A Plea For More Frisbee Data From A US Ultimate Coach

The few dabbles with this kind of data are intriguing. The chart next to this paragraph, which was put together by Sean Childers and is also in Carl’s piece, shows the chances of scoring from different parts of the field. It’s no surprise that the closer you are to the end zone, the better your chances of scoring are. But see that bow in the 40 percent range? Sean’s data — limited as it is — suggests that a team is just as likely to score from 50 yards outside the end zone in the middle of the field as it is from the sidelines 35 yards away. That’s actionable intelligence and confirms what I’ve gathered from years of experience — when you’re stuck on the sideline, bad things happen. (That’s why my advice to our defense against Great Britain was so focused on sideline strategy.)I would love to have other hunches of mine confirmed or disproved in this way. Am I justified in thinking that passes that “break the mark,”2Usually a defense tries to funnel offensive flow to one side of the field. Breaking the mark means that the offense is throwing passes to where the defense doesn’t want it to. no matter how small, have a cumulative effect of loosening up the defense, the way that Barcelona’s incessant tiki-taka style creates enough small cracks that eventually a big scoring opportunity emerges? It’s midway through the first half against Great Britain and they are scoring too easily. As a coach of the U.S. under-23 men’s Ultimate Frisbee team, I’d scouted the British team in an earlier game. Now, after watching the first 5 points of our semifinal match at this summer’s world championships, my fellow coaches and I gathered the team’s defensive line in a huddle: Their handlers are really comfortable throwing the around breaks, so let’s shift our marks to the backfield and make them throw the inside flick to a tight window. (For the 99 percent of you who didn’t get that: Basically, let’s position our defense in such a way that the only option for their throwers is a difficult forehand throw to a well-covered receiver.)The strategy happened to work: Deprived of easy, short passes, the British team began to take riskier and riskier long throws. Eventually, the percentages tilted in our favor, and we won by 3 points. We were on our way to a gold medal.That strategy, though, was basically put together on improvisation and a hunch. As my colleague Carl Bialik writes elsewhere on FiveThirtyEight, there isn’t much data in ultimate to help coaches like me.I can imagine a day, maybe at the 2025 world championships, when a brilliant coaching insight1And/or lucky guess. would emerge from a data set, displayed in a crisp chart on my iPad 12 (hologram edition). It would show which spots on the field the other team’s main throwers have trouble completing passes to. Another would reveal, say, that one of our players has a much higher completion rate along the forehand side than the backhand side. “Let’s run plays to that side of the field for him,” we, the brilliant coaches, would say.But having more data in my coaching arsenal is only the first step. Players don’t always absorb data-driven feedback easily.This isn’t unique to ultimate. Even in basketball, the players like Shane Battier who explicitly embrace analytics and can probably speak the language of usage rate and points per possession are rare.So coaches have to adjust their language. Players can better process “he doesn’t want to go right” than execute on “when positioned within 3 feet of the left elbow, your matchup’s shooting percentage decreases by 32 percentage points.” When I was playing top-level ultimate, I was much more effective on the field when the only thing running through my head was “screw these guys — let’s beat ’em.”But the job of a coach is to bridge the gap between a player’s lizard brain and the stat sheet. I’d love the challenge of having to translate analytics into simple language that gets my players out-performing, not over-thinking. Quick movement from FC Barcelona and Seattle Sockeye What about my intuition that after five or six passes, an offense is usually so tired that it’s better to try to score in one long pass than to continue grinding away 3 yards at a time? You may notice that those two hunches might actually be at odds with each other. This is why we need the data! Send in the nerds.CORRECTION (Dec. 16, 9:22 a.m.): An earlier version of this article incorrectly referred to Great Britain’s ultimate team as the English team throughout. Read more: Ultimate Frisbee Is In The Dark Ages Of Analytics — And It Wants To Escape read more

Fabinho responds to talk about leaving Liverpool

first_imgLiverpool midfielder Fabinho insists he has no intention of leaving the club despite rumors of a move back to France to join Paris Saint-Germain.The former AS Monaco man is still getting used to life in England after having signed for Liverpool from Monaco in the summer transfer window.Fabinho has had to wait for regular first team chance under Jurgen Klopp this season. The Brazilian got his first of English league football when he came on as a substitute during the 1-0 win over Huddersfield back in October.He has since found a way to overcome a slow start and becoming a more regular appearances in the first team for Klopp’s men.However, news of a potential departure from Liverpool next season coupled with French champions PSG touted as a possible destination but for now though, the player himself has insisted that he has no reason to try and quit the Merseyside club.Asked about the PSG reports, Fabinho told UOL, as quoted by FourFourTwo: divock origi, liverpoolReport: Origi cause Klopp injury concerns George Patchias – September 14, 2019 Divock Origi injury in today’s game against Newcastle is a cause for concern for Jurgen Klopp.Perhaps with one eye on Tuesday’s trip to Italy…“I was told there was something in the press, but I never said I’d like to leave Liverpool.”“I knew I would need to have the patience to wait for my moment. I’m happy at Liverpool. There is no reason for me to leave.”Fabinho also spoke about the number of minutes he is receiving so far on the pitch saying:“He [Klopp] didn’t give me a lot of explanations but I talked in training so I wouldn’t be discouraged and to stay focused on my work, without letting my head drop.”“I knew it was a passing moment. I didn’t keep moaning and crying. I tried to work because I knew opportunities would come. Now I just want to increase my number of games.”last_img read more

Web 20 and the Heartbreak of Algorithmia

Nevertheless, I have to confess some discomfort with the digital revolution as it has unfolded to date, and with those who take delight in all its works.  At some of the forums on interactive media at the recent South by Southwest Conference, the air was thick with self-congratulation, and the phrase “careless plunder” kept coming to mind.There is obviously a great deal to celebrate about the Internet and the promise of digital broadband, especially a vast increase in access to knowledge, global communications and opportunity. But there is much that should give us pause as well, including the absence so far of a healthy business model for content creators and publishers. “How long is too long to wait?” Jaron Lanier asks on behalf of Internet-starved musicians in his new book, You Are Not a Gadget. “Isn’t 15 years long enough to wait before we switch from hope to empiricism?”The most promising new business models for journalism are not promising at all. Consider “content farms” like Demand Media, a factory of drive-by, slave-wage piecework on such enervating nano-topics as the best way to unbend knitting needles or scour a soiled hubcap. Why such subjects? There is an algorithm for that: Simply mine billions of search results, match keyword results to ad-adjacency rates, then cross-ruff the likeliest terms with their search rankings and assign the result to reporters ($15 per piece), videographers ($20), a copy editor ($2.50) and a fact-checker ($1). Demand Media publishes 4,000 articles and video clips every day. Their goal for next year is a million a month.Demand Media started out doing its work the usual way, but its editors lost their jobs when it was discovered that the algorithm could do all the assigning while delivering almost five times the revenue and 20 times the profit. Presto: “You can take something that is thought of as a creative process,” the algorithm’s inventor told Wired, “and turn it into a manufacturing process.”A New Social DiseaseWhat we have here may be the early symptoms of a new social disease—call it algorithmia—in which the magic of literally unthinkable, computer-enabled mathematics can mesmerize the culture, just as it dazzled the best minds of Wall Street and nearly took down the U.S. economy.The Internet’s principle effect on commerce has been disintermediation, a fittingly clinical term for cutting out the middle of the supply chain between producer and consumer.  But the holy algorithms of Web 2.0 enable an even more fateful and ugly disruption: the disintermediation of content and meaning.We can comfort ourselves with the thought that more people are reading more “news” than ever before, but in fact most real news is still being reported by our increasingly enfeebled newspapers, and our common wealth of information is declining as their staffs do. What has really increased is dissemination and opinion, a lot of reheated rephrasings meant to thicken the aggregatorial stew.It is difficult to see the way from here to a more humane digital world, but it is not hard to see some aspects of the business model that will get us there: It will place the power of granting significance back into human hands, reward the pursuit of truth and beauty and put digits to the work of hearts and minds. James R. Gaines is the founder of Story River Media, a Washington, D.C.-based publisher devoted to interactive multimedia story-telling across all digital platforms for corporate, government, non-profit and publishing clients. He is the former managing editor of TIME, Life and People magazines, and was corporate editor of Time Inc. “On the one hand, information wants to be expensive, because it’s so valuable…On the other hand, information wants to be free, because the cost of getting it out is getting lower and lower all the time. So you have these two fighting against each other.” [Emphasis added]So said Stewart Brand at the first Hackers’ Conference, in 1984. In its entirety, the statement was true and far-sighted, but most of it has been forgotten. That famous italicized fragment, taken out of context, became the call-to-arms of an ideology loosely known as Web 2.0, embracing a broad challenge to principles of copyright, the concept of intellectual property and the usefulness and viability of “old media.” The fight that Brand predicted now verges on cultural war.Despite my long background at Time Inc., I have sometimes sided with those who blithely blame “old media” for their own distress, faulting them for blindness, arrogance and failure to adapt. As someone who has moved into digital publishing myself, I have a stake in the success of the new models that threaten their existence.Online Arrogance read more

Avengers Endgame will mark Stan Lees last Marvel movie cameo

first_img 0 Captain Marvel Stan Lee Marvel Spiderman Thor The Avengers Every Stan Lee Marvel movie cameo Stan Lee plays a hilarious intergalactic barber in the 2017 movie Thor: Ragnarok. Marvel Whenever a new Marvel movie came out, fans had fun trying to spot Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee on the big screen. Lee guest-starred in over 20 Marvel movies — as well as in various TV shows, video games and comics. Lee has appeared as everything from a bus driver to a librarian alongside the comic book characters he created over the years.But since Lee’s death at age 95 in 2018, it’s been unclear how many more posthumous cameos would be granted to the late, great comic book creator, until now. “It’s his last one committed to film,” Avengers: Endgame director Joe Russo told the media on press day in Los Angeles Saturday.  Most recently, Lee had a touching posthumous cameo in Captain Marvel reading a script of director Kevin Smith’s 1995 movie Mallrats, which Lee starred in as himself.Some fans speculated that the upcoming Spider-Man: Far From Home, which hits theaters in July, would feature Lee’s final cameo, especially since Russo told the press earlier this month that “I don’t remember if he was well enough to do the cameo in Homecoming or not.”  Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment Originally published 2:36 p.m. PT.  Stan Lee dies at 95: A look back at his most iconic characters on screen Tags Lee’s Captain Marvel cameo made Kevin Smith a ‘blubbering mess’ Star-studded tribute to Lee: He ‘made us proud to be misfits’ Lee’s Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse cameo will warm your heart 4:51 More Stan Lee 18 Photos Share your voice TV and Movies While it’s bittersweet to learn that Lee’s last hurrah in the MCU is coming up fast, the the extra-long run time for the upcoming Avengers: Endgame movie could mean that Marvel might give Lee more than one appearance in the three-hour movie. “I have to say, I think it’s astonishing that this would be his last cameo,” Russo added. “It’s just kind of mind-boggling that he made it to the end of this run. I can’t believe it.”tec0280-cmp-v006-1037Stan Lee is dressed as an astronaut in the 2017 movie Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Marvel After all, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 allowed for not one but two moments in the film where Lee — dressed as an astronaut — is seen discussing his past adventures with various interested aliens referred to as the Watchers.  Avengers: Endgame is scheduled to open in theaters worldwide on April 26. For more Avengers: Endgame plot theories, characters reveals and news check out our Avengers: Endgame movie guide. If you want to catch every Lee cameo in the MCU movies before the Endgame begins, here’s our guide to streaming all the movies online.last_img read more

Uber ebikes Shorter rides more earnings

first_imgREUTERS/Toby Melville/Illustration/File PhotoUber plans to switch its focus to electric bikes and scooter over car despite the fact that the company will suffer loss initially. Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO, said that it is difficult plus time taking for cars to go inside the narrow streets of a city and that is where the demand for electric bikes occurs.It has spent around $200m for its new e-bike business this year and the investment will continue despite the losses. “In the short term, it might cost us but in long-term it would add huge profit and that is where we exactly want to head,” said  Khosrowshahi.Uber operates its e-bike business in around 8 cities in the USA, including New York and Washington and soon they will launch its bike business in  European cities Berlin, being the first city. The revenue at first will be less but it will grow in long-term once the users are friendly with the same.At first, the uber drivers were not very convinced about the idea until they got to know that their short rides would be replaced by the long rides and more earnings. Renting bikes and scooters will earn them less profit than cars but it will cover the profit by replacing the long rides for short rides. “We are willing to trade off short-term per-unit economics for long-term higher engagement,” CEO told the FT.Uber is making good revenue from the taxi business but its expansion into new areas of e-bike and scooters has added losses to it at a great rate. David Brophy, professor of finance at the University of Michigan, told Reuters that the firm could expect to see its valuation slashed in a public listing if it did not show more progress towards becoming profitable.According to BBC, the basic cost of hiring a scooter is about $1 (76p). Riders pay more the further they travel.last_img read more

Rohingyas elect female camp leaders

first_imgRecently arrived Rohingyas living in the Shalbagan-Nayapara camp in Cox’s Bazar district, for the first time, have selected their own camp committee, led by women.The election in Shalbagan camp is a pilot project under the community governance process, an initiative taken by the UN refugee agency UNHCR in partnership with ADRA and Bangladeshi local authorities.Rohingyas living in Shalbagan chose their own camp committee consisting of a chief, a deputy, an assistant, a general member and 12 block representatives.The elected camp leader, deputy leader and half of all block representatives are female.“This is a remarkable achievement. Rohingya refugees in Shalbagan have spoken and decided they want 50 per cent of their representatives to be women. They should be congratulated on this,” said Bernadette Castel-Hollingsworth, UNHCR’s Senior Protection Coordinator in Cox’s Bazar.This is the first time elections for camp leaders have been rolled out to ensure community representation in areas where recently-arrived Rohingya refugees, who fled violence in Myanmar, are living.“This election marks a transition to a more democratic form of representation,” said Bangladesh’s Refugee Relief and Repatriation Commissioner Mohammad Abdul Kalam.“Through the election, the voices of people will have a firmer ground to communicate gaps in services and their needs,” he said.The camp committee selection process at Shalbagan began seven weeks ago with refugees nominating 20 candidates who were then screened against eligibility criteria.The newly-elected refugee committee began work this week, starting with capacity-building plans supported by UNHCR, humanitarian partners and local authorities.As part of the Community Governance Process, Camp Committee elections are intended to be rolled out across other refugee sites in the coming months.last_img read more

Worlds highest bridge opens in China

first_imgThe world’s highest bridge has opened to traffic in China, connecting two provinces in the mountainous southwest and reducing travel times by as much as three-quarters, local authorities said Friday.The Beipanjiang Bridge soars 565 metres (1,854 feet) above a river and connects the two mountainous provinces of Yunnan and Guizhou, the Guizhou provincial transport department said in a statement on its official website.The bridge cut travel times between Xuanwei in Yunnan to Shuicheng in Guizhou from more than four hours to around one, a truck driver surnamed Duan was quoted by the official news agency Xinhua as saying after the bridge opened Thursday.It was “very convenient for people who want to travel between these two places”, he added.The 1,341-metre span cost over 1 billion yuan ($144 million) to build, according to local newspaper Guizhou Daily.It overtook the Si Du River Bridge in the central province of Hubei to become the world’s highest bridge, a separate statement by the provincial transport department said earlier.Several of the world’s highest bridges are in China, although the world’s tallest bridge—measured in terms of the height of its own structure, rather than the distance to the ground—remains France’s Millau viaduct at 343 metres.last_img read more