to create a safe environment for women and children.Parents and adults can make sure that children are not exposed to inappropriate sexual and violent material.Volunteer some of your time and energy in support of a non- governmental organisation or community group working in your area to help abused women and children. Use your life skills and knowledge to help support victims of abuse.Donate some money to organisations working to end violence against women and children by making a contribution to the Foundation for Human Rights. Tel: 011 339 5560/1/2/3/4/5.Engage in online dialogues such as the Cyber Dialogues organised by Gender Links which provides a platform to share issues and experiences and offer solutions, with experts participating in the online chats. Gender Links also offers way for you to support recent survivors or gender-based violence. See the online pledge form.Get connected with important contacts and information published on www.womensnet.org.za.Seek help if you are emotionally, physically or sexually abusive to your partner and/or children. Call the Stop Gender Based Violence helpline on 0800 150 150.Report illegal guns to the police – according to the International Action Network on Small Arms Women’s Network, women are three times more likely to die violently if there is a gun in the home.Join a community policing forum (CPF) or community safety forum (CSF) to help fight crime in your area. For information on how to join, contact your local police station.Rhetoric and realitySouth Africa, according to non-governmental organisation Gender Links, needs to close the gap between the “rhetoric of gender equality” and the “reality on the ground”.Gender Links says the country has made impressive strides in recognising the roles and rights of women and children.The Constitution recognises gender equality as the cornerstone of South Africa’s democracy, and new legislation – such as the Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act and the Domestic Violence Act – have been lauded for enforcing the rights of women.But more needs to be done. “Changing laws can be swift,” says Gender Links. “Giving them effect, and changing the mindsets that often render them ineffective, is a much more demanding task.” Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.,Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.,Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

RW10: The 10 Most Important Stories In ReadWrite’s History

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting ReadWrite celebrates its 10th anniversary on Saturday, April 20, 2013. For the occasion, we’re running a series of articles  looking back—and looking forward.As ReadWrite founder Richard MacManus noted in observing the site’s 10th anniversary, our original goal was “to convert the Web into a two-way system.”Back in 2003, only those with the technical skills to build websites could publish their thoughts. Those walls have broken down. For good or ill, the Web is now clearly a two-way system, and ReadWrite continues to explore what it means to live in a world where every object is something we can all read and write.But it’s been a long journey to get there. For our 10th anniversary, we’ve highlighted the 10 most important stories in the publication’s history. Not just posts that generated lots of traffic or whipped up controversy, but the stories that set an agenda and mapped out what was coming next.These were the stories that helped readers understand the monumental shifts in how we work, how we play, and how we communicate. From the evolution of Twitter as a platform for serious discourse to the steady rise of the Android operating system to rival Apple’s iPhone and iPad, these stories highlight ReadWrite’s history of invaluable analysis amid uncertain time.  1. 10 Future Web TrendsBy Richard MacManus / September 2007From Web services to personalization to the rise of Internet TV, our founder called some big shifts early on.2. The Rise of Twitter as a Platform for Serious DiscourseBy Josh Catone / January 2008Twitter was not barely a year and a half old when writer Josh Catone commented on its potential to go beyond 140 characters. 3. ReadWriteWeb Interview With Tim Berners-Lee, Part 1: Linked DataBy Richard MacManus / July 2009Called a “career highlight” by the man who started ReadWrite 10 years ago, Richard MacManus’s interview with Internet pioneer Sir Tim Berners-Lee explored the deeper meaning of the Web.4. 13 Tools For Building Your Own iPhone AppBy Sarah Perez / November 2009Just as we covered the democratization of Web publishing, we were early in showing how the app economy was an opportunity for anyone.5. Facebook Wants To Be Your One True LoginBy Mike Melanson / February 2010This story drew a lot of attention because confused search visitors thought this page would help them log in to the social network. What they found instead was a smart and prophetic take on how Facebook would become a universal login service for all kinds of websites and apps.6. How Old Spice Won The InternetBy Marshall Kirkpatrick / July 2010Marketing, too, became two-way, as a major consumer product adopted the Internet’s real-time ethic. 7. iPhone to Android: One Month with the Nexus SBy Sarah Perez / January 2011For ReadWrite, testing gadgets isn’t about checking speeds and feeds. It’s about living with them.8. Google to Launch Major New Social Network Called Circles, Possibly TodayBy Marshall Kirkpatrick / March 2011In a major scoop, ReadWrite learned about a key feature of Google’s Facebook killer months before its launch.9. Top 10 YouTube Videos Of All TimeBy Richard MacManus / September 2012To write about a user-generated site, you have to understand the content its community embraces. 10. Why Are Dead People Liking Stuff On Facebook?By Bernard Meisler / December 2012This investigation into possibly bogus “likes” on Facebook raised big questions about the social network’s value to marketers.Image courtesy of Richard MacManus. From the ReadWrite Summit in May of 2010 (from left to right), Frederic Lardinois, Chris Cameron, Richard ManManus, Marshall Kirkpatrick, Sean Ammirati.  Tags:#ReadWrite#RW10#ten Related Posts Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic…center_img nick statt A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more