Fiammetta: Enthusiastic postseason hopes simply illusions

first_imgCOLUMBUS, Ohio – Wisconsin’s first trip to Ohio Stadium since 2009 was so cruel to the Badgers that you’d have to wonder if some sort of karmic revolt conspired to shatter the hearts of Bret Bielema & co. one more time.In the span of one week, the Badgers have plummeted from a team with national title aspirations, and a quarterback with Heisman Trophy hopes, to one wondering how far it can sputter with the wheels fallen off and the season having taken the worst possible turn.But for all the misery that, for whatever reasons, struck a team and a fan base so gosh-darn happy to finally have a seemingly elite squad that would once again carry Wisconsin to the BCS promised land, there are very clear reasons why it was all a flash in the pan. The Badgers, for all their sheer brilliance through the season’s first six games, are simply not as good as everyone thought.It was absolutely so exciting for Wisconsin to get behind Russell Wilson and drive the RussellManiaXVI Heisman campaign, and the fact that a Rose Bowl berth was suddenly designated as Plan B is a resounding testament to the progress this program has made over the past two years.And while a return trip to Pasadena remains scarcely feasible, the Badgers’ first two true road tests of the season proved that this team just wasn’t ready for actual upper-echelon status. Calling them “fraudulent” is likely a bit excessive – they did fall by a combined 10 points in two of the toughest environments in the country – but the Badgers showed over the past two weeks that all the illusions of grandeur envisaged in Madison really were just illusions.The statement reeks of clich? over-simplification, but to a great extent, it’s true – legitimately great teams win on the road. Squads “destined” for postseason greatness do not allow two blocked punts in back-to-back weekends, on the road in the heart of the Big Ten schedule. Teams that finish atop conference standings and computer rankings follow up on quick starts; they don’t get outscored 26-0 in the second quarters of two games after opening the first quarters with 21 unanswered points.The realizations discovered Saturday night in Columbus are harsh, and the numbers only bolster their sting. Wilson finished 20-of-32 for 253 yards, three touchdowns and zero interceptions, but he missed more throws than he had in any game (as a Badger) to date. Montee Ball, despite finishing with a 5-yards-per-carry average, was held to just 85 yards and one touchdown rushing and receiving respectively. Wisconsin’s rushing attack as a whole mustered only 89 yards, the first time the Badgers have failed to eclipse the 100-yard mark since Nov. 21, 2009, at Northwestern.Wisconsin even exited Ohio Stadium with a plus-one turnover margin, though its greatest miscue – the blocked punt in the third quarter – proved more critical than any negative play from Ohio State. The blunders committed by the Badgers over the past two games have been so monumental that it’s a wonder they were able to mount desperate comebacks not only once, but twice.That speaks to the unmistakable talent on this team, but it also highlights a sizable void that, until it’s filled, will bar Wisconsin from maximizing its potential. The Badgers lost so much following the Rose Bowl – J.J. Watt’s mesmerizing ability to produce in the biggest moments and his sheer willpower, as well as the aggressive leadership on and off the field of Gabe Carimi and John Moffitt – that it’s kind of a wonder national title hopes once seemed so genuine.The abrupt fall from grace normally would provoke questions regarding the leadership on this team, but even the most brief look at Wisconsin’s four captains seems to debunk them. Wilson, though far from perfect against the Buckeyes, put the Badgers firmly in the national title picture and very nearly avoided this midseason collapse with two stellar late, late comebacks on the road. Bradie Ewing, reliable as ever, played one of his finest games in Columbus, providing a tremendous safety blanket for Wilson in the passing game in addition to usual well-rounded contributions. Aaron Henry and Patrick Butrym continue to lead as necessary and produce without much fanfare, though they’ve clearly anchored their respective positions.Perhaps a different picture has unfolded behind the scenes, in the locker room, than the one that’s been painted under the spotlight of the media. Speculating any further is an injustice to a team that nevertheless has put itself in position to have something to play for in November and December. With some help – and/or further chaos in the Big Ten – a trip to the conference title game in Indianapolis is indeed still possible, though the Badgers absolutely must win the remainder of their games.So many questions were born Saturday night, and a few more answers likely would provide a little relief for a fan base that is aching for some. With that said, the most concrete takeaway from this weekend is obvious. For all the promise this season appeared to hold, the Badgers were just not for real.Mike is a senior majoring in journalism. Where does this team go from here? Share your thoughts with him on Twitter @mikefiammetta and be sure to follow @BHeraldSports for all the latest Badgers news.last_img read more

Man granted bail on assault charge

first_imgCharged: Ronald SeecharanThirty-four-year-old Ronald Seecharan on Monday appeared before Chief Magistrate Ann McLennan at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts to answer to the charge of unlawful assault.Seecharan, a mechanic who resides at Number 4 Village, West Coast Berbice, pled not guilty to the charge which stated that on March 29, 2019, at Aranka, Aranga Junction, he maliciously assaulted Lester McKenzie, causing him to be hospitalised.It was alleged that on the day in question, the two men were involved in a heated argument. It was during the argument that Seecharan armed himself with a cutlass and dealt the virtual complainant several chops about his body.Police Prosecutor Gordon Mansfield did not object to bail being granted, provided that is under the condition that the accused report to the Aranka Police Station on Friday.Bail was granted in the sum of $70,000 and the matter was transferred to the Bartica Magistrate’s Court for April 11, 2019.last_img read more

5 Easy Tips For Creating an Awesome Title Sequence

first_imgGrab your audience from the get-go with a perfectly executed title sequence!In terms of production value, the difference between a project shot for $10,000 and one shot for $1,000,000 isn’t all that different any more. Cameras like the RED EPIC DRAGON have opened up the ability for low budget filmmakers to create final products that can rival productions with many times their budget.Yet, no matter how good the camera tech gets, there are always going to be certain elements that can give away a low budget film – one of which is the opening title sequence. Most commonly, low budget films make one of two choices when it comes to their opening titles. They will either:A) Go overboard and attempt to create a heavily animated After Effects style title sequence, or…B) Will keep things simple and overlay text on the edit itself, or on a black background.Unless you are a professional After Effects artist, I would always recommend going with option B. Attempting to create an elaborate title sequence by yourself will not work 99% of the time, and the vast majority of projects simply don’t need it. In fact, the current trend today with films of all sizes is leaning towards fewer titles (if any) up front, and going for a more minimalistic approach with regards to the design.While there is no such thing as a one size fits all solution for any creative choice, I do recommend following these 5 tips which will keep you basic titles looking clean and professional:1. Keep the font small.One of my biggest pet peeves is watching the title sequence of an independent film, only to be completely thrown off by awkwardly sized titles. There is no reason to have opening titles take up half of your screen real estate, and unless you are intentionally going for a certain look (such as block text that covers almost the whole screen), keep your titles nice and small.I recommend finding a size that is just comfortable enough to read without squinting your eyes, but not much bigger than that. The main title card with the film’s name is the exception to this rule, and you can always have that title appear much larger so it stands out from the rest. However, for any and all other titles, small is almost always better – so never up your font size unless absolutely necessary.2. Choose a tasteful font.This one is going to sound like a no-brainer, but one of the biggest faux-pas that I see with regards to titles are really poor font choices. I highly advise not using any textured fonts. In other words, fonts that have a grungy or spray painted look (or anything else overly stylized) can look very cheap.Again, there are exceptions to this rule as well, but typically clean and simple fonts will always work better. Keep in mind that if your film is successful, it will hopefully be seen for many years to come. So, the last thing you want is to get stuck with a font that ends up dating your movie.While not specifically focused on filmmaking, here’s a great roundup from Grantland’s Rembert Browne that explores the hilariously dated universe of 90s sitcom openings.3. Don’t animate the titles.A few years ago, a trend started that involved animating titles to match the picture. So, for example, there might be a shot of a bus crossing the screen, and then the titles might follow along behind it. This fad has largely died off, yet so many indie filmmakers are still attempting to animate their titles to elements on the screen in hopes that it will add some production value.Simple is always better in my opinion, and 9 times out of 10, you are going to be better off just fading in a static title over picture (or black) than animating it to achieve an unoriginal effect.4. Use framing guides.I can tell from a mile away when an editor hasn’t used framing guides with their titles. One title will fade into the next and they will just be slightly off from each other. Or a main title that is supposed to be centered will feel like it’s off to one side or the other.It takes you practically no time to turn on your framing guides and snap your titles to the right position on the screen, so whatever you do, please make sure you don’t skimp out on this step.5. Avoid drop shadows.I mentioned above that certain font choices can really date the look of your film, and the use of drop shadows can pose the same issue. Drop shadows can look okay in certain circumstances, especially when they are part of the overall aesthetic of the film’s brand, however they should never be used simply because the text needs to stand out more. For example, if you are trying to put one of your title cards on a shot that has a high contrast background, and the title isn’t showing up properly – you might be tempted to add a drop shadow. This is the logical thing to do, but at the same time it will change the overall feel of your titles. If you absolutely have to use drop shadows, then go for it – but just make sure that you use them across the board on all of your titles so at least there is a sense of consistency.Interested in reading more about the art of the title sequence? Check out these articles from the PremiumBeat blog.Creative Inspiration: The History of the Title SequenceCreate a ‘True Detectives’ Style Title Sequence in After EffectsCinema 4D Tutorial: Create Animated Title SequencesWhat are some of your favorite movie title sequences? What’s the secret to making a title sequence stand out? Let’s discuss in the comments below.last_img read more

Patellar dislocation

first_imgDislocation usually occurs as a result of sudden direction changes while running and the knee is under stress or it may occur as a direct result of injury.Review Date:6/13/2010Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, MD, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington, School of Medicine; and C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.last_img read more