Syracuse announces 4 captains for 2015 season

first_img Published on August 29, 2015 at 8:43 pm Contact Connor: cgrossma@syr.edu | @connorgrossman Facebook Twitter Google+ Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer announced on Twitter that senior offensive lineman Rob Trudo, sophomore linebacker Zaire Franklin, junior defensive end Luke Arciniega and senior quarterback Terrel Hunt are SU’s captains this season. Trudo is slated to play center this season after starting nine games at left guard and two at right guard last season. The 6-foot-4, 301-pound center played in all 12 games last season.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThe sophomore Franklin is the youngest of the four captains, and last season he led all of SU’s freshmen with 44 tackles. He appeared in all 12 of the Orange’s games last season and started the final three.Arciniega originally transferred from Sierra College after the 2012 season, and appeared in only four games last season due to a lower-body injury. The NCAA recently granted him two extra years of eligibility ahead of his third season with SU.Despite an on-field incident last year when Hunt when was ejected for punching a Villanova defender, he was selected as a captain in his final season with SU. He started only five games last season before suffering a season-ending injury against Louisville on October 3.Syracuse begins its season Friday at home against Rhode Island. Commentslast_img read more

Srinagar church bell rings again after 50 years

first_imgA new bell in Srinagar’s Holy Family Catholic Church is ringing in the spirit of harmony after the previous one went silent half a century ago.The 105 kilogram bell was inaugurated on Sunday at a short ceremony at 11.30 a.m. in the church located on Srinagar’s M.A. Road by representatives of Muslims, Hindus, Christians and Sikhs. The Parish priest Father Roy Matthews officiated. “It is a joyous moment for all of us. Kashmir has a rich composite culture and harmonious coexistence is the very essence of Kashmiriyat. So I see this against that background, with representatives of various religions joining us in our happiness. At the same time, we want to send out a message at the national, international and local levels that we are one here and we love and accept each other as we are,” said Father Matthews. Representatives of several religions were present, “to jointly ring the new bell for the first time in the past 50 years,” said church committee spokesman S.M. Rath. The British-era church, built in 1896, had lost its original bell in a fire sparked by “an arson incident” on June 7, 1967. The bell, the largest of its kind in the State, was a gift from a Kashmiri Christian family. Kashmir hosts a small Christian population, and has three main churches in Srinagar and Baramulla. The Christian population, as per the 2011 census, is 0.28% in the State. Around 30 Catholic families live in the Valley. “This ceremony is a historic occasion for the microscopic Christian community in Kashmir,” said the spokesman.Arab-Israeli warThe arson of 1967 was triggered by the Arab-Israeli war, and the church was rebuilt a few years later. The new bell is made of cast iron and was installed by local carpenters and labourers, aided by those from outside. On Sunday, as the bell rope was pulled by the representatives jointly, a group of children from different religious backgrounds sang in chorus.Pandits should return Gyani Jaipal Singh, a Sikh representative, said he joined in “to keep peace and harmony alive in Kashmir.” Haji Manzoor, another representative, said, “This act sends a message to those [Kashmiri Pandits] who migrated from the valley [in the early 1990s] to return.”Last year, the church members had a muted Christmas celebration in the wake of more than 90 civilian deaths in protests across the Valley.last_img read more

Five Legitimate Reasons Your Business Doesn’t Need A WebSite

first_img think arelegitimate that didn’t make the list above, please share them in thecomments.  I’ll do a follow-up article and capture the ones Imissed. Legitimate Reasons Your Business Doesn’tNeed An Effective Website One of the primary reasons for having a working, effective website is to increase the number of clients you have and grow your revenues.  If you’re not looking to grow your business significantly, there’s probably little reason to try and find more clients or grow your revenues.   You’re not looking to grow:  .  Most of these reasons are little more than rationalizationsfor existing behavior.  But, there are some reasons that are actually very good Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack As you read through the above, notice some of the reasonsthat did If you have the luxury of running a business for which there is very little (if any) competition and you’ve got an offering that people must have, a website is probably not crucial.  Your clients need what you have and there’s nowhere else to go.  Congratulations!  Though a shiny new website might impress your spouse and colleagues, you probably don’t need one to improve your business.   If you are looking to increase staff, chances are that your prospective recruits (particularly the kinds of people you want to hire) will likely want to learn more about you.  The web is a great place to do that.  This is particularly true for new entrants into the workforce that have grown up with the Internet.  When faced with the decision of joining an organization that has a vibrant and interactive website where they can learn about what the company does and what makes them “tick” vs. an organization that simply has a brochure on the web – most recruits will pick the one with the more expressive website, all other things being equal.  Small businesses are particularly well served as they don’t have the brand and resources that can help attract exceptional people outside of their immediate network.  A website can help with that. I’ll admit that there are many businesses that do a great job of getting referral customers and tapping their existing network for new business.  If this is you, then perhaps a website is not that important.  This assumes of course that your rolodex will Note:  Just because you qualify for one of thesereasons doesn’t necessarily let you off the hook.  But if a few ofthem are true (or one of the big ones like #1 or #2 apply), then you probablycan get away with a flat website that doesn’t do very much. you You don’t expect to sell the company any time soon:  You’re operating in a virtual monopoly: center_img some You’re Not Hiring Any Time Soon: I’d like to share the really good reasons why aworking website may not be relevant for your business.  asset I have conversations with business owners every weekregarding Internet strategy (and why they need one).  Most of these conversationsare with smart people with reasonably successful businesses.  When facedwith the discussion of their website, they often come up with lots of reasonswhy an effective website isn’t all that relevant for them.  Sure,they understand the need to have For more and more types of businesses, the website is an important that factors into valuation discussions.  This is particularly true if you have a startup business, a hi-tech business or one that “scales” well (i.e. adding new customers does not increase costs proportionately).  The reason is quite simple.  If you have an effective website and can demonstrate that it is successful at helping you get new clients, you have a better business than someone who doesn’t.  The Internet is a great way for many businesses to have a low customer acquisition cost.  The other nice thing about the Internet as a vehicle for marketing and sales is that it can be more easily measured.  Imagine if you are selling your business and are able to show the acquirer a chart of your web traffic (and how it’s grown over time) and clear data on how that web traffic translates into revenues.  (You will likely find that the two are highly correlated).  If I were on the buying said, I’d sit up and take notice. make this list.  Exampleswould include “I don’t sell an online product, so I really don’tneed a website.”  Or, “My clients don’t really use theweb, so there’s really no reason for me to invest there.”  If youhave reasons that not to be an effective mechanism for you to get all the new business you need. continue web presence, but they really don’t believe that for their particularbusiness an effective website is going to make that big of a difference.  Theyhave lots of reasons why this is so. Originally published Nov 7, 2006 12:00:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 Your rolodex is sufficient for lead generation: last_img read more

Top 10 Ways NOT to Spend $12 Million on Marketing

first_img Advertising Back in 1999 a lot of startups burned through all of their cash on crazy advertising programs and marketing stunts.  Even though HubSpot recently raised $12 million in venture capital financing, that’s not us.  In fact, because we use mostly inbound marketing, we spend relatively little on marketing.  So, I thought it might be fun to think about the ways we could (but won’t) spend the money.Send 17 Million Pieces of Direct Mail.  There are a bunch of services where you can rent a list, they will print, address and mail a postcard for you for about $0.70 including postage.  There are 25 million businesses in the US, we could get rid of the 8 million that are not a good fit for HubSpot, and send the rest of them a postcard.Place 50 Million Cold Calls.  I found this service online that will make 1,000 cold calls for $250.  Well, I’ve got $12 million dollars, and I figure I should get a little discount for buying in bulk.  With 50 million cold calls, we could call every single business in the US…. twice.  How awesome would that be!  Talk about a great way to get the word out.  After just a couple weeks every single business owner in the US would know HubSpot.  Talk about buzz!!!Create a mascot and make it world famous.  I am thinking that we need to do something with the orange widget in our logo.  Give it a face and a name, and have it walk around and talk to people about marketing.  Maybe it could also be really snarky and sarcastic and make funny jokes about how lame most advertising is.  We’ll schedule some time with the creatives at our NYC advertising agency and then hire a director to film some short movies with our new mascot.  (Inspiration: Do you remember the Pets.com sock puppet?  It was a character that the startup created to market itself.  When the company finally went bankrupt, many people speculated that the sock puppet character was worth more than the company.)  Buy 1 Billion Pop-up Ads.  If you assume a $12 CPM for pop-up ads we could get a billion of them.  Imagine a billion pop-ups invading every computer online.  We could do all of the “best practices” for pop-up ads.  “Squash the monkey and win a prize.”  “Pick who will win, Obama or Hillary.”  “System message: Your computer is about to electrocute your mother unless you click this box and pay $9.95 to have the virus removed.”  I think the response to this would be huge!Start a Fleet of 5 HubSpot Blimps.  This would be cool.  We just pick the 5 best markets in the US for HubSpot and park a blimp overhead 24×7.  A blimp is about $2 million, so this plan still gives us $400K to pay for gas and pilots for each blimp (and you thought I wasn’t thinking ahead).  Everyone in New York, Chicago, Los Angeles, Boston and San Francisco would be wondering “What the heck does HubSpot have to do with a blimp?”  We’d be wondering the same thing.  But it would still be cool.   Put Marketing Devices Similar to Bombs in a City.  You all heard about the backfired marketing stunt in Boston from Turner Broadcasting?  Where they put electronic signs that got mistaken for bombs around the city?  Sure, it shut down a lot of the major roads and got them sued and they had to pay a ton of fees in damages to the city.  But talk about BUZZ, baby!  The stunt got them coverage in the New York Times!  All PR is good PR as they say.  And with $12 million we can place a lot of devices and still pay off a bunch of lawsuits.  Bring it on!The HubSpot NASCAR team.  Sure, there is not a strong connection between NASCAR fans and HubSpot’s target market.  But who can resist the lure of getting involved in one of the fastest growing sports in the US, especially when it is much more open to commercial involvement that other sports.  A cool $12 million will net us a lead sponsorship of a lower level NASCAR team, including our logo on the car, uniforms, using the crew in marketing events, and more.      Hire a Celebrity Spokesperson.  Want a great way to get people to pay more attention to your company?  Hire a celebrity as your spokesperson.  GoDaddy has Danica Patrick.  Accenture uses Tiger Woods.  I had a hard time thinking about who would be best for HubSpot.   But I think Oprah might be a good choice – she has proven she has staying power, and she is basically a self made marketing success having promoted herself for years.  Another choice might be Martha Stewart.  I’d just want to hear her say “HubSpot, its a good thing.”  But I guess the whole insider trading and prision thing might not be a positive for our brand.  If you have ideas about this, leave a comment.  I’m all ears.       10,000 Hours of Infomercials.  Have you ever bought a set of steak knives from a late-night TV ad?  What about a juicer or car wax?  And don’t forget any number of cleaning products from electric sweepers to miracle stain removers.  Do you dread your nights of insomnia because you fear it will cost you more than just lost sleep because the infomercials are too convincing?  Clearly we’re missing a big opportunity here.  I mean at 2am when you can’t sleep, you are certainly looking for some inbound marketing software.  HubSpot Infomercials, here we come!  “Get started fast with just 12 monthly payments of $250!  Buy today and get a Free Website Grader Report!”  Send 250 Billion Spam Emails.  Yes, 250 BILLION with a B, baby!!!  This is an even better deal than those cold calls.  I found this service online that will send 4,000,000 “opt-in emails” for just $200, and again, they discount at higher volumes so I should be able to get an even better rate.  Think about the effect this would have.  If we sent them all at once we could probably crash the entire Internet.  Sure, probably a lot of them would be blocked by Spam filters.  But some of them would have to get through.  Plus the buzz factor would be tremendous!!!  Pretty much everyone on the planet could get an email from HubSpot. Or every person in the US old enough to use email could get 1,000 HubSpot advertisement emails.  That’s one a day for three years.  Huge!  The best part about this program… they take credit cards online so I get 12 million AMEX points once I fill out my expense report.  Can you say 4 weeks all expenses paid in Tahiti?  I can!What would you do if you wanted to waste $12 million on marketing?   Leave a comment with your own funny idea.The Funniest Idea of How to Spend $12 Million to Market HubSpot will Win a $100 Amazon Gift CardPost your idea as a comment on this article.  The comment must be made by 12 midnight on Tuesday, May 20, and I alone will be responsible for determining what the funniest idea is.Update: Contest is Now ClosedThe winner is Pete from www.elrhino.com.  His reponse, and the accompanying Boston Globe article was the one that caused the most out loud laughter around the office.  Click here to open the full size version in a new window.  Pete should email me at mvolpe [at] hubspot [dot] com to claim your prize.There were lots of good ideas!  All the other tattoo ideas were good, the in person pop-ups suggested by Lisa Warnock were cool (and actually could be do-able on a small scale), and the awesome idea of HubSpot toilet paper by Darren Angus with the slogan “When you least want to be interrupted, you’ll be happy we are there.”  I wonder what Charmin would charge for that? Originally published May 19, 2008 10:36:00 AM, updated October 29 2019 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Invitation to Beta Test New PR Tool – Press Release Grader

first_img Public Relations At HubSpot, we love to provide free tools to the marketing community.  This Internet Marketing Blog is free, and read by thousands of marketers like you (thanks!).  We also built Website Grader, a free SEO tool, and that has been used to evaluate well over 300,000 different websites.Now it’s time to try something else new, and we want your help.  We’re launching a new tool called Press Release Grader, which analyzes your press release and provides some ideas on how to improve it.We’d appreciate it if you went to www.PressReleaseGrader.com and evaluated a couple press releases.  We appreciate all feedback and look forward to improving the tool based on your input – so let us know what you love about it and also what you hate about it!  You can either use the feedback link on the report, or just leave a comment on this blog article.Here is a video overview of Press Release Grader: Topics: Originally published May 30, 2008 10:56:00 AM, updated July 03 2013 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Marketing Headlines of the Week: Know Yourself, Know Your Customer

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Jul 3, 2009 11:30:00 AM, updated October 01 2019 My mom used to leave me notes and lists of chores right in my spot at the kitchen table, an easy drop for her on her way out in the morning. I couldn’t eat breakfast without moving it out of the way, making the lists hard to ignore.This should be the case with your company’s online presence — you need to be found in places where your target audience will naturally look for information. One of the keys to getting found online is to have a broad online presence, but targeted in the places that make sense for you and for your potential clients, which is a recurring lesson among this week’s top five news stories from InboundMarketing.com:1. How Broad is Your Footprint on the Web?Author: Bernie BorgesLesson: Spread and Diversify Your ContentWith millions of pages and more being created every day, it may seem impossible for your company to get found online. But according to Borges, broadening your online footprint is best accomplished by spreading and diversifying fresh content. As he says, “most marketers still think being found on the web means being found in a search engine either in an organic listing, or in a paid listing (PPC). This is a limited view of effective inbound marketing on the web.”Borges recently spoke to a prospective buyer who could not pinpoint where he had come across Borges, yet in the past week he had found his company’s website, blog and a podcast. Borges emphasizes that sellers who want to succeed in the coming decades need to have strong content across a variety of web platforms and engage with relevant communities.2. YouTube CTA Overlay Lets You Drive Users ElsewhereAuthor: Marketing VoxLesson: Use Multimedia Channels to Drive TrafficThis new feature on YouTube adds a call-to-action overlay to videos; advertisers can now redirect viewers to their site or product through links in this overlay. (Here’s an article that explains how to add the overlays.) Before, a viewer might have watched a video or commercial and then moved on to another clip, promptly forgetting any marketing messages. Now, an organization can bring the viewer to their site instantly.Non-profits such as charity:water have already benefited from this new feature. YouTube recently put a video supporting charity:water on its homepage, which resulted in $10,000 in donations for the organization in a single day.3. A Checklist to Choose Which Internet Marketing Channel is Right for Your BusinessAuthor: Rand FishkinLesson: Know Your Company & Your ResourcesIn his post, Fishkin addresses the following question: “If a client came to you with $1 million to invest in a single Internet marketing channel, which one would you choose?” Fishkin has put together a series of graphs and charts that show how a company could measure its budget, goals and available talent to determine which channel would have the highest ROI.So, before you can attempt to bring in more visitors to your site and convert more of these visitors to leads, it’s important to know your own capabilities, strengths and weaknesses. After taking these into account, you will have more insight to choose the internet marketing channel that will be the most effective for you.4. Strategic Blogging and Some Tactics to Nail ItAuthor: Chris BroganLesson: Go With What Works for YouThis post by Brogan discusses various strategies to take with blogging for business to get back that ROI. Brogan emphasizes that a strategy does not have to be set in stone, it should be malleable, aligning with your company’s current needs and goals. There are many different ways to use a blog to accomplish a goal — from how-to posts to posts that spotlight a customer or a case study. Figure out your goals first, and then choose the best strategy for you.5. 7 Tips on how B2B marketers can leverage social mediaAuthor: Brian CarrollLesson: You Have to Give to GetThe lesson here reflects a basic principle of good inbound marketing. Carroll’s tips reiterate the teaching that you cannot expect to get visitors, leads, comments, customers, retweets, or whatever it may be, unless you give valuable content by sharing blog posts, e-books, whitepapers, presentations, webinars with people who are interested in that information.Using social media is an easy way to share content, absorb others’ content, to be helpful and to receive help from others. Establishing yourself as a trusted source in your industry can be accomplished through the continued use of social networks, but only if you are willing to listen and share.Photo: SewPixie .: actually sewing :. Webinar: How to Sell Social Media to Your Boss Social media guru Chris Brogan explains how to demonstrate the value of social media marketing. Download the free webinar to learn how to get your company started with social media.last_img read more

How Context Strengthens Your Entire Marketing Funnel

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Show Targeted Images: In some cases, it might even make sense to modify the imagery leads see on your landing pages and website pages. If you primarily sell to two different groups of people (architects and contractors, for example), and you know that a lead is a contractor from his or her past downloads or page views, why not show that lead relevant images of contractors using your product — images that they can better identify with. Context You Can Gain : Behavioral Data: As prospects move through your website (even on their first visit, before becoming a lead), you are probably collecting web analytics data on their interactions with your site. But is that data stored in aggregate, or is it tied to them as an individual? When they finally do turn into a lead, can their history of page views and important events be applied to their record in your CRM and marketing databases ? Can you use that data to determine their buyer persona and lifecycle stage ?  Lead Intelligence: The first time a lead comes to your website, it’s important to consider how they got there. Are you tracking the channel or campaign that first brought them to your website? If they came to you from a search engine, are you capturing the keyword that introduced them to your brand, as well as the first page they viewed? This can give you important context about their initial interest and what their intentions might be.  Forms & Landing Pages Context You Can Apply Targeted Images and Messaging: Landing pages present a huge opportunity for applying context about a lead, and many of the same rules for applying context to website or blog pages apply to landing pages, too. Targeting images is a great starting point — targeting all of the content on the landing page based on who is seeing it can be even more effective. (Note: This should be something your marketing platform can handle on the back end. In HubSpot, for example, Smart Calls-to-Action that are targeted based on the viewer can direct users to different, targeted variations of your landing pages.) Context You Can Gain Ask More Detailed Questions Over Time: Forms are all about gaining context about your leads. When a prospect or lead is willing to fill out a form, it’s a special moment — you have demonstrated enough value that the prospect is willing to give you some valuable information in return for what you’re offering. But when that special moment occurs, are you taking full advantage of it? Dynamic forms that use a feature called progressive profiling can ensure you never squander that special moment by asking the same question twice. Instead, progressive profiling analyzes what you already know about a lead, and pulls from a queue of questions to ask for details you haven’t already collected. Using progressive profiling is a fantastic way to accumulate more valuable, deep information about your leads over time. Originally published Feb 19, 2013 4:30:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 Lead Generation Email & Marketing Automation  Context You Can Apply Granular Segmentation: This is perhaps the biggest opportunity to leverage what you know about a lead to market to them more effectively. When you have a large volume of data about each lead, you can segment your database more granularly and send closely targeted messages to each segment that better match their interests and where they are in your funnel. Your segmentation might leverage implicit details like lead score, page views, key actions, or responses to specific types of content; it might also leverage explicit details like company size, job title, geography, or other characteristics.  Personalized Message and Sender: You’ve all likely noticed this in the emails you receive — a personalized subject line, and content within that addresses you by your first name, for example. But why stop there? There are plenty of other ways you can personalize the content of an email . For example, you might mention a detail like the lead’s business vertical, geography, or something else that makes the email feel more personal and relevant. Or, if the lead is being worked by a specific sales rep, why not personalize the sender name to make the email appear to be coming directly from the rep the lead already has a relationship with? Context You Can Gain Engagement With Your Messages: This one is fairly obvious. Over the course of an email campaign, tracking which messages (and which parts of each message) resonate with your leads can give you important insight into their interests and where they fall in the buying cycle . For example, if a lead clicks on a link in an email that’s offering them a free consultation, you might infer that they’re further along in the buying process than someone who converts on an offer to download a purely educational ebook about an industry topic.  Your CRM System & Your Sales Process Context You Can Apply Lead Intelligence for Your Sales Team: Over the course of a lead’s journey — from their first encounter with your brand until the point at which they’re ready for sales intervention — you’ve likely collected a lot of data about them that could be valuable to your sales team. Your sales team can likely infer details about a lead’s interests, their level of urgency around a potential purchase, their level of fit for your product, and much more. Since most CRM systems aren’t natively designed to handle the volume and type of data that a marketing campaign is capable of generating, it’s also important for you to consider how you can help surface relevant, interesting details for your sales team. HubSpot, for example, gives your sales team access to a chronologically ordered timeline of lead interactions , along with a way for you to quickly surface the most important details for your sales team. center_img Topics: Context You Can Gain Details From Other Sources: Depending on your sales process and the origin of an individual lead, your CRM system may be full of details you can use to better target and personalize your marketing messages. Think about the context a sales rep could capture during a five-minute conversation with a lead who turns out to be a good fit for your business, but is not yet ready to make a purchase. If your sales team isn’t already capturing that data in a structured way, it may be worth considering if it’s possible to fit capturing these types of details into their workflow.  Social Media Social media is a channel that can’t be personalized in the same way email messages or your website can be personalized, but there are still ways in which you can apply context you have about your leads to the content you share in social media. Context You Can Apply Context From Past Leads as a Whole: Looking at your leads database overall, or leads from past social media conversions , are there things you can infer about your best leads that can help guide your future content strategy? Do certain content offers resonate with more people — or people who represent a best fit lead? Do certain types of offers seem to work best in social media as a channel? Context You Can Gain Behavioral Data: Similar to email, social media presents an opportunity for you collect implicit details about your leads. What offers resonate with your leads? In general, your social media posts should be heavier on content, and lighter on direct pitches or landing pages, but are you able to track when a contact interacts with your content through social media, even if it’s just a click on a link to a blog post and not a conversion on a landing page? With the tools available to marketers today, there are a lot of different ways to optimize your funnel and improve your marketing — from A/B testing button colors and experimenting with PPC bids, to website redesigns and testing different types of blog posts. All of these are important, but few can have the kind of impact across all of your channels in the same way as a concerted effort to share context between your marketing tools, and apply it to the content you create ( HubSpot’s software can do all of the above … wink wink). How big a role does context play in your marketing? In what ways can you improve? When you think about your marketing funnel, how do you think about the work you do to optimize it? You may have never considered it, but a lot of what you probably do is work to minimize the number of breaks in your marketing chain.Ideally, you should be working to carry information and context about your leads throughout the different stages of your funnel — minimizing as many breaks in your marketing chain as possible, and strengthening the impact of your marketing. And today, minimizing breaks in the chain means putting your data to use in as many ways as you can. In this post, we’ll walk you through exactly what this means in a modern-day marketing world — and how you can apply (and gain) context in your individual marketing channels to help you more effectively move leads further and further down the funnel. First, a Brief History of Data-Driven Online Marketing The Early Days of Online Marketing In the early days of online marketing, tools like Google Analytics helped us understand our audience in aggregate. Minimizing breaks in the chain meant figuring out what worked on a high level, and optimizing our marketing to make it more appealing to our audience as a whole. We saw which keywords drove traffic to our website, and we worked to rank higher for those keywords. We saw which pages our prospects were viewing, and we put calls-to-action on those pages. Web analytics fueled a revolution in marketing based on data, but it was marketing in aggregate. In other words, we didn’t have a way to connect the dots between the mass of traffic we were measuring and the real people it represented. The Middle Ages of Online Marketing In what I think of as the middle ages of online marketing, technology took us a step further. We used a lot of different marketing tools — an analytics tool, a CRM system to tap into our sales team’s data, an email marketing tool, a landing page tool, a blogging platform, a social media tool, etc. We could optimize each channel individually — landing pages based on their conversion rates, emails based on their open and clickthrough rates — but sharing data between these individual systems was difficult at best, and often impossible. Wanted to infuse your CRM system with data from your latest email marketing campaign? It was doable, but very manual. Wanted to give your sales team a digestible history of interactions with a lead across all of these tools? Let me know if you ever figured that one out. A Modern Marketing Era Luckily, we’ve entered a modern marketing era where these are solvable problems thanks to integration. With a modern marketing software platform (like HubSpot ), all of your marketing tools talk to one another, right out of the box. (And if you still use many different tools, today you might be able to glue them together with the help of a savvy developer.) Means aside, it’s possible to do things we never would have dreamed of doing just a few, short years ago. Rather than marketing to one audience with one message, we can now market to an audience of one, delivering a consistent, personalized message specific to each individual across every medium . The content you serve to each individual can be tailored based on the context you collect from every channel.There is an important paradigm to dig into here. Every time a lead or a potential lead comes into contact with your brand, you have two opportunities: 1) to learn more about them (acquire context), and 2) to leverage what you already know (apply context to your content). And as we mentioned up top, today, minimizing breaks in your marketing chain means putting your data to use in as many ways as possible. Collecting context, and applying it to your content. Modern Marketing: Context and Content The implications of applying context to your content are huge. Your marketing results improve when you deliver more relevant messages to your prospects based on what you already know about them; and your campaigns are supercharged when you can deliver the same consistent message across every medium your prospects see. You can even have a huge impact on your sales team’s performance. In the same way a snowball grows as it rolls down a hill, you accumulate more and more data about your leads with each and every marketing touch point as they move through your funnel. And when the time is right for your sales team to reach out, that data can be transformative to their processes.Lost on where to start delivering this kind of a personal marketing experience to your leads, prospects, and sales team? Let’s take a look at some real examples of opportunities to gain and apply context with every marketing tool in your arsenal, at every step in the funnel, and through every channel your leads touch.  Website/Blog Content & Calls-to-Action Context You Can Apply Show Targeted Calls-to-Action (CTAs): It goes without saying that your website should have prominent CTAs on every page to encourage visitors to convert into leads — and motivate leads to take the next step. But are those calls-to-action targeted to show your leads an offer they’ve never seen before? Showing your website visitors an offer to download an ebook or whitepaper that a lead has already converted on can be a missed opportunity. Use dynamic, Smart CTAs to show the right content to the right visitors. last_img read more

New Facebook Algorithm Update, Essential Excel Tips for Marketers, and More in HubSpot Content This Week

first_imgAs marketers, we all know that great writing can help our content stand out from the crowd. But in addition to crossing our t’s and dotting our i’s, we need to make sure that we’re balancing our equations and refining our formulas. Yes, my friends: Marketing requires a scientific approach. And the language of science? That’d be “mathematics” (Remember? From high school? It was the class with the numbers and stuff.)This past week on Inbound Hub, we had a statistically significant* number of posts that dealt with the scientific side of inbound. From understanding Facebook’s new algorithm, to putting together pivot tables in Excel, we’ve got the nerdiest of the nerdiest for you to learn about.So, bust out those protractors, adjust your bifocals, and dive into this past week’s worth of wonderful content from the blog.(*Author clearly doesn’t understand what that means)A Scientific Approach to Hitting Your Lead Gen Goals With ContentWhile creating amazing content that resonates with your visitors, leads, and customers alike certainly requires an artistic touch, a scientific approach is also needed to plan and execute that content effectively. In this new post, HubSpot Senior Blog Editor Corey Eridon walks you through the entire process and shows you how reviewing analytics — and measuring performance — can help you hit your lead generation goals.New Facebook Algorithm Update Dings Text Updates From BusinessesUsually, when we read the word “algorithm” in a headline, we brace ourselves for some earth-shattering SEO news from Google. But remember: Facebook has an algorithm too — one that controls what shows up in our News Feeds. The latest change to this algorithm means you’ll be seeing fewer text status updates from companies, as Facebook is putting a heavier emphasis on its “link-share” updates. Learn all about it here.Not Just for Data Geeks? Why Marketers Need to Know ExcelWe inbound marketers loooove our Google Docs … and our Microsoft Word … and our PowerPoint. But, there’s another tool in our inbound arsenal that many of us are guilty of neglecting: Excel. I’m here to tell you that it’s easier than you think! Mastering Excel will give you a whole new skill set and help you unlock insights that are crucial for your business’s success. 10 Stats About Inbound Marketing That Will Make Your Jaw DropDid you know that 75% of searchers never scroll past the first page of search results? Or that visitors only spend 10 seconds on a homepage before leaving if they don’t like what they see? Dive deeper into these intriguing stats and learn several more in this new post from our Insiders section.Should Your SEO Strategy Include Yahoo and Bing?Google has become so ubiquitous in the world of search that we regularly use it as a verb. And while many marketers focus solely on Google when crafting an SEO strategy, they shouldn’t forget that other search engines are out there, like Bing and Yahoo (heard of ’em?). So, should you be optimizing for other search engines in addition to Google? We explore all the angles in this new post.Who Needs Google? Mark Cuban Says He’s Using It Less and LessSpeaking of search engines, do we even need them? In a new post in our Opinion section, Dan Lyons dissects a recent comment from billionaire investor and entrepreneur Mark Cuban. According to Cuban, Google (and other search engines) are failing to index the most important information: the information that’s being created and shared on social sites like Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Tumblr, and Snapchat. A Proven Framework for Prospecting Emails [+20 Free Email Examples]In a recent post in our Sales section, HubSpot Director of Marketing for Inbound Sales Brian Whalley lays out a three-part process for successful email prospecting. In the post, you’ll not only get to read a HubSpot-tested sales email, but also the opportunity to download 20 more.What was the most interesting thing you learned this week on Inbound Hub? What do you want to see more of? Leave your feedback in the comments! Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Facebook Marketing Originally published Jan 26, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

5 Key Digital Marketing Hires Every Publisher Needs to Make

first_imgPublishers should be natural leaders in content marketing. Providing high quality, authoritative content is already your stock in trade. While quality content is a fundamental requirement of successful digital marketing, it’s not enough in and of itself.You also need to develop, promote, distribute, and monitor compelling digital content campaigns for you, and your advertisers. These needs have spawned new marketing roles. Ready to grow your team in the right direction?Here Are Five Hires Key to Your Publication’s Digital Marketing Success:Social Media SpecialistYou need a social media presence to distribute your content and grow your audience. Since social media is often the first line of interaction with your audience, it’s become too important (and potentially risky) to leave this role to the interns.Your content marketing team will provide the core fuel, your content. Yet there’s so much more to social media than just posting links to your publication’s content. Your social media specialist will often have to react in real time — whether it’s to report on fast-breaking industry news, respond to people who expect an immediate response, or share other authoritative content. Social media requires constant monitoring and interaction to be effective. Remember that accuracy, authenticity, and objectivity are the cornerstones upon which you’ll build your publication’s reputation for credibility and authority.Skills needed: Proficient writer, early adopter, quick learner, personable nature, good judgment, familiarity with each social media channel’s policies, conversant with intellectual property (copyrights, trademarks, etc.) and privacy laws as well as applicable FTC regulations, and a firm grasp on your company’s voice and communications policies.Marketing AnalystContent marketing is filled with metrics and data. Expert analysis of that data allows your marketing team to make good decisions. Having someone on-staff who can turn your data into knowledge with actionable insights is a huge advantage before, during, and after any campaign.Your marketing data specialist should help managers improve campaign performance with their analysis by identifying the strategies and tactics worth prioritizing, as well as those that need revision. Content marketing is a long haul process that requires continuous monitoring and testing of iterations to find the right formula for success. Data analysis informs those choices.Skills needed: Statistical analysis, comfortable with software tools, strong reporting and presentation skills. You may want a specialist already proficient in the marketing data platform you’re using. Communication skills are a must if you want to translate data into action. Managers can’t act on what they don’t understand.Marketing Automation SpecialistWith the right software in place, marketing automation, or workflows, enable you to mine the richness in your contact database and optimize it with your website and email. They help make your content creation and distribution repeatable, scalable, and cost efficient. With the proper automation specialist and software, you can:Deliver a customized experience to a visitor based on what they do on your website.Create dynamic static and smart lists used in various marketing automation campaigns that go beyond simple email blasts such as product alerts and newsletters, to tailored emails that reflect a lead’s behaviors and preferences, synced in time with where the lead is within their buying journey.Skills needed: Strong strategic background and ability to map out complex procceses, analysis, logic, superb attention to detail, project management, interpersonal skills, comprehensive understanding of audience segmentation and familiarity/light experience with web development. If your company uses marketing automation and content optimization systems, then your workflow specialist should be an expert in them as well.Content Marketing ManagerYour content marketing campaign strategist oversees content creation and the people developing it. His or her overarching responsibility is to recognize the content themes and channels that meet the needs of the campaign, uncover any content gaps, and fill them. This person should work closely with your Marketing Analyst to direct changes to the content made in the wake of reporting, and enforce the quality of the content produced. He or she should ensure that all published digital content is search-engine optimized.Skills needed: Project management, SEO, strong-writer/editor, strategic thinking, and interpersonal skills. You’ll recognize many of these skills as needed by any traditional campaign manager.But there is a new layer of skills needed in a digital content marketing campaign strategist:Detailed understanding of a complete persona, more than just an audience memberInstinct for identifying digital content mediums and topics compelling to that personaAbility to keep up with the evolving opportunities and challenges of the digital content marketing approachIntegrated Campaign Project ManagerA holistic content marketing campaign promotes and distributes content through multiple channels. Think of them as your human-API, communicating and tying the different pieces of your marketing together. These channels may cover both traditional and digital media. Your integrated campaign project manager coordinates all the aspects of a multi-channel approach, including:Customizing the content across the appropriate channels and the targeted personaOwning the campaign calendar setting out the where, when, and what of each campaign elementMonitoring the contact database to avoid list fatigueTracking the performance of specific channelsManaging the media budgetSkills needed: A Deep understanding of different media channels and their purpose, project and budget management, data analysis, and presentation skills. Your integrated campaign manager should also have expertise in any marketing automation tools being used. There’s no set formula for marketing success, but these roles are a great place to start when recruiting for your company. Even if you don’t have the budget to onboard five new hires, look for people with traits that mirror those mentioned in two-or three of the skill sets listed above. No matter where you net out when building your team, keeping these potential positions in mind will help you propel your digital publishing efforts forward. Marketing Jobs Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Jul 13, 2015 7:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Topics:last_img read more

How to ‘Un-Stock’ Your Photography: 8 Examples That’ll Change the Way You Choose Photos

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Aug 22, 2016 8:00:00 AM, updated January 18 2019 With 46% of marketers reporting that photography is critical to their current marketing and storytelling strategies, it should come as no surprise that quality photos are in high demand.Trouble is, most commercially available photos on the internet were taken to visualize broad overall concepts rather than concrete messages. That means they can be used in all sorts of campaigns … but also end up looking generic.Think of all the photos of smiling receptionists and perfectly suited business leaders you’ve come across. These images may compete for attention, but often fail to register, simply because your customers can’t identify with them.Download the free stock photos you’ve been searching for here, no attribution required.As a marketer, you can cut through the noise by using images that more closely relate to your audience. It’s what we call “real photography” here at EyeEm: Unique captures, delightful moments, and surprising perspectives. Images that are more concrete will resonate with audiences much more powerfully since they show real life rather than staged situations.To visualize what we mean, we put together a handful of generic images alongside a ‘real’ counterpart sourced from our community of photographers. The proof is in the pictures, but we’ll let you see for yourself …(HubSpot customers — get access to 60,000 totally free Shutterstock photos right within your portal by clicking here.)Free Download: How to Use Photos in Marketing8 Examples of Authentic Imagery For Your Campaigns1) BusinessWhen it comes to business-related photos, there’s no shortage of clichés. Rather than deciding on an overly clean, generic image like the one below of the woman holding an “open” sign, dig deeper for something more authentic — something that tells a story.You’ll notice that our suggestion ties in a more personal side of business by highlighting two people working together on a project. You can see the emotion in the woman’s face, as she uses her hands to explain something to her coworker in a seemingly authentic exchange. Do This:Source: Sebastian Kopp via EyeEmNot This:Source: Pexels2) TechnologyTechnology is notoriously hard to visualize, since a concept like “connectivity” is quite abstract. Old-school stock photography usually puts people next to the tech to achieve that connection, but the results are clumsy and constructed. Or worse, they add in a weird futuristic digital overlay like the image below.Our suggestion is inspired by contemporary social media culture — and it’s more recognizable. It also features soft focus, natural lighting, and it shows a person truly interacting with the technology.Do This:Source: Moritz Otto via EyeEmNot This:Source: 123rf.com3) TravelLet’s be honest: When we the last time you went on vacation hoping to come home with a suitcase full of sand? In many cases, travel photos are just plain corny, and they lack the excitement and sense of wonder that comes with exploring new places.These days, customers’ attention can much more effectively be captured by showing the actual experience of travel, as depicted by our suggestion below. The shot shows the view from a window on an airplane. It captures that thrilling feeling of embarking on a trip — a feeling that many people can easily relate to.Do This:Source: Dina Alfasi via EyeEmNot This:Souce: 123rf.com4) HappinessAccording to one study, pictures with smiling faces can positively impact conversions. Trouble is, while picturing happiness with a simple smile might have worked in the past, it has long become a tired cliché.While the image of the group of people smiling in brightly colored shirts feels forced, our suggestion reads more natural, as it radiates a positive emotion while including an interesting element of movement. The image looks like a snapshot, taken in a genuine moment of fun and togetherness.Do This:Source: Sasha Dudkina via EyeEmNot This:Source: 123rf.com5) OfficeRepresenting an office by the tools one might (or might not) use there looks incredibly staged. It’s better to show context.In this case, the image we suggested shows a creative space of a freelancer, with a pleasing color palette to underline the tranquility and focus of the workplace. Do This:Source: @dersash via EyeEmNot This:Source: Pexels6) PhoneMost images of phones show people awkwardly handling them, presenting their devices in a way nobody in real life would. Exhibit A: The image below of a young girl holding up her phone with a blank screen. Now, notice how our suggestion sets highlights the phone without feeling forced or cheesy. The person in the image is shown using the phone in a really natural way, and it’s easy to identify with — after all, who doesn’t love taking photos of their pets?Do This:Source: Markus Spiering via EyeEmNot This:Source: Pexels7) ProductivityBeing productive isn’t about doing many things at once, as the photo on the left suggests — but about focus and a clear sense of what matters. (Check out this free guide for tips on how to be more productive.)While the stock photo below is just plain creepy, our suggestion shows a woman at work, with her focus being underlined by the headphone she wears. It also uses much softer, natural light to remind the viewer how common this activity is.Do This:Source: @jedrzej via EyeEmNot This:Source: 123rf.com8) LeadershipLeadership is all about building trust and establishing credibility. Unfortunately, leadership-inspired photos often miss the mark.The photo below portrays an artificial and thereby very conventional idea of what leadership looks like. To combat that, we choose an image that while more loosely related to the idea, manages to demonstrate the emotive aspect of leading someone.Do This:Source: Kirk Tang via EyeEmNot This:Source: 123rf.com Topics: Imageslast_img read more