Dez Bryant Crashes QB Meeting, Wants More Passing Plays

first_imgAfter throwing a touchdown pass in the Dallas Cowboys’ 42-21 win over Detroit, former Oklahoma State wide receiver Dez Bryant reportedly tried to attend the quarterback meeting the following day.Dez Bryant tried to attend the Cowboys’ QB meeting after throwing a TD vs. Detroit ? https://t.co/VTNuYO4V77 pic.twitter.com/0bgEluNeGo— Bleacher Report (@BleacherReport) December 28, 2016 Bryant became only the fifth player in NFL history to have one passing touchdown and two receiving touchdowns in a single game. Supposedly, Bryant had a cannon for an arm even in his days at OSU.??‍♂️He used to mess around before practice and throw passes. He has a hose. #okstate https://t.co/tR9Zsootu2— Gary Calcagno, M.A., MSCC, RSCC*E (@calcagnogary) December 27, 2016Still, with home-field advantage locked up through the NFC playoffs and not much to play for in the Cowboys’ regular season finale against Philadelphia on Jan. 1, the lefty’s passing career is probably over for now. In the playoffs, though, offensive coordinator Scott Linehan will likely keep Bryant’s passing ability in mind — and it’s safe to say that Bryant will remind him until then. Cowboys VP Stephen Jones: “Dez tried to go to the quarterback meeting this morning. He’s lobbying Scott for more plays.”— Jon Machota (@jonmachota) December 28, 2016center_img While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Photos: Spring Practice Winds Down for Oklahoma State

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. [PFB] Spring practice is nearly over in Stillwater, but we have a few more photos to enjoy before it’s a wrap until the fall. Jackson Lavarnway has been crushing all spring with his photography, and the final practice is no different. Hope you like ’em. [PFB] [PFB]last_img read more

How Ramon Richards Makes OSU’s Offense Better

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Quarterback Mason Rudolph and receiver James Washington agreed on one thing at Big 12 Media Days on Tuesday: Ramon Richards is the one player on the Oklahoma State defense that makes the future NFL Draft picks better, most often.Richards was signed to OSU as an athlete in the 2014 recruiting class. He came out of Brackenridge High School in San Antonio, Texas, having played four years as a defensive back and dual-threat quarterback. He played cornerback, safety and came in for nickel packages, which he has mentioned helped him in the pocket.Now as a senior OSU safety, he is clearly reapplying those lessons he learned about four years ago.“He does a lot pre-snap,” Rudolph said. “I remember in a meeting, him coming to me and saying, ‘Hey, what do you see out there when I’m moving around and I’m giving you keys pre-snap?’”AdChoices广告Richards has eight interceptions in three seasons, which is impressive enough until you hear about the yardage he gained after those eight snags. Richards averages 19.8 yards per interception return for a total of 158 yards, more than one and a half football fields. And he brought 25 percent of those picks back for touchdowns.He was thrown into a starting role as a freshman after Kevin Peterson was injured his senior season in 2014. Washington was also getting serious play time as a freshman starting five games, so he has been around the block and back with Richards.“When he was playing corner, we would go at it all the time,” Washington said.Washington listed off two other players — Peterson and Ashton Lampkin — who have played the same role Richards fills now, which places some implied emphasis on the tenacity of the OSU cornerbacks during practice.“All three of those guys have made me who I am,” Washington said.When he said that at Big 12 Media Days, I was surprised. A Biletnikoff Award finalist with 30 starts, almost 3,000 yards, more than 150 catches and 26 touchdowns in three seasons, gave “who I am” type of credit to three players who haven’t recorded a single stat in the NFL.“KP was always on me, just throwing me out of bounds, wouldn’t let me off the line,” Washington said. “It’d just make you mad. ‘I gotta get him. I gotta get him. I want one more. I want one more.’“I would say he’s really a big factor to my success.”Rudolph’s praise was almost equally as surprising but genuinely placed.“An unbelievable change-of-direction guy,” he said. “He’s doing some different things as far as moving and trying to deceive me. Lately, I don’t know what he’s doing. He tries to cheat because he knows our schemes and how I like to throw the deep ball. He tries to rob some things.”That might sound like Richards is getting little out of practice and Rudolph is just getting frustrated, but it forces Rudolph to learn and adjust. It’s like playing against an extra defender when they know what’s coming, so when it’s 11-on-11, it might seem like 11-on-10.In watching OSU football every year Richards has been a part of the program, one word resurfaces: Scrappy. He might be annoying to play against on the field, willing to do anything to get an edge, but if two potential first-round picks have that level of respect for him, he must have a more significant impact on the team overall than cheating on a play after Rudolph takes a snap in practice.last_img read more

Six-Shooter: Zach Crabtree on McGregor-Mayweather and More

first_imgIntroducing a new series, welcome to the Six-Shooter, a weekly segment with an Oklahoma State athlete where we ask six random, non-sports-related questions to get to know these gals and guys a bit better.Senior offensive tackle Zach Crabtree has been a staple in the Oklahoma State O-line since 2014 when he started eight games as a freshman, but he is far more complex than a nicely cut beard and a football mind.Here is how he faired in this week’s gauntlet of hard-hitting journalism:If you found $1 million in a bag on the side of the road, what would you do with it?“You definitely gotta check and see who the money belongs to. You got to find the source. That’s a lot of money. A million dollars, something’s going on there. I don’t know if I wanna be touching that money. Something went wrong. There could be some dirty stuff going on there.”AdChoices广告Money is not an issue, you have a full range of abilities, but you have a week to live. Where are you going? What are you doing? And who are you spending your last week on Earth with?“I’m going somewhere in the Caribbean. I’ve never been to the Caribbean. I’ve always wanted to. I’m renting a beach house or a hut or something somewhere, and I’m laying up for a week, enjoying the last week and just chillin’ in paradise with some close friends.“My boys (are with me), my family obviously, but definitely my boys just from here. There’s a group of about six of us that have got real close and so we’d probably all be together.“I’d have Mason (Rudolph) with me. I’d have Austin Hays. I’d have Blake Jarwin. We have some other friends that don’t play. I got a boy at Duke. I’d have a close-knit group of friends that I always hang out with.”What’s your favorite cereal?“I’m really a big Special K, Fruit and Yogurt guy. I don’t know if you’ve ever had their Fruit & Yogurt cereal, but it is fantastic. I’m telling ya’ it’s the way to go.“That or Cinnamon Toast Crunch. I can do Cinnamon Toast Crunch.”What is your favorite video game?“Madden. I haven’t played ’17 too much.“Back a couple years ago when I was living with J.W. (Walsh), we used to play Madden nonstop. We would always do three randoms, and you had to pick your random.“I like somebody that does a lot of stuff out of the gun because I like to be able to go up-tempo and pick it apart that way.”When did you know you were a man?“Athletically, probably the first time I ever did a pass set here. I was a true freshman. I got thrown into the fire, and I had to go up against Emmanuel Ogbah as a true freshman. That’ll wake you up in a hurry.“Off the field, probably the first time I got my books and I realized that my athletic ability paid for my opportunity and got me all those books and tuition, so that was probably off the field, that’s when I realized it.”Mayweather or McGregor?“I’m goin’ McGregor.“We had a big debate about this the other day. We had a huge debate about this. I think McGregor’s tougher than (Mayweather) is. The UFC is harder to fight in than boxing. There’s no question about it. You’re looking out for a lot more things, and so you take a leg kick out of it, and now McGregor’s just watching his hands.“And do let Conor McGregor fool you. He wants a knockout. He’s determined. I think he’s probably the best guy that maybe Floyd has fought, talent-wise. He’s strong. He’s tough, and it’s gonna be a little different taking a punch from Conor McGregor than it would (Marcos Maidana) or something. If he connects — that’s the problem is connecting, but if he connects, I think it’s gonna be over.”Bonus: Nickname is “60”After Rudolph wrapped up his media duties, he looked at Crabtree, who was still doing an interview, a few feet away and said, “All right, 60, you ready for lunch.”That’s an awesome nickname. Don’t know if you can beat that as an offensive lineman. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Talking Touch – May

first_imgTo view the stories, please click on the links below. Mudgee’s Yeo receives NSW Touch Football life membershipMudgee Touch Association treasurer Jim Yeo was made a life member of the NSW Touch Association at their annual general meeting on Saturday.Yeo has been involved in touch football since the mid 1980s.http://www.mudgeeguardian.com.au/news/local/sport/other/mudgees-yeo-receives-nsw-touch-football-life-membership/2545902.aspx Coffs scores National Touch LeagueCoffs Harbour has added another national sporting jewel to its crown with Touch Football Australia announcing the National Touch League will be held at BCU International Stadium for the next two years.The announcement sees the competition return to its spiritual home of Coffs Harbour, which held the first ever National Touch League in 1997.http://www.coffscoastadvocate.com.au/story/2012/05/18/coffs-scores-national-touch-league/ Baggio rated NSW’s best touch refWagga Touch Football referee David Baggio has been rewarded for his fine form this season. Baggio was awarded the Ian Matthew Medal as NSW’s best referee at a recent awards night and has been named the second best whistle-blower in the world.Baggio was awarded the Ian Matthew Medal as NSW’s best referee at a recent awards night and has been named the second best whistle-blower in the world.http://www.dailyadvertiser.com.au/news/local/sport/other/baggio-rated-nsws-best-touch-ref/2553551.aspx Runners Endurance Put To The TestImagine trekking through the rugged Blue Mountains for 100km, lugging a backpack containing no fewer than three spare pairs of shoes and finishing in complete darkness as the race clock ticks past its 16th hour.Can’t do it? You’re probably not alone.University of Wollongong student Michael Chapman knows exactly what it’s like – and he’s set for a repeat dose at the WildEndurance challenge which starts today.http://www.illawarramercury.com.au/news/local/sport/other/runners-endurance-put-to-the-test/2545352.aspx The Fitz Files – Team of the WeekThe Australian men’s, women’s and mixed touch football teams. All won their trans-Tasman Tests against New Zealand in Mudgee last week. RAH!http://www.smh.com.au/sport/the-fitz-files/suicide-a-blow-for-highimpact-sports-20120504-1y3zb.html#ixzz1wUWfF4YHSeven Hills: Touch football victory for Hills Sports HighHills Sports High School at Seven Hills is celebrating after making history at last week’s NSW All Schools Touch Football Championships.The school’s boys’ and girls’ teams won their divisions and became the first school to hold both trophies aloft.http://blacktown-advocate.whereilive.com.au/sport/story/seven-hills-touch-football-victory-for-hills-sports/ Politicians keep in touch with their statesPoliticians swapped their pressed suits for sweaty gym gear this morning to decide who would be the winner of political State of Origin.ACT Labor MP Andrew Leigh, Graham Perrett, Barnaby Joyce, Andrew Laming, Darren Chester, Scott Buchholz, Craig Kelly, Michael McCormack, Shayne Numann, Bert van Manen and Matt Thistlethwaite braved this morning’s chilly morning to find out who could cross the try-line without a touch from the opposition.http://www.canberratimes.com.au/national/politicians-keep-in-touch-with-their-states-20120523-1z4bb.html Mudgee Mudcrabs’ high hopesMudgee Mudcrabs are hoping to come back from Dubbo this weekend with the mixed opens Country Championships trophy in their possession.For the first time in a number of years Mudgee will compete at the Touch NSW event at Dubbo’s Riverside Playing Fields.http://www.mudgeeguardian.com.au/news/local/sport/other/mudgee-mudcrabs-high-hopes/2568218.aspx Touch great to boost TareeA Touch Football hall of fame member will help bolster Taree over 50 men’s side’s campaign at the Country Championships to be held at Dubbo this weekend.One of the game’s greats, Mick McCall, has agreed to play with the Taree squad. http://www.manningrivertimes.com.au/news/local/sport/general/touch-great-to-boost-taree/2569010.aspx Finishing Touches To Help Make For A Successful Carnival It takes a lot of hard work to keep an annual sporting event running for 22 years straight but that is the scenario that faces Dubbo Touch Association this weekend when it hosts the NSW Country Championships.With the finishing touches being put on the association’s new clubhouse, 84 teams will roll into Dubbo to prepare for the two-day event, which will kick off early tomorrow morning.http://www.dailyliberal.com.au/news/local/sport/other/finishing-touches-to-help-make-for-a-successful-carnival/2568314.aspx Mudgee Mudcrabs Anguish LossMudgee Mudcrabs had a heartbreaking exit from the Touch NSW Country Championships in Dubbo on the weekend, losing their mixed open quarter final match in a drop-off.The team, which was a mixture of youth and experience, performed exceptionally well, comfortably winning their pool before losing to Forster Tuncurry 5-4 in a three-on-three drop-off.http://www.mudgeeguardian.com.au/news/local/sport/other/mudgee-mudcrabs-anguish-loss/2572583.aspx Touch Of Genius For AussiesRockhampton’s Daniel Withers is the perfect example of how touch football in Central Queensland is leading the way in Australia.The local touch footballer has scored some winning form for the Queensland Open Men’s Team after helping Australia reclaim the Trans Tasman Title in Mudgee, New South Wales. http://www.themorningbulletin.com.au/story/2012/05/17/touch-of-genius-for-aussies-football-cq/ Harragon And Crew Bring Fine Touch To ClubhouseFormer Newcastle Knights captain Paul Harragon and his Tooheys New Crew will be in Dubbo this week to lend a hand in the construction of the new Dubbo Touch Association Clubhouse, which will be located at Riverbank Ovals.Mr Harragon said along with his team of skilled tradies, he expected a big Dubbo crowd to come and participate in the construction of the club house on the day.http://www.dailyliberal.com.au/news/local/news/general/harragon-and-crew-bring-fine-touch-to-clubhouse/2564388.aspx?src=rss&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=twitter Jenna’s On A MissionTrinity Catholic College student Jenna Lees is aiming to make the Under-19 NSW Combined Catholic College touch team next month.Lees was picked in the Under-19 Lismore Diocesan team after the championships were held at Hepburn Park, Goonellabah, on Tuesday.http://www.northernstar.com.au/story/2012/05/10/jenna-lees-on-a-mission-touch-foootball/ Lismore Diocesan Touch Champions CrownedHarbour’s John Pauls College has outplayed 11 north coast teams to take out this year’s Under 19 males Diocesan Touch Championships. http://www.nbnnews.com.au/index.php?s=touch Hilder Will Stick AroundNational touch star Kylie Hilder has reconsidered retirement following a successful trans-tasman series as a member of the Australian Mixed Touch team in Mudgee.“I thought it would be (my last time) but I got given the captaincy which was a massive thing and I also got given the flag-bearing duties which is massive as well,” Kylie said.http://www.greatlakesadvocate.com.au/news/local/sport/other/hilder-will-stick-around/2549781.aspx Vying For Higher HonoursMore than 45 touch football teams from the border to Port Macquarie have battled it out in Lismore today.They were all vying for championship honours, but also the chance to represent the zone in Tamworth next month.http://au.prime7.yahoo.com/n3/news/a/-/national/13635346/vying-for-higher-honours-video/ Young Star Already Has The Right TouchThe burning question about Ashleigh Quinlan is this.Will she do a reverse James Tamou with pike?http://www.blacktownsun.com.au/news/local/sport/rugby-league/young-star-already-has-the-right-touch/2572558.aspx Touch titles back where they belongCoffs Coast Advocate, 19/05/2012Top class touch football is returning to the Coffs Coast.It was announced this week that the National Touch League is returning to BCU International Stadium for the next two years.The 2013 National Touch League is scheduled for March with an announcement of the exact dates to be made later this year.Touch Football Australia’s announcement sees the competition return to its spiritual home of Coffs Harbour, which hosted the first ever National Touch League in 1997.Coffs Harbour Mayor Keith Rhoades said the city was delighted to welcome the National Touch League back once more.“The tournament was played here for more than 10 years and became a very popular part of our sporting calendar,” Cr Rhoades said.“Since then we’ve improved the BCU International Stadium even further with the digital TV-standard floodlights and other works.“We are confident that we can offer the players, officials and supporters one of the best regional sports grounds they have ever experienced in regional NSW – and our famous warm welcome.”The hosting rights is a major coup for Coffs Harbour after a competitive tender process saw it beat out multiple submissions from all across New South Wales to hold the 2013 and 2014 events.Coffs Harbour MP Andrew Fraser was also pleased with the news. “I am proud Coffs Harbour has been chosen to host the National Touch League in 2013 and 2014,” Mr Fraser said.“These national events will generate a huge buzz for the town with spectators, participants, family and friends no doubt keen to enjoy the competition, speed and agility of touch football.”Steph On Her Bike In Memory Of UncleNorthern Daily Leader, 17/05/2012Steph Halpin will compete in a charity ride later this year in honour of her uncle Chris.Tamworth’s Steph Halpin is swapping her touch football boots for bike and helmet to help conquer cancer. The Australian touch representative will embark on one of the biggest challenges of her sporting life in October when she competes in The Sunsuper Ride to Conquer Cancer benefiting The Chris O’Brien Lifehouse at RPA (Royal Prince Alfred Hospital).The two-day 200km ride will include a night of camping and take participants through some of the state’s scenic countryside.Their efforts will support breakthrough research and the discovery of new cancer therapies at The Chris O’Brien Lifehouse at RPA. The cause is one one close to Halpin’s heart. “I’m doing it in memory of my uncle Chris,” she said. The local identity was diagnosed with bowel cancer in 2010 and over a period of 10 months fought a very brave and courageous battle through chemotherapy sessions and lots of medical testing.Sadly, he lost his fight in December that year. He was an inspiration to his niece in many ways, not only through his fight with cancer and hunger to beat the disease but also through their shared passion for sport and she believes this ride is the perfect way to remember him and actively participate in an event that benefits others and their families who are doing it tough with cancer. She has already started preparing. “I’m training with a good friend of mine from Newcastle who’s doing it with me,” she said. “We do riding during the week then Saturday morning we do a group ride.” At the moment they’re averaging about 60-70km a session. It has been a bit of a sporting release for Halpin. “I had a pretty bad back injury and haven’t played touch since the World Cup (in June last year),” she said. “The only thing I can do is swimming and riding.” She hopes to raise at least $2500.To help her reach this goal, visit conquercancer.org.au to make a donation online, or call 1300 33 RIDE and quote participant number 861900-2.If you see a story from your local media organisations about Touch Football and would like to see it on the Touch Football Australia website, please email media@austouch.com.au.last_img read more

A simple picture to sharpen your focus

first_imgI’ve shared this before, but it bears repeating: Your organization should dwell in the intersection of this picture, which is a combination of thinking from Jim Collins’ hedgehog concept and BBMG‘s branding thinking. If you don’t know which program to pursue or which message to choose, ask yourself: which reflects all three of these factors?That’s where you focus.last_img

Women and Mosquito Nets

first_imgPosted on June 18, 2012June 16, 2017By: Bill Brieger, Senior Malaria Specialist, JHPIEGOClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of a blog series on Malaria in Pregnancy. To view the entire series, click here. This post was originally posted on Malaria Matters.While we have seen a push for universal coverage of long lasting insecticide-treated bed nets (ITNs/LLINs), it is still important to remember that pregnant women are a more vulnerable group that needs protection. Malaria in pregnant women can lead to anemia and even death for women–as well as miscarriage, low birth weight babies, and greater infant and child mortality. So far, the data on net coverage for pregnant women is not encouraging. Nets are extremely important because they are the one safe malaria control intervention that women can use right from the start of pregnancy.Recent Demographic and Health and Malaria Indicator Surveys (DHS and MIS) show a common problem. The graph here shows general access to LLINs is low (orange bars) in many countries relative to the Roll Back Malaria target of 80% coverage by 2010. What is of equal concern is that even when households possess nets, pregnant women do not always use them (blue bars). Rwanda, with its strong national network of community health workers, is the exception. What is discouraging women?The Liberia MIS asks why people do not own nets, and since these surveys prioritize interviewing women of reproductive age, we may assume that these reasons express the views of women. A few do not perceive mosquitoes to be a problem (especially in the dry season), some simply do not like to sleep under nets while others complain of the cost. The latter is curious because nets are primarily provided for free these days.Clearly, we need more information on the dynamics of net use at the household level. Field visits after a universal coverage campaign in Akwa Ibom State in Nigeria discovered that women themselves see alternative uses for nets. One picture shows LLINs covering vegetable gardens that are tended by women in this community. Maybe they believe the nets will keep insects off their vegetables, although the sun will soon render the insecticide ineffective.Another picture shows that a woman has protected the wares in her small kiosk by covering it with a LLIN. Customers can still see the wares but insects can’t nibble at the food items on sale (nor children easily pilfer some).Both of these examples highlight the economic roles of women in the community. In most communities in Nigeria, income from a woman is crucial to the welfare of her child. Are women making net decisions on their perceptions of what is in their best economic interest?The issue of nets for pregnant women will be one of the issues discussed during the upcoming meeting, Malaria in Pregnancy: A Solvable Problem—Bringing the Maternal Health and Malaria Communities Together, in Istanbul, Turkey, June 26-28, 2012, organized by the Maternal Health Task Force.Stay tuned to the MHTF Blog and Malaria Matters for updates from the meeting.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Investing in Midwifery to Ensure Respectful Maternity Care at the Aberdeen Women’s Centre

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 15, 2013March 8, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Guest post by Fistula Care. With just 1 midwife for every 1000 live births, Sierra Leone needs a twelve-fold increase in its midwifery workforce to ensure full coverage of maternal and newborn health services.  It is tempting to focus exclusively on training new midwives, but existing midwives also require attention. They can only function effectively if their own professional needs are met. The Aberdeen Women’s Centre in Freetown, Sierra Leone, provides an example of what a midwife-led maternity unit can look like: where midwives have the support they need to do their jobs well, and where mothers and babies therefore receive respectful, high-quality services.An important new article in the Midwifery’s forthcoming Millennium Development Goals special issue describes in detail a practical example of how we can “invest in midwives” and equip them to offer competent, compassionate, and respectful care to expecting and delivering mothers. “Striving for excellence: Nurturing midwives’ skills in Freetown, Sierra Leone” recounts how the Aberdeen Women’s Centre launched a maternity unit focused on supporting midwives to offer exemplary care.The Aberdeen Women’s Centre is a private clinic that was founded in 2005 to provide surgical repair to women who suffer from obstetric fistula. The Centre’s focus on fistula treatment remained constant until one of its own staff died in childbirth. In the wake of this loss, the clinic’s leaders began to consider expanding their mandate. They saw an opportunity to offer quality maternity care to women who would be unable to pay, thereby preventing the occurrence of new fistula cases and reducing maternal mortality. With support from the Gloag Foundation and U.S. Agency for International Development (via EngenderHealth’s Fistula Care project), the Aberdeen Women’s Centre opened its midwife-led maternity unit in May 2010.The Centre provided ongoing in-service education and supportive supervision for its staff midwives. Expert midwife volunteers served as mentors, modeling a commitment to quality, evidence-based care. Through training and routine review of near-misses, the Aberdeen Women’s Centre midwives have developed professionally and are poised to become future leaders for midwifery in Sierra Leone.Meanwhile, these midwives have offered an excellent level of care to delivering mothers and their newborns. In the first two years of the maternity unit’s services, its staff assisted 2,076 births, with better-than-expected health outcomes for mothers and babies.For more, visit the Respectful Maternity Care blog series.Share this:last_img read more

Jacaranda Health Staff Connect Nutrition and Maternal Health Through Human-centered Design Course

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 30, 2013June 12, 2017By: Grace Lesser, Knowledge Manager, Jacaranda HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post originally appeared on the cross-posted from the Jacaranda Health blog. To learn more about Jacaranda’s work, visit their website. Human-centered design (HCD) has been part of Jacaranda’s approach to providing high-quality, affordable maternal health care since our inception. In the past year and a half we have consistently used design sessions to understand healthseeking behaviors and develop our model. During one of our HCD sessions, two participants role-played the typical interaction between a clinician and a patient, demonstrating a “good” and a “bad” nurse. The group then put themselves in the shoes of a patient to envision how they would like to be treated. During another exercise, Jacaranda staff generated strategies for increasing male involvement in maternity care. They talked to men on the street, in barbershops, and in bars to develop a deeper understanding of male views on maternity and how we can provide more inclusive services.We have always been driven by the pursuit of understanding those we serve, and hold the core belief that our clients hold the knowledge about how to best design an effective service delivery system.Most recently, Jacaranda’s engagement in HCD went even deeper. Two groups of clinical staff enrolled in a self-led, +Acumen/Ideo.org supported HCD for Social Innovation course, and for the past five weeks met on a weekly basis to look at ‘barriers to good nutrition’. The groups had readings and discussion sessions each week, where they used the principles of human centered design to consider the topic from the perspective of our clients. The discussion sessions had a rotating leader, and outside of class participants talked to players at every stage of the healthy eating chain: Farmers, pregnant women at our maternity hospital, community members, those responsible for food procurement and financial accounting. They distilled the information they had collected in brainstorm sessions with post-it notes, and came up with ideas and solutions – no matter how crazy or farfetched – to address the problem of poor nutrition. The ultimate goal was to create a tangible prototype that could be tested with Jacaranda maternity clients and ultimately improve healthy eating and nutrition.By the end of the HCD course, an interesting phenomenon occurred. Although both groups were looking at the same exact same target population – Jacaranda clients – each created their prototype based on a different premise. The first group determined that clients may not have basic knowledge about healthy eating do’s and don’ts, so began with education. They created a set of patient education materials, one to be published in a local newspaper and the other to be posted in the Jacaranda waiting room. In contrast, the second group assumed that pregnant women know what to eat; they just often do not have  adequate resources. They created a burlap sack kitchen garden growing four sets of iron-rich greens that pregnant women can re-create in their home.This coming week, the groups will present their prototype and get feedback from the target communities. Next, they will reunite in the final session of the course to share their learnings with the rest of the team. In our own backyard, the HCD course has already affected the Jacaranda kitchen, as our cooks (also participants in the course!) have taken a deeper look at the nutrition we provide to clients. Clinical staff were so invigorated by their engagement in the course that they’ve expressed interest in participating in another online HCD course, with a new topic, in the next few months.Share this:last_img read more

Family Care International Reflects on “A Price Too High to Bear”

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 24, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In a post featured last week on Family Care International’s blog, Vice President Martha Murdock provides an in-depth discussion of A Price too High to Bear, a new report documenting the far-reaching consequences of maternal deaths on families in Kenya. She writes:Last week in Nairobi, a range of partners — from the Kenyan government, UN agencies, donor countries, and many NGOs and research organizations from the national and county levels — came together for a presentation of new research that has the potential to increase the momentum of efforts to save the lives of nearly 300,000 women who die each year (5,500 of them in Kenya) from causes related to pregnancy and childbirth.Each of these avoidable, premature deaths is a tragedy in its own right, and a terrible injustice. Each of these women — some of them barely more than girls — has a right to life and health, and to a standard of health care that protects her from preventable illness, injury, and death.But we who work to improve maternal health have argued for years that each of these deaths also brings countless additional layers of loss, pain, and destruction. The tragic, sudden death of a woman in the prime of life — in many cases already a mother and often the most economically productive member of the family — begins a cascade of loss and pain that upends the lives of those around her: her newborn baby (if it survives) and her older children, husband, parents, and other members of her family and community.Up until now, however, we haven’t had the hard data to support our case, to help us persuade governments, donors, and policy makers that investments in maternal health are also investments in children, in stable families, in education and community development, and ultimately in stronger national economies. Now, thanks to a study conducted in Kenya by FCI, the International Center for Research on Women (ICRW), and the KEMRI-CDC Research and Public Health Collaboration, we know that the data behind that argument is very powerful indeed.To read the full post, and view some of the news coverage prompted by the report, visit the FCI blog.Share this:last_img read more