Indiana study profiles local pandemic planning problems

first_img “This is aggravated by federal communication efforts that confuse the two,” the researchers write. Rivalry between hospital systems that impaired coordination (though it was found that a mediator could reduce this problem) Vagueness regarding the roles and responsibilities of local public health, emergency management, and healthcare officials In addition, “Several counties with nursing schools operating within their borders have explored the idea of utilizing nursing students as care extenders, but the efficacy of this will depend in part on school decisions on how to respond to a pandemic event and whether to continue operations,” the report says. Also, it was not known whether any of the counties had checked whether students were willing to serve. The study was part of an effort by researchers at Purdue University to develop a planning template for ways to provide surge capacity to care for a flood of patients during a pandemic. The researchers interviewed public health, emergency preparedness, and hospital officials in 11 representative Indiana counties between November 2006 and August 2007; questionnaires were tested in two other counties. Interviews were conducted by telephone and on-site. In line with these plans, nearly all counties had a basic communication plan to inform the public about the disease and the local response and to direct patients to the most appropriate source of care. However, many county planners focused only on media services located within the county, rather than the sources most used by the local citizenry. For example, one surburban county planned to use the only radio station based in the county, a college station with a weak signal, instead of higher-rated TV and radio stations in the next county. In the face of this reality, “Almost all counties were giving consideration to altered standards of care to stretch resources, but were wary of this option due to liability concerns and lack of statutory protection from malpractice claims, a concern heightened by lack of guidance from state and federal governments,” the report states. Unrealistic expectations for outside help, such as material support from the National Guard or the governor’s office—a misperception grounded in experience with localized disasters such as floods In addition, planning and coordination were hindered by blurry agency roles and mismatches between political boundaries and local healthcare market boundaries. The study also showed that most hospitals were hoping to deal with the influx of pandemic flu patients largely by reducing demand for services, mainly through triage systems. Hospital officials expressed concern about making ends meet during the pressures of a pandemic, the study says. One hospital thought it would have to shut down, while others suggested they would have to rely on federal and state disaster assistance funds to get by. “Few considered the fact that most patients would be insured and that they could use usual mechanism to seek reimbursement for care which might provide a revenue stream,” the authors write. “With few exceptions, planners failed to look beyond their borders, whether to identify resources to support their population or to identify additional demand for resources in their jurisdiction,” the researchers write. “Because planning responsibilities are defined by local political jurisdictions, most focused only on those jurisdictions, with efforts to initiate intercounty cooperation rarely noted.” Managing demandMost of the counties chose to deal with hospital capacity problems during a pandemic at least partly by reducing the demand for hospital services, usually by means of a triage system to save hospital beds for those in greatest medical need, the researchers found. Because of concern about spreading flu, officials were discussing plans to separate flu patients from other patients or to locate triage functions outside the hospital, such as in tent clinics or school gyms. Interviews with health officials in 11 Indiana counties showed recent progress in pandemic planning, but also pointed up many difficulties, according to the report in the Journal of Homeland Security and Emergency Management. On the logistical and financial front, the leading concern was possible shortages of medical supplies, especially drugs and personal protective equipment, the researchers found. The economic pressure to run lean operations was cited as an obstacle to the stockpiling of supplies for emergency use. The authors suggest that, given the differences between political units and healthcare service areas, planning for providing surge capacity would be better done at the regional level than the local level. Among misunderstandings, some planners thought a pandemic would involve such high rates of illness and death that planning would be useless, and many officials had unrealistic expectations about getting help from outside sources such as the National Guard or the state governor. Jul 9, 2008 (CIDRAP News) – A study from Indiana reveals a long list of problems hampering county-level planning for pandemic influenza, ranging from misunderstanding of the threat and lack of coordination and resources to rivalry between hospital systems.center_img The researchers, with George H. Avery as first author, found that planners generally had made progress but had a long way to go. Misperception of the threatIn some counties, officials’ view of the likely impact of a pandemic amounted to “a synthesis of misinformation, resulting in a perception of impact which exceeds the worst cases historically observed,” the article states. Using retired physicians, student nursesConcerning staffing, the counties generally had tried to follow guidance in the federal pandemic flu plan, but they ran into some problems with it. For example, most counties had begun to develop a reserve list of retired or inactive physicians and nurses who could help in a pandemic. But local officials complained of a lack of state guidance on licensing and credentials, and few had addressed the problem of malpractice insurance for those workers. “While planners, for the most part, were committing a significant effort in trying to develop a pandemic influenza plan, and in fact had made large strides over the previous year, the plans developed were still crude and required much more work,” the report says. They also note other researchers’ observation that the idea of using alternative sites to provide surge capacity in a pandemic is widespread, but it is not clear just how these sites would work or even if they would be feasible. They write, “Significant barriers exist to the use of alternative care sites for building hospital surge capacity, and any attempt to develop such capacity should focus on how alternative care arrangements fit into the overall local emergency management and healthcare systems. More important than the alternative care site is the strategy for an alternative care system.” In the realm of planning and coordination, one major problem was that political boundaries “bear little resemblance to the geography of local healthcare markets, resulting in a mismatch between the way resources are used and the plans formulated for using them to meet the demands of a pandemic.” The researchers also found various other problems in planning and coordination, including: “This confusion resulted in a sense of helplessness among some planning teams, resulting from a belief that any planning would be rendered useless by the magnitude of the problem,” the report states. “This indicates a need for more care in risk communication by federal, state, international, and academic public health experts.” Local officials were also looking at other tools to limit demand for hospital services, including “public information efforts to convince those with the disease to utilize self-care when possible, creation of dedicated outpatient flu and fever clinics, and public education programs to prevent exposure by encouraging social distancing,” the report states. One county hospital that looked into insurance reimbursement during a pandemic learned that care would be covered only if it was provided in the hospital’s own facility, a restriction that would limit options for expanding capacity, the report notes. Other hospital officials assumed that the pressures of a pandemic would drive insurers into bankruptcy. A message the researchers heard from all the counties was that flu patients would not be the only demand on healthcare organizations during a pandemic. Officials said other healthcare needs would continue, such as trauma, childbirth, and medical emergencies. Consequently, not all beds could be allocated to flu patients, and hospitals will need to take steps to prevent flu from spreading to other patients. For example, several counties expected illness attack rates greater than 50% and a case-fatality rate of 50%. The researchers determined that officials derived this view by linking the high case-fatality rate in the (rare) human cases of H5N1 influenza with the high attack rate in the 1918 pandemic. The scientists grouped their findings into six categories: impact perception, planning and coordination, staffing, logistical and financial barriers, demand management, and dealing with other healthcare needs during a pandemic. Among lessons drawn from their findings, the authors say that legal and institutional barriers may limit planning in ways that are not obvious and that planners may not have the authority to address such problems. “Issues such as insurance reimbursement, malpractice and liability insurance, and scope of practice rules constrain the solution set for local planners, and require policy action at a state or federal level to solve,” they state. Avery GH, Lawley M, Garret S, et al. Planning for pandemic influenza: lessons from the experiences of thirteen Indiana counties. J Homeland Secur Emerg Manage 2008;5(1):29 [Abstract]last_img read more

NFF adopts PPG, sets new league season tentatively to start September/October

first_img Promoted ContentBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them11 Greatest Special Effects Movies Of All Time10 Hyper-Realistic 3D Street Art By OdeithThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show YouWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?12 Countries Whose Technological Progress Amazes14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right Now8 Things You Didn’t Know About CoffeeA Guy Turns Gray Walls And Simple Bricks Into Works Of Art10 Phones That Can Work For Weeks Without Recharging6 Best ’90s Action Movies To Watch Today Loading… Following resolutions passed at an online meeting of the NFF Football Committee, which had in attendance the Chairpersons of all the National Leagues and the President of the Nigeria Referees Association, the Executive Committee of the NFF has adopted PPG, sets new league season tentatively to start September/October. NFF after a holistic consideration of all the issues affecting the leagues (including the status of the leagues before the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic), the impact of the pandemic-induced disruptions, the health, safety and movement restrictive measures in the country, the potential protocols for football resumption, the costs, the financial status of the leagues and clubs, CAF calendar and resolutions of the various leagues as conveyed to the NFF, approved the following: 1. NPFL – The league ends at current Matchday 25 and the Points Per Game (PPG) table will be used to rank the teams in order to ensure sporting merit and sporting fairness. – The names of the Top 3 (three) clubs on the NPFL final PPG table as at Matchday 25 shall be submitted to CAF to represent Nigeria in the 2020/2021 CAF Inter – Club competitions (2 slots for CAF Champions League and 1 Slot for CAF Confederation Cup). – There will be no promotion to, or relegation from, NPFL for the 2019/2020 season. – The NPFL 2020/2021 season will start from September/October 2020 and end May 2021 subject to the full reopening of the country and the approval of the health authorities. 2. The NNL – The NNL 2019/2020 season which is at Match day 3 – 5 and has been on break since December 17, 2019 is cancelled, null and void. – There will be no promotion to, or relegation, from NNL. – The NNL 2020/2021 season will start from September/October 2020 and end May 2021 subject to the full reopening of the country and the approval of the health authorities. – The NFF will work with the NNL, the participating clubs and other stakeholders to ensure a successful fresh start from September/October 2020. This will include a review of the NNL structure to optimize its development. 3. NWFL – The yet-to-commence NWFL 2019/2020 season is aborted.center_img – The NWFL 2020/2021 to start from September/October 2020 and end May 2021 subject to the full reopening of the country and the approval of the health authorities. 4. NLO – The yet to commence NLO 2019/2020 Season aborted. – There will be no promotion to or relegation from NLO. – The NLO 2020/2021 season will start from September/October 2020 to end May 2021 subject to the full reopening of the country and the approval of the health authorities. 5. AITEO CUP – The AITEO Cup 2019/2020 which had only commenced at the State level is aborted. – The 2019 AITEO Cup Winners to be presented to CAF for the 2020/2021 CAF Inter-Club competition (Nigeria’s 2nd slot in the CAF Confederation Cup), reserved for Federation Cup winners. – The AITEO CUP 2020/2021 season to start from September/October 2020 to end May 2021 subject to the full reopening of the country and the approval of the health authorities. . All dates for the 2020/2021season to start are subject to the directives of the Federal Government in line with COVID-19 protocols. read also:NFF to pay Rohr $100,000 for April, May salaries . In addition, the full enforcement of licensing regulations and financial controls for the NPFL will commence from the 2020/2021 season. All clubs are required to comply, failing which they will be barred from participating. The Nigeria Football Federation will formally take the resolutions to the next General Meeting of its Congress for ratification. In the meantime, these resolutions have been formally communicated to the Federal Ministry of Youth & Social Development. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 last_img read more

Bring in your sewing machine for $20 inspection at McDonald’s Sewing & Vacuum

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