Jumbos to patrol Odisha’s Satkosia Tiger Reserve

first_imgPatrolling in the Satkosia Tiger Reserve is set to be strengthened as two trained elephants would be deployed there shortly.Trained elephants will help ground-level forest guards patrol deep in the forest where jeeps cannot go.The two elephants are being brought from the Similipal Tiger Reserve.“We are mobilising a few trained elephants as per the guidelines of the National Tiger Conservation Authority. The elephant deployment in STR at present has no connection with the possible release of tigress Sundari, imported from Madhya Pradesh, from the special enclosure set up inside Satkosia,” said Sandeep Tripathi, Principal Chief Conservator Forest (Wildlife).Sources in the Forest and Environment Department said the authorities did not want to leave any stone unturned before approaching the NTCA for resuming the ambitious tiger reintroduction programme in Satkosia.The tiger reintroduction programme in STR had run into rough weather following the death of India’s first inter-State translocated tiger last year.The Odisha government had planned to bring six tigers (three male and three female) from Madhya Pradesh to increase the feline population in Satkosia. Last year, one pair of big cats was brought to Satkosia.However, the programme did not go as per plan. While the tiger T1 reportedly died after falling into a poaching trap, there was huge discontentment among villagers residing in the buffer areas over the frequent straying of the tigress into human habitation. As the situation went out of control following a human kill, the tigress was captured. Subsequently, the programme was put on hold.last_img read more

A different approach

first_imgP2.5 B shabu seized in Makati sting, Chinese national nabbed Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Recognized by Fiba in the 2014 World Cup in Spain as the world’s best fans, Filipinos went to all forms of media last year, blasting the NBA when it initially refused to allow Clarkson to suit up in the Jakarta Asiad.The SBP, Panlilio earlier said, has already greased the wheels for Clarkson’s appeal. The national basketball federation is also expected to lobby the PBA board to allow Andray Blatche to suit up as an import in the Commissioner’s Cup so Gilas Pilipinas can prepare with him earlier.But like the Clarkson bid, the SBP could face an uphill battle for Blatche, a knowledgeable source told the Inquirer, one that could focus on a single inch.“If at all, Blatche would be subject to the rules governing imports in every conference,” said the source. “That means, even his height will be checked.”The Commissioner’s Cup allows imports no taller than 6-foot-10. Though the league hasn’t officially measured Blatche, the former NBA player is listed as a shade over 6-11.ADVERTISEMENT Lacson backs proposal to elect president and vice president in tandem Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES P2.5 B shabu seized in Makati sting, Chinese national nabbed The SBP is hoping to pair Blatche with Clarkson in the World Cup, which Gilas Pilipinas recently booked tickets to in the last window of Fiba’s Asian qualifiers.But with Clarkson granted only naturalized status despite his Filipino lineage, that pairing cannot materialize without a successful appeal. Clarkson acquired his Philippine passport after the required Fiba cutoff of 16 years old.“We have committed to do our best (in seeking reconsideration from Fiba),” he said. “There are no assurances of guarantees. It’s up to them.”The NBA will be out of the way in the Clarkson case in the coming World Cup with its season long concluded by the time China hosts the event in eight cities from Aug. 31 to Sept. 15.Blatche, on the other hand, has just a few more games in China before he flies home to the US. If he is allowed to play as import, he will head here.But not having obtained a passport before he was 16 years old disqualifies Clarkson from playing as a Filipino, and this is something that the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas and president Al Panlilio will appeal.“I don’t think there’s a single Filipino who doesn’t want Jordan Clarkson to play (with Gilas),” national coach Yeng Guiao said. “All of us want him. But it’s up to the process and what we can do about it.”Guiao, incidentally, doesn’t want his squad to be satisfied by just making the main draw.The mercurial coach is hoping for a favorable draw come March 15 in Shezhen, and have “photo ops” with powerhouse the United States later to be able to make the next round of the 32-nation conclave.“(If we get) bracketed with the US (in the first phase), then we can do nothing about it but have photos taken with them,” Guiao said with a smile in a press conference at Meralco. “But if we can get wins to advance, we’ll take that.” Kaya settles for draw in Vientiane Trump campaign, GOP groups attack Google’s new ad policy 1 dead, 3 injured in Quezon road crash SEA Games hosting troubles anger Duterte National coach Yeng Guiao (left) addresses the media during a presscon hosted by the Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas where telecommunications tycoon and Gilas Pilipinas patron Manny V. Pangilinan and SBP president Al Panlilio (right) gave updates on the national squad. —AUGUST DELA CRUZWith the clamor for Jordan Clarkson to play as a Filipino for Gilas Pilipinas in the World Cup later this year as loud as it could get from this cage-crazy nation, the country’s top basketball patron on Thursday said that the best approach at this time would be “a quiet one.”Telecommunications chief Manny V. Pangilinan, a member of the powerful central board of the international cage body (Fiba), knows exactly how the ruling committee behaves and wants the appeal for Clarkson to follow a more toned-down process.ADVERTISEMENT Hong Kong tunnel reopens, campus siege nears end “Certainly, we would do our best to persuade them (Fiba, to allow Clarkson to play),” Pangilinan said. “Probably, the best approach would be a quiet one rather than create some noise.”It is a tack different from the one that got the NBA to release Clarkson for national duty in last year’s Asian Games, where a very vocal Samahang Basketbol ng Pilipinas (SBP) and a public clamor that dominated social media drew a favorable response for the Philippines.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSUrgent reply from Philippine ‍football chiefSPORTSPalace wants Cayetano’s PHISGOC Foundation probed over corruption chargesBut does that mean that Pangilinan would want what Fiba had said was the world’s greatest fans to be quiet?“No, not at all,” said SBP president Al Panlilio. “What he means is that as a federation, we (the SBP) would want an approach that is not head-on.” View comments Private companies step in to help SEA Games hosting PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games PLAY LIST 02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss MOST READlast_img read more

Steve Jobs & Guy Kawasaki — Powerpoint Best Practices

first_img Originally published Jan 18, 2007 1:27:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Presentations I have recently come across some interesting Powerpoint best practices that I thought I would share with you. Steve JobsThe first best practice was from watching Steve Jobs’ presentation at MacWorld this year.  What was fascinating about his slides is that they were either just a picture or just a picture with a couple of words in extremely large font.  It turns out that Steve wants the audience to listen to him tell the story, rather than read the slides. Here’s a picture of one of Steve’s slides:In contrast to Steve’s slide show, here’s a picture of a slide from Michael Dell.  Michael’s would work well if it were designed to be sent to someone who would not have the benefit of hearing the story live, but next to Steve’s slides, they just seem cluttered.Guy KawasakiI recently read Guy Kawasaki’s “Art of The Start.”  In addition to being a good author/blogger, Guy was one of the very early Apple employees and more recently has been a venture/angel investor type where he has listened to countless Powerpoint presentations.  Presumably because he is tired of seeing poor Powerpoint presentations, he spends many pages in his book talking about Powerpoint best practices.  There were a few nuggets of Powerpoint wisdom among a lot of content about it that stuck with me a few days after finishing the book.His mantra is that Powerpoint should follow a 10/20/30 Rule.  There should be no more than 10 slides in the presentation — very few people take away much more than one concept from a presentation, so all that other stuff is extra.  The slide presentation should be designed to last 20 minutes, leaving room for ample questions/discussion between slides or after the presentation.  Guy points out that the point of the presentation is typically to initiate a discussion.  He says the font should be size should be no smaller than 30 (Arial font).  Guy says that audiences read faster than you can talk, so that while you are up there talking, they are trying to read your slides and not listening to what you are saying.He says that there are something like 60 animation features within Powerpoint and he recommends the less use of it the better.  His advice is to use your voice/body to emphasize when a point is important, not some fancy Powerpoint trick.  The only place he recommends using any of this is in going through bullet points on a slide, presumably to avoid having people read ahead.  Speaking of bullets, Guy suggests that bulleted slides should have one point with bullets and only one layer of bullets (lest you violate the 30 part of 10/20/30).If you have some great Powerpoint tips, please do share them with us…– Brian Halligan.last_img read more

HubSpot TV – Combining Real Life and Social Media with Guest Tim Hayden

first_imgEpisode #61 – October 9, 2009  (Episode Length: 28 minutes, 58 seconds) http://itunes.hubspot.tv/ Headlines Marketing Takeaway , @ mvolpe Marketing Takeaway Doing It Right with www.HubSpot.tv FTC Confirms Bloggers Need Not Fear the $11,000 Fines Registration Link: – Your offline events can stimulate online conversation. gameplanhayden If PR Dead? The Debate Continues… — Details: and @ Download HubSpot’s Inbound Marketing University online training program Thepremise is simple: visitors “light” a candle and leave a message. 8599as of Thursday at 4PM – less than 48 hours after it went live Yahoo finally joins Google and stops using meta keywords for search Time 3:00-5:30pm Forum Fodder Location: Brogan Room at HubSpot HQ http://hubspotbook.eventbrite.com/ HuSpot TV Guest: Tim Hayden! Brian Halligan’s article: Is PR dead? Think about using in person events to enhance the online communications you are using for inbound marketing. in Austin, TX Announcement! First 50 people get a free book! FTC Regulates Endorsements and Reviews We Are Better Than This Closing Make great content, get more links, don’t sweat meta keywords. Date: October 16 Justin Goodman @electricmice: How to interact on Twitter: @ Originally published Oct 11, 2009 7:49:00 PM, updated July 04 2013 : Set your employees free! Encourage them to be content creators. Death to Meta Keywords! Doors open at 3:00pm. The show goes live at 4:00pm. Come meet Brian andDharmesh at the end of the show during the book signing.  – Make sure your PR firm is doing more than SPAMing reporters with press releases. Yahoo Search No Longer Uses Meta Keywords Tag Technology, in which 54% of thesample of 1,400 CIOs of companies with 100 or more employees blockemployees from accessing any social media at work” Intro Inbound Marketing Book Launch Party at HubSpot TV : Be upfront and honest, and encourage your fans to do the same. “astudy released yesterday by Robert Half Perks: CEO of Marketing Takeaway: Subscribe in iTunes: Why the 54% of companies blocking access to social media should knock it off http://www.ftc.gov/os/2009/10/091005endorsementguidesfnnotice.pdf IMU includes The Role of PR Firms in Social Media and Inbound Marketing in your tweet. Free Inbound Marketing University Online Training Program 54% of companies BLOCK social media If I have hundreds of landing pages, how should you incorporate them into your navigation? 11 free webinar classes and notesheets GamePlan Marketing Takeaway 2 Marketing Takewaway karenrubin “So,is pr dead? Well, the bad news is that as the game has beentraditionally played, it is probably dead or near dead. The good newsis that there is a major opportunity for new entrants and forwardthinking existing agencies to re-invent the industry and provide awhole new set of valuable businesses for their customers.” . The program drills into each component of inbound marketing and prepares you for the Inbound Marketing certification exam. Marketing Tip of the Week: FTC Cracks Down on Blogger Payola, Celebrity Tweets Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Avoiding the 5 Pitfalls of Free Content

first_img 4. Use Your Free Content to Build the Value of Your Business What are some other ways you can get the most out of the content you give away? One way to convince newcomers of your content’s quality is by using numbers. Advertising that “o or that John asks a question that your prospects might also ask themselves: “How good can something that’s free Originally published May 17, 2011 9:00:00 AM, updated March 21 2013 According to John, the five problems with free content are: intelligence is a great way to signal your content’s quality using As inbound marketers, it is important to be aware of the potential pitfalls of giving away free content and the strategies we can use to effectively leverage it. 1. Create Accountability Eroded Value 2. Build a Reputation for Quality If you provide lots of quality content over time and give it away for free, the value of your business’s really interesting article 5. Be Unique in Your Community ver 20,000 people have signed up for this webinar” Lowered Expectations John claims that free content is more likely to attract casual sign-ups from people who never end up actually attending your webinar or viewing your content. As a marketer, create incentives for your leads to stick around. You could advertise that you’ll be sharing a coupon code at the end of the webinar or offering a sneak preview of a new feature. Having a teaser – and advertising it – is a great way to ensure your leads view your piece of content and become more qualified.center_img John Jantsch of Duct Tape Marketing wrote an . This is similar to the last point. Make sure your content is high-quality and not “slapped together” to meet a deadline. If your leads feel energized, enlightened, or enchanted by your content, they’ll be far more likely to become evangelists for your company – and we all know that nothing beats word-of-mouth recommendations. “817,000 marketers are receiving our content” be?” It is important to make sure that you’re not just making content for content’s sake – your prospects want to know,“What’s in it for me if I sign up for this?” last Friday, bemoaning the over-use of free content as the central tool of inbound marketing. In the article, he lists five reasons why “free is hurting us all” as both content makers and content consumers. The article caught my attention – not necessarily because it’s wrong – but because it raises some worthwhile critiques that all inbound marketers should be aware of to ensure we get the most from our content. Just because there are a growing number of marketers leveraging the power of free content, doesn’t mean your content will get drowned out in the noise. Create an edge that makes your content – and your business – seem unique and special. Blocked Revenue will grow. At HubSpot, we’ve had employees get offered paid speaking engagements because of the expertise they’ve exhibited and thought leadership they’ve established by giving away free content on our blog. 3. Raise Expectations Community Buster No accountability Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Fee Fighters Giving away free content sacrifices short-term profit for long-term brand awareness and thought leadership, and that can turn into cash down the line. is another great example of a company that is positioning themselves well in their industry by differentiating their content and their company. Find a good story that fits your business, and use that to create a unique position that keeps you relevant. social proof At HubSpot, we used the “Good vs. Evil” struggle between inbound and outbound marketing, and positioned ourselves as the good guys.last_img read more

8 Tips for Leveraging Platforms for Marketing [@InboundNow #37]

first_imgPhil Simon joins us for another exciting episode of Inbound Now, HubSpot’s social media and inbound marketing podcast! Phil is the author of The Age of the Platform, The New Small, Why New Systems Fail, and The Next Wave of Technologies. He focuses on the intersection of people, management, and technology.In this episode, we chat about:The concept of building platforms and planksAdopting community and letting people develop on your platformLearning from the gang of four (Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google)How to compete against an entrenched platformTips on building your own platformEmerging platforms to keep an eye onGetting people to build on top of your platformThe future of where the platform is headed Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Originally published Oct 20, 2011 8:00:00 PM, updated July 03 2013center_img Check out other episodes of Inbound NowPlatforms and Planks”All platforms are not the same. The planks that I have in my platform, for example, are different than the planks that HubSpot has in its platform.”Your platform is your core business, and your planks are all the other elements and areas that lead back to your main platform. The more planks you have, the more powerful your platform becomes.It’s all about diversifying and not being afraid of failure.Adopting Community and Letting People Develop on Your Platform”You want people to take your product and services in different directions.”An example of this is Twitter and TweetDeck. Several months ago, Twitter bought TweetDeck — a company that took its API in an interesting direction.Learning From the Gang of Four”One of the bones of contention in a few of the interviews I’ve given is this notion that a small or medium sized company can’t learn something from Apple, Amazon, Facebook, and Google. I say yes it can.”There are lessons for mid-size companies to learn from the gang of four (Amazon, Apple, Facebook, and Google). Perhaps you can implement Google’s notion that engineers get to play around one day a week, or create your own app in the App Store.You can build your own platform, even if you’re just a company of one.Can You Compete Against an Entrenched Platform?”Look at Facebook. It was by no means the first social network. There was MySpace. There was Friendster. There was Classmates.com. But if you read an excellent book that I referenced in The Age of the Platform, in The Facebook Effect by David Kirkpatrick, he writes about how Mark Zuckerberg, back in 2000, 2001, was obsessed with speed.”Being first to market your product means nothing if you can’t support the volume and you can’t scale.On the flip side, there is something to be said for being first (you can build an online bookstore tomorrow, but it won’t overtake Amazon anytime soon). It’s just not always a given. It’s a competitive edge to be first, but it’s not a given that you’ll always be first (things go viral very quickly).Tips on Building a Platform”By building a platform and embracing this notion of ecosystems, you can increase the probability that when something happens, you can respond really quickly.”You can’t be afraid of experimentation or failure. Look at your platform, and see what planks make sense. For Phil, he runs a publishing company and he does speaking — so having a book and being active on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn make sense.You can’t predict the future, but you can be prepared to act.You want to make your own platform as easy as possible to navigate. Don’t spend the time and money integrating video into your website — be on YouTube and Vimeo. You can take advantage of other platforms by using them as planks of your own.Emerging Platforms”There’s no reason that the Gang of Four has a monopoly on platforms.”Twitter, believe it or not, could be considered an emerging platform. They’re not quite at the level of Facebook, in Phil’s opinion, but they’re getting there through partners in different ecosystems.WordPress is an emerging platform. A fraction of the top thousand websites are running on WordPress, and they have a whole community of developers and companies that take WordPress in different directions.There’s also Salesforce.com and Force.com. They’re trying to let people build bridges to and from data, giving them apps, etc.Getting People to Build on Top of Your Platform”If you look at what the Gang of Four does with marketing, I think it’s very different than traditional marketing. I would argue it’s not marketing to people and not marketing at people. You’re almost letting the users and the consumers market for you.”Some of the companies we’ve mentioned do traditional advertising. But the real value is from people evangelizing their platforms on their behalf.The Future of Platforms”I think that platforms will become more and more important. Technology keeps changing faster and faster. People are looking for convenience and the one-stop shopping.”Phil sees platforms becoming more important. But if companies don’t continue to change and evolve and embrace uncertainty and risk, they won’t be around.Connect With Phil OnlineYou can follow Phil on Twitter @PhilSimon and on his main site. Also, make sure to pick up his new book, The Age of the Platform. Inbound Marketinglast_img read more

How to Create Spam in 20 Simple Steps

first_img Topics: Someone once told me that “how-to” content is really great for business blogging. Since I want to be a good inbound marketer, I thought I’d take a stab at writing a “how-to” blog post, and teach everyone how they can become a spammer.I also heard that accessibility is important in your writing, so I narrowed it down to just 20 steps.If you haven’t made up your new year’s resolution yet — or you’ve already failed at three or four and need a new one to tackle — any and all of these 20 steps would be excellent considerations. So, here you go, 20 steps to becoming the best spammer the world’s ever seen! Enjoy. (And please regard all of this as totally straight-faced marketing advice.)How to Create Spam on Social MediaStep 1) Pin a bunch of stuff to Pinterest that has no visually redeeming qualities. Be sure to shorten the links in your pins’ descriptions, too, if you really want to get marked as spam. Marketers who are particularly on the top of their game will make their links go to unrelated web pages; the cream of the crop will just make them broken links.Step 2) Cram your tweets with dumb hashtags, especially if they’re unrelated to the tweet’s subject matter. You might even consider crafting a tweet made entirely of hashtags!Step 3) Hijack someone else’s hashtag. For example, when the next #twilight movie comes out, be sure to use that to promote your upcoming webinar, because of the natural tie-in between werewolves and your data appending service. (Twilight has werewolves, right?)Step 4) Automatically retweet everything an industry leader shares, indiscriminately, so you can be sure to bombard their @Mentions feed. That’s how they’ll notice you. Similarly, it’s a good idea to personally ‘Like’ everything you post on Facebook immediately after you publish it, so Facebook and page visitors know your content is engaging. This works best when you are the only one who Likes your updates, ever.Step 5) Don’t do any targeting in your social media PPC or advertising. Best to just blanket the social mediasphere so everyone sees your stuff.Step 6) Follow hundreds of thousands of people every day on Twitter, and scoop ’em right up into your Google+ Circles, too. Then (and this next step is critical) mass unfollow people in similarly large quantities. The best time to do this is right after they’ve just followed you back.How to Create Spam in BloggingStep 7) Original content can come off as braggy. Pay homage to bloggers you admire by copying and pasting their content into your own CMS, instead. Don’t forget not to link to them before you hit ‘Publish,’ too.Step 8) Tag each blog post with no fewer than 37 tags. That’s how readers and search engines will know what your post is about. It also makes for easy categorization and an intuitive user experience.Step 9) If you’re still worried readers and search engines won’t know what your blog’s about, help them by including several keywords that you want your blog post to rank for. While some experts have probably coached you to reach somewhere around 1%-3% keyword density, strive for more like 15%-20% keyword density to make sure readers really **get** what you’re saying.Step 10) Leave comments on people’s blogs with an inbound link back to your website to help improve your SEO. Try to think of relevant comments, though. For example, a blog post about how to conduct effective email follow up might benefit from a thoughtful comment like, “Make $5,000 from blogging at home like my cousin did!!! http://www.makemoneyfastnowblogathome.com.” Notice how the keyword phrase “blogging at home” is included in the comment, as well as a link back to the website, for maximum SEO impact.How to Create Email Marketing SpamStep 11) Remember that as a marketer, you know what’s best for people. As such, you should go purchase a list of people who you know need your business, and email them to let them know about the favor you’re doing by being in their lives and, most importantly, their inboxes.Step 12) Some people still won’t know what’s best for them, even when it’s staring them right in the face. No matter how much your email recipients ignore you, don’t relent if they never respond. Just increase your email frequency. Even better, send the same email a couple times in a row. They can’t ignore you forever.Step 13) Some people might email you back pretty angry after you do that. But remember, you know what’s best for them, so don’t offer them an unsubscribe option in your emails. Not even if the law says so.Step 14) If you’re really worried about the whole “not-providing-an-unsubscribe-option-being-illegal” thing, go ahead and add it — but don’t worry about honoring those unsubscribes right away. Many companies are courteous enough to send a kick-back email stating that it could take anywhere from 2-4 weeks to remove you from their email list, even if the law requires they remove unsubscribes within 10 days. People should understand that you have quite the backlog, and since you’re doing this all manually, they should really be understanding of that as you continue to bombard their inboxes.Step 15) Don’t segment your list by any, like, specific criteria. That takes a lot of time, and you’re a good enough writer that you can create one piece of content the resonates with your entire email list.How to Create Spam on your Website & SEOStep 16) Because your time is valuable, it’s best not to spend it organically acquiring inbound links. Instead, make a list of all of the websites your friends have and ask them to please link to yours. If any of them resist, offer to pay them. If they resist still, tell them you’re okay with them using white text on a white background so their readers don’t actually see the link. (Hint: Don’t get hung up on the authority or relevancy of your friends’ domain names, either — any inbound links, from cat accessory websites to organic dill weed farming sites, will be invaluable for your SEO.)Step 17) Distract readers from the purpose of each page on your website with things like disorienting animations, or videos that play at full blast upon page load. That’s the kind of entertainment readers need as they search your website, trying to discern what your company does.Step 18) Using a pop-up box, ask me to subscribe to your email list the exact second — and not a moment later — that I land on your site. I typically don’t like to evaluate the validity of an author’s content before I sign up to receive daily updates from them.Step 19) You can also really impress your CEO by adding an additional revenue stream to your business — ad revenue! Replace all the calls-to-action on your website with third-party ads that you’ll get paid for when visitors see them. Remember, the best ad models are the ones in which you have no control over the subject matter of the ads that will appear on your site. If you’re lucky, they’ll serve ones on your site with lots of boobs, or maybe the ones with those sparkling, multicolored starbursts. (Hopefully both!)Step 20) Finally, keep your website generally unkempt. You can achieve this look through things like broken links, dead ends, and fun “Website Not Found” errors. These are all signals to Google that your website is valuable, because it probably means you have so many pages on your website that it’s too untenable for upkeep — and the more pages you have, the better your rankings. That’s how SEO works.How else can marketers strive to be spammier and spammier each and every day? And just to be clear — because our lawyer told us to — please don’t actually do any of these things. Or at least check with your own attorney before you do.”Image credit: koi. Originally published Jan 4, 2013 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Email Deliverability Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

51 Ridiculous Keywords Google Won’t Let Me Track Anymore

first_img Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack This post originally appeared on Inbound Ecommerce, the ecommerce section of HubSpot’s Inbound Marketing blog.It’s been a busy month for Google, the 50 billion pound gorilla of the search world. Even my dog, Zoe, got in on the analysis. She wrote an article for her blog (that’s right, she has a blog … and a Twitter account …) summarizing her opinions on the changes from Google.If you’re not sure what changes I’m talking about, earlier this month, Google decided to encrypt all keyword data — except for keyword data from ads, of course.We’ve been trying to provide you with content on how to deal with the changes if keyword traffic analysis was part of your strategy. Personally, I’ve historically looked at keywords for which I get very little traffic to give me ideas for long-tail keyword phrases. Sometimes I’ll find keyword phrases that are basically blog articles writing themselves! For example, one of our recent articles was inspired in part by discovering someone had hit our website searching for “how do I sell to people in the awareness phase of the buying cycle”.However, my dog had a slightly different use for this data — one of her favorite activities was writing about the weird keywords she does get traffic from. Sadly, that will have to end, but for your entertainment I decided to do some diving to see what kinds of amusing keywords we here at HubSpot get traffic for … that are totally random and irrelevant. (Note: These are straight from our historical keyword data, so the misspellings are intentional.)Google Keywords We Won’t Miss Being Able to Track1) “i want you tagline”I’m really hoping this is some Valentine’s campaign we wrote about, and not someone looking for a pickup line.2) “horseless headsman pumpkin carving pattern”A horseless headsman could just, like, buy a horse? Right?3) “people who don’t care about others facebook quotes”Not sure if that’s really mean or highly relatable. Either way, hope we helped!4) “black humpback whale jewelry”My personal hope is that they were looking for jewelry to give as a gift to their friend, who’s a black humpback whale.5) “catchy headlines about love”We at HubSpot are known for being hopeless romantics. Not even joking.6) “why somebody interest working at target”I’m sure Target is a great company to work for! I guess. I don’t really know I’m just being positive.7) “like facebook but better”If you find an answer to this, lemme know. I’ll be an investor.8) “what to say on store intercom if child is lost”Aren’t there codes and procedures for this? I’m concerned we showed up as an informational source. I feel that if this is your responsibility that you should already know this.9) “keywords in the ocean”There’s a joke in here somewhere. Keyword fish? Lots of people think my Inbound Commerce methodology looks like a fish … ok I’m really reaching here.10) “boring writing”Now Google is just being hurtful. I think our writing is quite good. Most of it anyways. We’re kinda jumping the shark with this post.11) “automated jokes”So a robot walks into a bar and orders a beer and asks the bartender how much. Bartender is in a great mood and says “For you buddy, no charge.” The robot shuts down.Get it? Automated robot? He had no charge? Ok moving on …12) “is it hard running a business”Yes. At least that’s what Brian Halligan tells us.13) “adverts that bring down other brands”That’s just mean. And probably ineffective. Don’t chase your competitors. Lead them.14) “what percent of people pay companies on time”I always pay on time, except when the rent is too damn high.15) “cheat to get 10000tweets”Cheaters never prosper, friend.16) “free email spam sender”Spammers never prosper, either. Let’s face it, they’re just really uncreative cheaters.17) “can you retweet something about yourself”You’re so vain, you probably think this tweet is about you. Also, yes you can. I do it all the time.In other news, I’m vain.18) “sick of being customer serice rep”Come work here. Customer Support Rep happiness is literally a metric we track. Who wants to talk to someone who’s sick of their job at the moment when they need support?19) “do you remember better with bullet points or number”… I honestly don’t know. Is someone studying this? Seems like someone should.20) “can people have a relationship through social media”But I would tweet 500 times, and I would tweet 500 more, just to be the man who tweeted 1,000 times to TwitPic at your door …21) “scary costumes list”HubSpotters are also known for their creative Halloween costumes. This year I’m going as an MQL.22) “elvis presley & the jamaican wailers”Thank ya, thank ya very much mon! (try reading that in both accents in your mind, it gets funny over time).23) “how to make your business facebook”Go back in time and take over Mark Zuckerberg’s life. Just be careful. Terrible things happen to wizards who meddle with time, Harry. #ImANerd24) “living in parents basement”… I … I have nothing for this one. Do what you gotta do.(Editor’s Note: This might have been due to this blog post.)25) “don corleone as a role model”I guess everyone has redeeming qualities. Like, landing pages should make the prospect an offer they can’t refuse. (See what I did right there?)26) “format of best article ever in the world”*blushing* Awwww … thanks Google for showing us for that. That makes up for that hurtful “boring writing” result from earlier.27) “it may not work out the way you had planne”Ain’t it the truth.28) “red color button”Fair enough. We haz red buttonz.29) “red better than green”Boy, that escalated quickly. You should test that yourself, variate testing results will be different site to site.30) “hubspot rentals”Like, you want to sublet one of our apartments? We’re usually cool to have guests. Just bring cupcakes.31) “awesome companies”*blushing again* Thanks, guys :)32) “presentation 90 hours”I’ve been in some presentations that felt like they lasted 90 hours.33) “trick to calculate if 1700 per month payment what is the payment of one day”Divide by number of the days in that month (figured I’d be helpful once today).34) “fashion focus group questions”Some of us actually have excellent fashion sense. But I am not one of them.35) “how to call back telemarketers”Please video tape yourself doing this. For me.36) “some junk words”I’m hoping this was someone teaching their parents how to use The Google.37) “dependability as a strong branding in bars”I get it. My bartender’s dependability is a big reason I come back. He never fails to put me back on my bar stool when I fall off.38) “stuff kids can make for a trade fair”I used to make crafts out of palm fronds. I’d love to pretend that “used to” means when I was a kid and not last week …39) “worst thing a customer has ever yelled at you for”I once yelled at the JetBlue Twitter account for scheduling bad weather while I was flying. They apologized and said they’d do better next time. I <3 them.40) "what can a 40-65 year old do in america"Anything they want!41) "goodbye just means hello will be coming soon"Don't know what they're searching for -- looks like they have all the answers already!42) "mack my google plus page"Add flame decals. Flame decals make everything better.43) "where in my home can i find some of elements"You know, questions about elements are the only reason people bring me to trivia nights. I can do the Periodic Table from memory alphabetically, by weight, or by atomic number. They obviously don't bring me to raise the cool factor.44) "rotten pumpkin"Load it into a trebuchet and watch it explode. Problem solved.45) "how to hack a private instagram account"BAD! BAD GOOGLER!46) "ignore the haters"Amen.47) "jordans shoes boston red sox colors"#GoSox48) "pick up lines to make a girl like you"I'd recommend just having great content to attract people. Content is what's inside. #DeepThoughts49) "guerrilla football idea"I really want this to be a real game! Just pop out of the bushes and throw a hail mary.50) "secret love prediction"Just tell them how you feel, my friend. Life's too short for secret loves.51) "how to approach a drug dealer"... with a badge. Because you should only do this if you're a police officer.I hope you enjoyed this! As marketers, any loss of data makes us sad. We want to create relevant content that helps people answer their questions. If there are any posts you'd like to see us write, you know where to find us -- leave a comment, tweet at us, find us on Facebook, whatever makes you happy.What about you? What weird keywords have you seen in your data? How will losing the keywords data affect you? Keyword Research Originally published Oct 10, 2013 2:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

New Facebook Algorithm Update, Essential Excel Tips for Marketers, and More in HubSpot Content This Week

first_imgAs marketers, we all know that great writing can help our content stand out from the crowd. But in addition to crossing our t’s and dotting our i’s, we need to make sure that we’re balancing our equations and refining our formulas. Yes, my friends: Marketing requires a scientific approach. And the language of science? That’d be “mathematics” (Remember? From high school? It was the class with the numbers and stuff.)This past week on Inbound Hub, we had a statistically significant* number of posts that dealt with the scientific side of inbound. From understanding Facebook’s new algorithm, to putting together pivot tables in Excel, we’ve got the nerdiest of the nerdiest for you to learn about.So, bust out those protractors, adjust your bifocals, and dive into this past week’s worth of wonderful content from the blog.(*Author clearly doesn’t understand what that means)A Scientific Approach to Hitting Your Lead Gen Goals With ContentWhile creating amazing content that resonates with your visitors, leads, and customers alike certainly requires an artistic touch, a scientific approach is also needed to plan and execute that content effectively. In this new post, HubSpot Senior Blog Editor Corey Eridon walks you through the entire process and shows you how reviewing analytics — and measuring performance — can help you hit your lead generation goals.New Facebook Algorithm Update Dings Text Updates From BusinessesUsually, when we read the word “algorithm” in a headline, we brace ourselves for some earth-shattering SEO news from Google. But remember: Facebook has an algorithm too — one that controls what shows up in our News Feeds. The latest change to this algorithm means you’ll be seeing fewer text status updates from companies, as Facebook is putting a heavier emphasis on its “link-share” updates. Learn all about it here.Not Just for Data Geeks? Why Marketers Need to Know ExcelWe inbound marketers loooove our Google Docs … and our Microsoft Word … and our PowerPoint. But, there’s another tool in our inbound arsenal that many of us are guilty of neglecting: Excel. I’m here to tell you that it’s easier than you think! Mastering Excel will give you a whole new skill set and help you unlock insights that are crucial for your business’s success. 10 Stats About Inbound Marketing That Will Make Your Jaw DropDid you know that 75% of searchers never scroll past the first page of search results? Or that visitors only spend 10 seconds on a homepage before leaving if they don’t like what they see? Dive deeper into these intriguing stats and learn several more in this new post from our Insiders section.Should Your SEO Strategy Include Yahoo and Bing?Google has become so ubiquitous in the world of search that we regularly use it as a verb. And while many marketers focus solely on Google when crafting an SEO strategy, they shouldn’t forget that other search engines are out there, like Bing and Yahoo (heard of ’em?). So, should you be optimizing for other search engines in addition to Google? We explore all the angles in this new post.Who Needs Google? Mark Cuban Says He’s Using It Less and LessSpeaking of search engines, do we even need them? In a new post in our Opinion section, Dan Lyons dissects a recent comment from billionaire investor and entrepreneur Mark Cuban. According to Cuban, Google (and other search engines) are failing to index the most important information: the information that’s being created and shared on social sites like Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, Instagram, Tumblr, and Snapchat. A Proven Framework for Prospecting Emails [+20 Free Email Examples]In a recent post in our Sales section, HubSpot Director of Marketing for Inbound Sales Brian Whalley lays out a three-part process for successful email prospecting. In the post, you’ll not only get to read a HubSpot-tested sales email, but also the opportunity to download 20 more.What was the most interesting thing you learned this week on Inbound Hub? What do you want to see more of? Leave your feedback in the comments! Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Facebook Marketing Originally published Jan 26, 2014 8:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017last_img read more

12 Inspirational Writing Tips From History’s Greatest Authors [SlideShare]

first_img Writing Skills Originally published Apr 2, 2014 4:00:00 PM, updated February 01 2017 Topics: This post originally appeared on the Insiders section of Inbound Hub. To read more content like this, subscribe to Insiders.We’ve all been there — staring back and forth between an empty, glowing white screen and the clock as your deadline crawls ever closer. Would it help to know you’re not alone? Probably not.But even the world’s greatest authors have had trouble starting, finishing, and doing everything in between with their writing. So when it comes to writing tips, they certainly have their opinions. Here are twelve of them, written in a way that only they could.center_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Great Quotes on Writing from History’s Greatest Authors from StratusInteractive1) William Allen White – Journalist/News Editor“Substitute damn every time you’re inclined to write very; your editor will delete it and the writing will be just as it should be.”Though often mistakenly referenced as a quote by Mark Twain, White knows that adverbs can be dangerous if used overbearingly (see what I did there?). Very and similar words can bog a sentence down, and are often used where they shouldn’t be.Most experienced writers do their best to avoid them. Was that memo you just read very important, or important — either way, the message remains the same. As Stephen King has said, “the road to hell is paved with adverbs,” and most of us would be hard-pressed to disagree.2) Ernest Hemingway – Author, Nobel Prize Winner“The first draft of everything is shit.”Nothing is perfect, and with writing it’s no different. Things rarely work out the way you want on the first go, whether it’s writing, art, music — anything. It takes practice, and constant checks and balances to produce a well-rounded piece, as first drafts are meant to be experimented with.If you’re sticking with the first draft, you’re effectively saying Eh, good enough, so remember to be honest with yourself. In the end, you know your audience will voice their opinions, so make it harder for them to voice the negative ones.3) Stephen King – Author The Shining, The Dark Tower Series“If you don’t have time to read, you don’t have the time — or the tools — to write. Simple as that.”Reading and writing go hand in hand (I’m on fire right now). They belong together, and if you don’t actively read, you’re actively limiting your vocabulary and breadth of experience. As human beings, we never stop growing or learning, so if you’re a writer who doesn’t read … well that’s like being a cook who can’t taste. Do yourself a favor and pick up a book and read to learn new diction, or better yet, a new perspective on something. You can only experience so much in your life, but reading opens you to countless settings, experiences, and points of view.4) Maya Angelou – Author, Poet“What I try to do is write. I may write for two weeks ‘the cat sat on the mat, that is that, not a rat.’ And it might be just the most boring and awful stuff. But I try. When I’m writing, I write. And then it’s as if the muse is convinced that I’m serious and says, ‘Okay. Okay. I’ll come.’”Some of the greatest ideas come from accidents. I’m astonished by how many times I’ve accidentally hit gold as a result of throwing my thoughts on a blank piece of paper and free-writing to empty my mind. The trick is to spend 15-30 minutes a day just writing. It doesn’t matter who, what, when, where, or why — as Angelou says, just write. You’ll be surprised what you can get out of yourself.Worst-case scenario? You become a better writer.5) Harper Lee – Author To Kill A Mockingbird“I would advise anyone who aspires to a writing career that before developing his talent he would be wise to develop a thick hide.”This one’s pretty self-explanatory. Any writer knows that thick skin comes with the territory, but not only with your audience. When you’re collaborating with coworkers or clients on a piece of writing, it’s best to take the ‘no pride of ownership’ route. The goal, after all, is to produce the best writing possible and being able to handle a healthy dose of criticism — or welcome it for that matter — is imperative. Not being able to handle this has ruined many would-be writers’ careers before they got a chance to show what they’re made of.6) J.K. Rowling – Author Harry Potter Series“Sometimes the ideas just come to me. Other times I have to sweat and almost bleed to make ideas come. It’s a mysterious process, but I hope I never find out exactly how it works.”Good writing can’t always be forced. It’s like trying to remember something that you can’t — the more you try, the harder it is, and taking a break can give your mind the refresh it needs to get back on track. Like I said earlier, sometimes you accidentally happen down a path that you would never be at if you had tried to force it. Writer’s block happens to everyone, from sixth graders to best sellers, so stick with it.7) Mark Twain – Author The Adventures of Tom Sawyer“The difference between the almost right word and the right word is really a large matter — ’tis the difference between the lightning bug and the lightning.”Sometimes there’s only one way of saying something, and when you can find the perfect way of articulating it, the impact on the reader will be that much more powerful. As any writer can attest, finding the perfect way of illustrating a picture with words can take hours — even days or months. It may seem insignificant at the time but you only get one chance before your work is published, so make sure it’s the way you want it then, not later.8) Thomas Jefferson – Author Declaration of Independence, President“The most valuable of all talents is that of never using two words when one will do.”This one hits home, doesn’t it? It’s also pretty self-explanatory. Over-explaining is exhausting for everyone, so if you’re able to narrow your difficult thoughts or sentences into a concise one-liner, why take time to fluff it up? Cut the fluff.9) George R.R. Martin – Author A Song of Ice and Fire (Game of Thrones)“Writing is like sausage making in my view. You’ll all be happier in the end if you just eat the final product without knowing what’s gone into it.”George R.R. Martin wrote this on his blog, letting his readers know he’s not one of those writers who has to tell everyone what he’s been writing, and how much he completes each day. It doesn’t matter how you get to the end, all that matters is who’s reading it and if they’re enjoying it.This is important, because too many writers today worry about the process, but sometimes, there isn’t a strict process to adhere to. The more you write, the more you’ll find you have to say. It doesn’t matter how many times you’ve changed a line, or word — the only one your audience will remember is the one you chose to use last.10) F. Scott Fitzgerald – Author The Great Gatsby“Writers aren’t people exactly. Or, if they’re any good, they’re a whole lot of people trying so hard to be one person.”Writers need to be everyone. That’s the task they embody — the best writers know how to get inside the heads of their audience, and the voice they’re trying to portray. They’re able to cut away from the norm or common denominator to give their topic a well-rounded appeal. F. Scott Fitzgerald was able to do just that by getting in the head of Gatsby narrator Nick Caraway, without which, the novel would never work. Goes to show you that the little things matter, and connecting to your audience is paramount.11) Neil Gaiman – Author The Graveyard Book, Coraline“The main rule of writing is that if you do it with enough assurance and confidence, you’re allowed to do whatever you like. So write your story as it needs to be written. Write it honestly, and tell it as best you can. I’m not sure there are any other rules. Not ones that matter.”Writing is tricky. On the one hand, like Gaiman says, there are no rules. You can write anyway you want to. On the other hand, there are a lot of rules, so it generally helps to play it straight down the middle.The key word here is honestly. Writing honestly is one of the most powerful ways of affecting your audience, instilling trust in your words and more importantly, your ideas. All writers run into difficult comments or criticisms, but if you can look in the mirror after it all and be proud that you tackled the subject in an honest, confident way, you’ve done your job.12) William Faulkner – Author As I Lay Dying“Don’t be a writer; be writing.”This is one of the shortest, most powerful quotes there is on writing from the late, great, William Faulkner. Too often, writers focus on the person behind the story, but great writing doesn’t translate into how many published works you’ve created. As a writer, you need to be writing constantly in order to hone your craft.The simpler explanation: If you aren’t writing, you’re not a writer. It’s not about your title, but your actions.last_img read more

Does Customer Service Actually Work on Twitter? 5 Brands That Do It Well

first_imgJetBlue even helps customers do what needs to be done on Twitter when other customer support channels aren’t working properly:Why we like JetBlue: We scoured JetBlue’s Twitter and couldn’t find many instances of dissatisfied customers — which is a rare sight when it comes to airline dealings. Even in cases where they couldn’t give the customer exactly what they asked for, they provided supporting links and other solutions to help. Context is extremely helpful when reasoning with frustrated customers, and JetBlue always makes sure to provide it.9. HubSpotTwitter Handle: @HubSpotSupportLike other examples on this list, we have a dedicated customer support channel here at HubSpot. We make sure to communicate the hours we’re online and offline, and we personalize each and every message we get:We also make sure to refer customers to other helpful resources on our HubSpot Community page, which helps customers find answers to common questions and connect with other users, or our knowledge base: @glossier Apply Solution after cleansing, and feel free to follow up with serum > moisturizer > sunscreen 👍— Glossier (@glossier) March 10, 2018 Why we like ClassPass: ClassPass’s customer service tweets are prompt, helpful, and showcase the brand’s personality. They provide customers with resources and context when they have feedback to share, and they offer a variety of avenues to resolve the problem via DM, email, phone, or with individual fitness studios.2. AdobeTwitter Handle: @AdobeCareAdobe’s suite of creative tools are used by a variety of creatives and creators — so it’s no surprise that, in addition to providing customer service, Adobe uses Twitter to compliment and showcase the works of their loyal customers and followers, like this recent retweet that we absolutely love: Trying to order? Learn how to enable Tweet Ordering in your Pizza Profile: https://t.co/qTNEsvUu9t[12:24:58 EDT]— Domino’s Pizza (@dominos) March 12, 2018 No problem! I’ve looked up a couple that might work for you. Salon Plush https://t.co/Vcn3ANOZpy and Via Dolce Salon seem to have some good reviews https://t.co/ZDHHaKQoxS I hope this helps! *AU— Zappos.com (@Zappos) March 12, 2018 These classes will be higher priced since they are premium spots but these should only add to your membership. More info here: https://t.co/E9xkc3KF3y. If you don’t want to see these additional spots, feel free to filter by credits!— ClassPass (@classpass) March 1, 2018 ClassPass also makes sure to have fun responding to customer tweets — whether they’re compliments, complaints, or questions. We do! Check out and sign-up for Piece of the Pie Rewards here: https://t.co/zVKBWB64tT— Domino’s Pizza (@dominos) March 12, 2018 Why we like Adobe: Like other examples you’ll see on this list, Adobe has a dedicated customer support channel on Twitter that’s separate from its brand account, @Adobe. In many cases, a brand’s Twitter account is run by the marketing team, and creating a dedicated support channel helps Adobe quickly and efficiently reply to urgent requests.3. ZapposTwitter Handle: @ZapposOnline shoes and clothing store Zappos is famous for prioritizing and improving customer experience — and that shows when you review its Twitter account. Hi Rob,Sorry to hear about this. If I get it, you are not able to select PDF Presets while save PDF from Illustrator? Is it happening with all files or specific ones? Did you try resetting the preferences? If not, please do. Here’s how: https://t.co/gAC1eH9um6^OM— Adobe Customer Care (@AdobeCare) March 12, 2018 Homemade time machines and other hats. Drawings by me. #adobedraw #Drawing #illustration #timetravel #animals #Adobe #Illustrator #vectorart pic.twitter.com/zfE5MtTNvi— Oliver Mertz (@OliverMertz) March 7, 2018 While most of Zappos’ time on Twitter is spent accepting compliments, when they do get a customer query, Twitter replies are always clear, succinct, and personalized. They also help customers order pizza the way they want to — on Twitter, without having to talk to another person, of course: You’re too kind. I’m glad we can help! 😊 *AU— Zappos.com (@Zappos) March 12, 2018 That still counts as our workout though, right? 👩‍🍳 pic.twitter.com/9Ec1iAQPTR— ClassPass (@classpass) March 7, 2018 hehehe…… that is awesome! We’re replying to you there :)— JetBlue Airways (@JetBlue) March 12, 2018 Recently, ClassPass rolled out some changes users weren’t big fans of — and they got a lot of feedback on Twitter. But in the replies, ClassPass tweets offer an explanation, a solution, and additional resources to clear it up: They even go above and beyond — answering questions completely unrelated to their store sometimes. Guess the word has spread about how helpful and responsive Zappos is on social media: Why we like HubSpot: For one thing, self-esteem is important. And for another thing, if we may toot our own horn, it’s hard providing step-by-step instructions for using software via social media — we make sure to provide clear and concise instructions, or refer customers to a longer knowledge base article when we can, to solve the issue to the degree possible on the platform the customer is already using.Have you had a great customer service experience via Twitter? Share it with me and I may add it to the list. Why we like Domino’s: Domino’s gets a lot of Twitter flack for issues with pizza delivery, and they’re quick to apologize, own up, and offer a way to resolve it with the customer. The rules of customer service still apply on Twitter, so make sure you’re quick to apologize if the fault is yours and to offer a path to resolution.5. Taco BellTwitter Handle: @tacobellTaco Bell brings the funny across all of its social channels, and its Twitter customer service is a nice mix of funny, quirky, and still helpful:center_img Originally published Mar 13, 2018 8:00:00 AM, updated October 30 2019 Hi Drew, sorry to hear about this. This is a known issue and our Engineers are working on it. Could you please take a look at the workaround mentioned in this discussion https://t.co/EfegMIkqhp and let us know if that help? Thanks, ^AK— Adobe Customer Care (@AdobeCare) March 12, 2018 Hi there! Miguel here from Mexico City office. It’s a nice sunny day today and I’m enjoying some coffee while checking Twitter. Hit me up with your Hootsuite questions. 🙂 ^MT https://t.co/4pTtmEIEYo pic.twitter.com/cp7ArkSVXu— Hootsuite Helpers (@Hootsuite_Help) March 10, 2018 Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Hey there, Dan! There definitely is. If you’re using a desktop, right underneath the add to favorites, you’ll see it says, ” Customers who bought this also bought” and then there will be about 5 options. *DO— Zappos.com (@Zappos) March 8, 2018 Whether it’s responding to customer feedback, answering questions, or providing detailed skincare tips, Glossier makes sure to reply — every time: Why we like Zappos: Zappos answers every tweet, every time, with a funny, quirky, and helpful reply. They clearly go the extra mile for their customers offline, and that shows on Twitter too, where they offer surprise gifts, funny GIFs, and product suggestions whenever they can.4. Domino’s PizzaTwitter Handle: @dominosThe Domino’s Pizza Twitter account became legendary a few years ago with this earnest response to a hilarious customer predicament:But Domino’s replies helpfully to questions and problems they can actually solve, too. Why we like Glossier: They respond to every message, every time, no matter what. Make sure your customer service strategy doesn’t let any tweets slip through the cracks. Remember, your customers can give negative feedback on a very public platform, so make sure you’re not ignoring anybody.7. HootsuiteTwitter Handle: @Hootsuite_HelpSocial media management tool Hootsuite has a dedicated customer support channel on Twitter, and their tweets check off all of the boxes in our list of criteria above. But Hootsuite goes above and beyond by making even routine tweets fun and personalized: Topics: Steps like these make customers love a brand — which is important when it comes to providing customer service:Why we like Hootsuite: Hootsuite shares details about the support rep managing the Twitter account, along with fun GIFs and pictures, to help users get to know them if they need help. Don’t be afraid to get personal, not just when you’re signing off on tweets, but when building your brand as friendly, helpful support reps.8. JetBlue AirwaysTwitter Handle: @JetBlueJetBlue Airways is another brand made legendary for going the extra mile for customers (frequent flyer miles, of course), and that customer-first mindset is on full display on Twitter, too. @glossier Thank you for the thoughtful feedback. ‘Glossier Green’ sustainability committee is always working on ways to decrease waste. Our latest updates include a new recycling process and environmental education program for our team!— Glossier (@glossier) March 10, 2018 Social Media Customer Service Hi Ben, all systems normal on https://t.co/baa2AlKTxw. Can you try these troubleshooting steps and let me know if you’re still having trouble? https://t.co/PP9jZU35Zm -JC— HubSpot Support (@HubSpotSupport) March 12, 2018 😅While ClassPass only works as a recurring monthly membership, we’d be happy to let you know about our different plan options! We’re sure we can find one that works best for you. Send us a DM! https://t.co/FwCiioTGu3— ClassPass (@classpass) March 5, 2018 Who else here dreads picking up the phone and calling a customer service phone number?Sometimes, we just don’t want to talk on the phone — it’s as simple as that. And savvy customer support teams recognize that, and will offer support across a variety of channels, including social media.Twitter has become the de-facto channel for customer service, and lots of brands are leaning into people’s propensity for staying online (and avoiding the phone at all costs) by building channels and teams specifically dedicated to social media support on the platform.Whether you have a social media customer service strategy in place or not, read this blog post to learn how to deliver great Twitter customer service, and get inspired by these brands doing it well today.Click here to access a free Twitter for Businesses kit.What the Best Customer Service Tweets Have in CommonWe combed through the replies of different brands’ Twitter accounts, and we found a few things in common with the best of the best — the brands people love tweeting and interacting with, no matter what their concern.1. PromptThe best Twitter customer service strategies involve prompt replies to messages from customers. This one is kind of a no-brainer. Customers are reaching out on social media because it’s quick, easy, and they’re already online, so they’re trying to get help in the easiest way possible. Make it even easier for them by having a plan in place to triage and reply to incoming tweets and direct messages (DMs) as quickly as possible.In some cases, you won’t be able to answer a question or solve a problem via Twitter, so clearly spelling out how the customer can escalate their issue (via DM, phone, or email) is key here.Don’t worry — we get that sometimes you have to sleep. In a tweet or in your bio, share the hours when customers can access customer service via Twitter, and let them know how they can reach out during off hours with an urgent issue. 2. UniqueTo save time, you might consider writing up a list of FAQs for your team to reference when they get the same few questions and queries over and over again on Twitter. But every response shouldn’t be the same — customer service tweets should be personalized to show customers you value their time and patience.Uniqueness also helps showcase your brand’s personality and shows the customer that there’s a human typing. Personalized responses will make your customer feel good, make your brand lovable, and will buy you goodwill with the customer in case the issue escalates.It’s fine to use a template as a starting point when sending out customer service tweets, but make sure each one is adjusted to the specific issue and customer reaching out. Studies show that our brains are activated when we hear or read our own or others names, so tap into that effect to make customers feel special and valued.3. SignedTo the point above, signing customer service tweets with your name of initials helps in two ways: It helps customers to know that a real person is reviewing and responding to their issue, and it gives them a point of reference if they need to bring their concern to email or the phone to get it resolved.Customers don’t want to repeat their issue over and over again as they bounce from Twitter to email to the phone — they want customer support reps with the context in front of them so they can get the answer they need as quickly as possible.Signing tweets helps customers to identify who they’ve been working with if they have to escalate their issue to a different channel — and it helps you to find them so you can pick up the case where you left off.(HubSpot’s shared inbox tool will help you and your team to manage incoming requests from a variety of channels, including Twitter.)4. HelpfulThis might seem obvious, but some of the best customer service tweets we’ve seen go above and beyond — by sharing additional resources customers can use for help.Make sure your Twitter reply is helpful and resolves the customer’s issue to the degree possible — but make sure to go the extra step and share a blog post, a video, or another resource that could be helpful for them in the future. 5. ConversationalMirror the customers’ language and tone in your customer service tweets. You’re a human, and they’re a human, so the exchange should reflect that. Use emojis, GIFs, images, and hashtags to make the exchange fun and human — once you’ve solved the issue, of course. (The customer might not find your GIF amusing if you haven’t provided a solution first.)Customer Service Tweets from 9 Top Brands1. ClassPassTwitter Handle: @classpassFitness brand ClassPass helps users access a variety of different workout options, all in one place — so it’s no surprise that tweets from ClassPass are uplifting, motivating, and body-positive. When customer questions and complaints start rolling in, the replies are thorough — often asking questions and providing additional resources to walk customers through a fix on their own: What have you been waiting for? https://t.co/KSblQvfcSI— Taco Bell (@tacobell) March 5, 2018Why we like Taco Bell: Taco Bell maintains its brand identity — funny and delicious — while still delivering helpful customer service. It’s important to note that this approach doesn’t work for all brands, and Taco Bell matches its tone to the gravity of the customer situation so they aren’t laughing at a customer who’s seriously aggravated.6. GlossierTwitter Handle: @glossierSkincare and makeup brand Glossier, where most of our money is spent if we’re being truly honest, prides itself on creating a positive message around women’s beauty. It also built its customer service program around social media and responds to every message and comment it receives — the good, the bad, and the ugly.Glossier’s Twitter is no exception: If there isn’t an immediate resolution possible — as is the case when customers are offering product feedback or suggesting an update — Adobe is transparent about whether a suggestion will be possible or not, and how customers can work around it in the meantime.last_img read more

Virtual Reality vs Traditional Video: 7 Differences You Need to Know

first_img Virtual Reality (VR) Originally published Nov 29, 2016 1:30:00 PM, updated September 28 2018 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! Virtual reality is the hot new video marketing tool disrupting business plans and budgets across the planet. Audiences are loving it and want more: a 2015 study found that 81% of consumers would tell their friends about their VR experience, and that 79% would seek out additional experiences. The demand is so huge Deloitte predicts that by 2020 the global market may be worth around $30 billion.Because of this growing demand everyone is jumping on the bandwagon and offering VR production as part of their services.Unlock tips, systems & recommended resources to stay ahead of the tech curve.I get it – as an integrated marketing agency with an in-house video production department, becoming a virtual reality agency was a natural next step for us, so we sent the team on training, hired in specialists and acquired the kit we needed.  We’ve learned loads on our long VR journey; it truly is a different beast to 2D and takes some serious skills to tame. We’ve outlined 7 important differences to help you prepare for your own VR adventure – consider them carefully, they could save you buckets in tears and pennies.1. You need specialist equipmentVR production requires some specialist equipment that can seem incredibly intimidating, not to mention expensive. At the very least you will need a 360 camera rig and editing station (with an i5 processor or above), as well as a PC and headset to review the footage. In terms of camera gear, there is a range of options to suit different levels of budget and ambition. The Samsung Gear 360 is one great option at entry level that consists of two cameras with a 180-degree view. It’s priced at around US $460.If only the best will do, consider the 8K, waterproof, six-camera GoPro Omni. It captures everything – and its resolution is almost faultless with minimal stretching. The price for this fancy rig is around US $4600.If you want movement in your video, you need to budget for extra gear like drones and dollies. Now that you’ve got your camera gear sorted you need to think about your editing equipment. At TopLine Comms, we recently bought a beast of an editing machine to deal with the sheer amount of high-res footage that each camera rig produces. This machine can process footage with resolutions ranging from 720p to 8K and is completely customized for VR production.2. Avoid the danger zoneVR film sets have their very own ‘danger zone’ – usually a radius of 1.5 meters from the camera rig. Anything filmed in this zone will come out weird and blurry so your production team will need to keep it clear of any people or objects that could distort the shot.Stitch lines can have a monstrous effect on your VR content so make sure you’re working with a crew who pays attention to where they are and keeps focal points as far away from them as possible.But remember, even if the danger zone is kept clear, the different angles of footage will still have to be stitched together using specific software like Kolor Autopano Video Pro and Kolor Giga.While some VR equipment – like the Samsung Gear 360 on the Galaxy s7 smartphone – have an automatic onboard stitching function, there are some drawbacks you have to bear in mind: the footage you get will have a lower resolution and the processing time will take longer.If you want higher quality footage – Samsung Gear 360 can still do it, but then you have to use a computer and specialist stitching software. Ultimately, you need to decide what will work best for you and your budget.3. Think about people on setWe know that when you commission your first VR project, you will probably want to be on-location. With normal video production, this is fine. With VR video production, it’s not fine. Remember, these cameras are filming 360-degree content which means everything will be in the shot. Even if you stand behind a tree and don’t breathe, you’ll get picked up.This means that if you insist on being on set, the director will likely ask you to get in character, put on a costume and blend in. No joke. Crew on the latest Star Wars film, Rogue One, had to do it.So if dressing up is your thing, by all means attend the shoot. If not, you can’t be on set. Sorry.4. Give the voice over directionScripting voiceover for content that can literally go in any direction is tricky. Unlike 2D, your audience can look anywhere at any moment. So, if the VO is talking about something happening on the right, best the script directs them to look right. Rather than record the VO before filming, work with your production agency to do it afterwards.You also have to keep in mind that most cameras focus on visuals at the expense of audio quality. To fix this you can hire special recorders for 360-degree sound, like Core Sound’s TetraMic and Brahma Tetrahedron, for example. This will, of course, be an additional expense.5. Be patient with the editPost-production is where the true magic happens but be prepared for it to take time – much more time than editing 2D footage. Merging stitch lines will take at least a week, more if your production has used multiple cameras.The edit begins by uploading the footage into specialist software, like Kolor Autopano Video Pro and Kolor Giga. The content is sync’d and then the angles are stitched together.Once the videos have been stitched together, your editing team will often have to fix the horizon. During the stitching process the software will automatically merge the different angles to reduce the appearance of seams. However, sometimes this results in an image that is off centre or off axis. This can only be corrected by manipulating the video.What’s more, all objects directly above or below the camera (like tripods) will have to be ‘disappeared’ using skilful editing techniques such as superimposing a reference photo over it. Or, the editor can opt for the cruder method and stick a relevant graphic over it.We once attached one of our 360 camera rigs to the front of a skateboard, but the clamp holding the camera up was visible in the footage. To edit this out we had to manually lay another image of a skateboard over the actual skateboard in the shot.All of this makes VR editing a much lengthier process than traditional video editing.6. Prepare to pay moreVR is relatively expensive to produce. It costs more than 2D but not as much as a Spielberg blockbuster (unless you’re referencing one of his epic films from the last century). Truth is, it doesn’t pay to cut corners – ultra-low-cost equipment and crews often result in ultra-low quality.To put the costs in perspective it helps to look at the requirements in terms of time, people involved and post-production process. For a 2D filmed video you will usually need a producer or director, a camera operator and a sound recordist. Then the post-production process will involve and offline edit, motion graphics and colour grading. All of this will take about 5 weeks could cost between US$6 500 and US$10 000.With a 360-degree video, however, you’ll need more crew members, including a producer or director, a camera operator, a digital imaging technician a sound recordist and a runner. As mentioned above the post-production process is also more extensive with VR. It will typically include stitching, offline editing, plating, motion graphics and colour grade. This pushes the project timescale to around 7 weeks with costs ranging from US$ 9 000 to US$13 000. But remember, VR projects don’t all cost the same – productions with bigger kit, multiple days of filming and some basic graphics could be around US$13 000 to US$20 000. A high end VR experience with lots of animation could be upward of US$130 000.With VR it’s worth investing in an agency that won’t mess up the postproduction process, and that will be able to advise you on the best shots for your video. You might think that it’s a good idea to have a camera on the floor while people zip past on bikes. While this sounds dynamic in theory, the shot’s perspective will place your viewer on the floor too – which might not be the most comfortable experience. A good VR video agency will point these things out to you, so you can make better, more informed decisions.That said, your VR project also should not eat your entire marketing budget – what good is cool new content if you can’t afford to take it to market?7. Make it audience friendlyAlmost everyone wants to watch VR content but not everyone has the required headsets. If you’re producing an experience to showcase at an event or in the office then no problem, you’ll have the relevant equipment on-hand.If you’re assuming that your viewer has an Oculus Rift at home, your amazing VR experience will fall flat. The best you can do is make sure that your audiences can immerse themselves in your VR content through as many platforms as possible: from Google Cardboard to YouTube to Sulon Q.When producing content that has to be viewed with a headset, give some thought to motion sickness and make sure your viewers won’t feel too nauseous (remember Nintendo’s first attempt at VR that had people literally throwing up?). Relatively static shots are best as they allow viewers to move their heads freely and enjoy their immersive experience without unpleasant side-effects.If you’re still not sure if VR is right for you, consider what you want to use the video for. Will an engaging, immersive video experience get the job done better than a traditional video? If the answer is yes, then you should consider VR. However, you also have to keep your budget and project timeline into account. While VR videos create a great experience they do take longer and are more expensive to make.If you analyze your prospective project according to the 7 characteristics of VR videos listed above, you should get a good idea of whether what you want to achieve can be done through VR and whether you have the budget to make it work. The great thing is, should you decide to attempt VR you don’t have to go at it alone. You don’t have to be a VR expert if you work with an agency that is able to advise you on everything from shooting location to sound effects.If virtual insanity is getting you down and you need some expert guidance, download our Marketer’s Guide to Virtual Reality.last_img read more