GAA NEWS: JUSTIN BRADY MEMORIAL MATCH TAKES PLACE AT MacCUMHAILL PARK

first_imgSEAN MacCUMHAILL CLUB NOTESJUSTIN BRADY MEMORIALThe Justin Brady Memorial match will take place in Mac Cumhaill Park on New Years Eve at 4.30pm. Its the married men against the single lads.Bring the family along to watch the match and enjoy the refreshments in the bar afterwards.Guaranteed good craic! DINNER DANCE.The dinner dance will be held in the club on the 17th Jan.Tickets are limited and advance purchase is recommended.Music is by Ray Montana and tickets are available from the bar or from any Committee member.Lets get a great crowd out to support this event.CLUB AGM The AGM will be held in the Center on the 23rd of Jan. Nomination forms can be downloaded from the club website www.seanmaccumhaill.com, just click on the download section,or alternatively if you wish to have a form posted to you please contact the club secretary Mickey Mc Mahon on 0860242882 or secretary.seanmccools.donegal@gaa.ie. We would like all members to attend this meeting.LOTTOThere was no winner of this weeks Lotto.There was 1 match 3 winner. Peter Dunnion receives €150. This weeks jackpot is €3,100.BINGOThe Bingo is back in the Villa Rose this week. 8.30pm start. The Snowball jackpot is €9,000 for 45 numbers or less. ll very welcome.DONEGAL YEARBOOKThe Donegal yearbook is now on sale. Please contact Eugene Gallagher 0866098801 for a copy.GAA NEWS: JUSTIN BRADY MEMORIAL MATCH TAKES PLACE AT MacCUMHAILL PARK was last modified: December 29th, 2014 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Sean MacCumhaill Club noteslast_img read more

Ramon Laureano taking at bats, running every other day as return date nears

first_imgKANSAS CITY — It’s been five weeks since Ramon Laureano fell on the 10-day IL with a stress reaction in his shin. Doctors told him back then he’d need a 4-to-6 week recovery period.It looks like Laureano could return to the lineup well within that frame. He’s taking at bats and running every other day, a routine that could be enough to prevent a trip to Stockton or Las Vegas for a rehab assignment.“We’d consider this the rehab assignment, facing pitchers,” manager Bob Melvin said. “They’re …last_img read more

SA to ensure new visa rules don’t harm tourism

first_img27 June 2014 South Africa’s new immigration regulations are being scrutinised by the Department of Tourism to ensure that they do not negatively influence tourist arrivals, Tourism Minister Derek Hanekom said in a statement on Wednesday. The department had received representations from tourism stakeholders on the possible “unintended consequences” of some of the provisions brought into effect by the new Immigration Act signed into law on 2 June, the minister said. Hanekom said that while the regulation of immigration matters was the constitutional responsibility of the Department of Home Affairs, “any matter that could have a detrimental impact on international tourist arrivals” to South Africa was a concern. Industry representatives say they are concerned about two specific provisions in the new regulations: the requirement for minors to travel with unabridged birth certificates, and the collection of biometric data (fingerprints and photographs) – which must be done in person at visa offices. Industry stakeholders told Hanekom they believed these measures could influence the competitiveness of South Africa as a tourism destination. Hanekom acknowledged that while the new regulations reflected South Africa’s commitment to combating child trafficking, that the prospect of “unforeseen and unintended negative consequences” should be taken seriously. “Like many other destinations, we have a dual imperative: we have to combat child trafficking by aligning our approach to global efforts, while limiting damage to our competitiveness as a tourism destination.” The minister said his department and industry stakeholders were studying global best practice on these broader policy challenges as well as on the practicalities of implementing such measures. Officials from the Department of Tourism were in “urgent discussions” with their counterparts in Home Affairs to clarify any misperceptions and to find appropriate solutions. Hanekom said he would meet Home Affairs Minister Malusi Gigaba to follow up on these discussions if required. “I want to assure our trade partners and other industry stakeholders that as government, we understand the value of travel and tourism, which has grown so impressively over the past few years. “We will carefully consider any negative impacts of well-intentioned measures on international tourist arrivals and the attractiveness of our destination.” Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

The Rank Nazi: Your Content Is Not Worthy, No Rank For You! [cartoon]

first_imgShare . The book’s been a runaway success (I think it’s because of the cartoons, but my co-author thinks its the marketing advice — you decide). Inbound Marketing: Get Found Using Google, Social Media and Blogs Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack By the way, if you’re a Seinfeld fan, what’s your favorite episode/scene?  (I’m looking for more ideas for future cartoons).center_img Looking to get more organic traffic from Google? You need to create content that’s worthy! (Yes, it’s that simple.  Not easy, but simple). Originally published Nov 6, 2009 3:18:00 PM, updated March 21 2013 If you liked this cartoon, you can find more cartoons in the recently released book:last_img read more

SEO Lessons From Email Spammers

first_img customers is, “there are only two types of people that fill out contact us forms, people that are desperate and people that are trying to sell you something.”  An email like the one above falls into the latter category. “We are interested to increase traffic to your website, please get back to us in order to discuss the possibility in further detail.” Being someone who teaches people how to increase traffic to their website on a daily basis I decided to take the bait and see just how they could “help” me. Originally published Jun 25, 2010 2:00:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 Download the Webinar Now .  So what is the point of ranking if you are wasting all that traffic?  These visitors will leave your website and NEVER come back.  Don’t fall into this trap! HubSpot If you have a contact form on your website and have not gotten a message like this in the past then consider yourself either very lucky or you aren’t getting any traffic at all.  A common line I regularly tell WHOIS to gather Domain Name information about me and grabbed my number.  I don’t have a land line so they called my cell phone and probably like most people I don’t answer the phone when I don’t recognize the number.  An interesting voicemail was left and an email was sent back to me shortly with the following information. compelling conversion forms to convert leads Have you ever received an email saying something like this: Despite that I’ll see if I can answer your questions.  See below. SEO I never received an email back, but a few days later I received a phone call.  Kind of creepy right!?  How did these people find my phone number?  Then I remembered that they probably used a service like So what I really hope that you get from this story is that getting traffic to your website isn’t something that you can simply “outsource” like this.  Think about it this way.  You pay all this money and these guys get you ranked #1 on the perfect keyword.  Search engines start sending traffic to your website.  The content on your website sucks and you don’t have anything of real value or any New Media thought leader, Brian Solis, shares how to implement and manage a Social Media Optimization (SMO) program. I don’t understand.  You guys filled out a form on my website and sent an email to my address and still don’t know what my domain name is?  You reached out to me. Marketing Takeaway Free Webinar-On-Demand: Social Media Optimization Is The New SEO With Brian Solis Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack This was all about six weeks ago and I still haven’t heard back from them.  I think it’s safe to assume that the gig is up.  They realized they were dealing with someone who wasn’t completely clueless. Topics: “Sure, I’d love to increase traffic to my website.  How can you help me?”  and learn how to increase your visibility in social media! So the first response is why would they need to know my domain name?  So I wrote them as such. What they were really selling is SEO services, which also isn’t rocket science and something we have taught thousands of small to medium sized businesses 80% of what they need to know in less than an hour.  At the end of the day SEO is a numbers game and the way you play that numbers game is to create lots of valuable content on your own site. last_img read more

3 On-Page SEO Mistakes and Tips for Franchisees

first_img 1. Create an Optimized Page Title on-page search engine optimization (SEO) best practices . Failing to do so is a simple yet costly mistake that many websites make. Making this mistake, especially if most of your business comes from a local geographic radius, means you are instead competing for keywords that are much more difficult to rank for because of the increased competition around these more broad-based keywords. Originally published Aug 10, 2011 8:01:00 PM, updated October 20 2016 competing against other local businesses Each individual page of your website offers an opportunity for you to Many local franchisee websites fail to optimize their page titles around for your franchise. . Here are three on-page SEO tips for franchisees to help get found by more people looking for their products and services.  improving your on-page SEO What should franchisees do? As a franchisee, how does your website’s on-page SEO stack up? If you’re making any of these three mistakes, it might make sense to spend some more time 2. Optimize Your Page Titles Around Geographically Specific Keywords To see this in action, perform a Google search for “George Washington.” Notice that the first result that pops up is the Wikipedia page where the based on its authority from inbound links, which is another contributing factor that helps this page rank so well in search engines. If your page title reads “Home” or “X Company,” we suggest changing it to something that contains your top one or two keywords. For example, imagine that you own a leather furniture store in Jacksonville. The page title on the home page of your website should not be “Rick’s Furniture Store” unless that’s what you want to get found for. Rather, your page title should be something like “Leather Furniture Store Jacksonville | Leather Sofas Jacksonville” because those are likely keywords that searchers who have never heard of Rick’s Furniture Store will be typing into search engines. For example, a Google keyword search for “leather furniture” shows 18.8 million website pages in the Google index. A Google search for the keyword “leather furniture Jacksonville” instead has only has 299K website pages indexed in Google. This means there is a lot less competition, and therefore, it is a lot less difficult to rank organically for “leather furniture Jacksonville” compared to plain old “leather furniture.” In other words, instead of competing with everyone in the country who is vying for that general keyword, you are only Your page title or title tag is the most important piece of real estate on your website. Why? The page title is the first thing search engines read when crawling your site. Page titles are crucial because they tell search engines what you want to get found for. Many franchisee websites experience difficulty getting found by prospects in organic search because they haven’t optimized their page title with the What should franchisees do? On-page SEO . geographically-focused keywordscenter_img rank for a new keyword in search engines for specific keywords you want to target. Make sure you weave that keyword into as many on-page SEO ranking factors as you can without sacrificing readability for your site visitors. Take the time to Many franchisees either do not have a website or do not have access to their website to make geographically-focused SEO improvements. First, if you do not have a website for your locally owned and operated franchise, we recommend getting one set up ASAP! 3. Use Each Web Page as an Opportunity to Rank for a New Keyword most important on-page SEO elements Another common mistake is setting your company name as your page title. Making sure you are not making these two simple — yet powerful — mistakes will go a long way toward helping Second, it’s also important that your website has an easy-to-use CMS, or content management system. A CMS will allow you to easily update and edit your website when necessary instead of paying a webmaster $100 or more each time you need to make an update. Topics: appropriate keywords carefully search engine optimize each page on your website in your geographic area. . In fact, a common mistake many companies make is having a generic page title that reads “Home.” Having “Home” as your page title tells search engines that you want to get found each time a searcher types in “Home.” Not ideal. improve on-page SEO off-page SEO What should franchisees do? In the United States, the franchise industry accounts for almost 40% of all retail sales. Unfortunately, many franchise companies with large networks of franchisees spread throughout the country are not taking advantage of . Your search engine rankings will thank you. (page title, URL, H1 tag, alt text) are all optimized around the keyword “George Washington.” This is not an accident. One of the reasons Google has indexed this page as the most relevant and authoritative website on “George Washington” is because its on-page SEO structure is perfectly optimized. Wikipedia also has strong Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

101 Signs You’re an Inbound Marketer

first_imgWe inbound marketers need to stick together! Sure, we have our quirky obsessions with data, Excel, content creation, and lead generation. But hey, that’s what makes us so darn successful! Read this list, and see if you can relate. If you do, there’s a very good chance you’re an inbound marketer too!101 Signs You’re an Inbound Marketer1. You can calculate visitor-to-lead conversion rates in your sleep. (Tweet this!)2. You dream about Excel. (Tweet this!)3. You could have a full conversation in acronyms, including CRM, CTR, SEO, and CTA. (Tweet this!)4. You keep in touch with your mom using a lead nurturing campaign. (Tweet this!)5. Your salespeople go from asking for more leads to asking for more high quality leads. (Tweet this!)6. You don’t know whether to laugh or cry when you encounter a website that is built in FLASH. (Tweet this!)7. You’re the mayor of your office (on Foursquare). (Tweet this!)8. Your dog/cat/bird/hamster is named Godin/Kawasaki/Brogan/Scott. (Tweet this!)9. Your friends who don’t ‘get’ inbound marketing think you “do social media” for a living. (Tweet this!)10. You ward off outbound marketing ghosts and spirits with The New Rules of Marketing and PR. (Tweet this!)11. You click “send” on a marketing email, and then obsessively check how many leads came from that send every five minutes. (Tweet this!)12. Your funnel is so fat, you have to do lead scoring to help your sales team prioritize their time. (Tweet this!)13. You measure everything. Twice. (Tweet this!)14. After seeing a couple of data points, you feel an immediate itch to create an infographic. (Tweet this!)15. You know all about cookie tracking (and it has nothing to do with your two-year-old). (Tweet this!)16. You know exactly how many visitors, leads, and customers you got from Facebook … yesterday. (Tweet this!)17. Your CEO asks you how you can invest more in marketing, instead of asking you to cut the budget. (Tweet this!)18. You brainstorm blog post ideas in the shower. (Tweet this!)19. Even your personal Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn accounts include calls-to-action. (Tweet this!)20. The funnel is your favorite shape. (Tweet this!)21. You tell salespeople who cold call you that they should learn about inbound marketing. (Tweet this!)22. You “like” everything. (Tweet this!)23. You send out daily emails to your team with graphs and charts. (Tweet this!)24. NoFollow tags make you cry. (Tweet this!)25. Your sales team loves you. (Tweet this!)26. When Twitter goes down, you feel lost. (Tweet this!)27. To you, “going viral” is a good thing and has nothing to do with zombies. (Tweet this!)28. You constantly publish blog posts titled, “X Ways to do Y.” (Tweet this!)29. You don’t actually like the Grateful Dead’s music, but you think their marketing rocks! (Tweet this!)30. Your email is your to-do list. (Tweet this!)31. You write blog posts on the fly on your smartphone while traveling. (Tweet this!)32. You follow more internet marketing celebrities on Twitter than mainstream pop celebrities. (Tweet this!)33. You use tools to streamline as much of your marketing as possible. (Tweet this!)34. You have a favorite URL shortener. (Tweet this!)35. You respond to every request for event sponsorship with … “Well, what if we wrote a guest blog instead?” (Tweet this!)36. You understand 302 redirects are evil. (Tweet this!)37. You know the ROI of social media. (Tweet this!)38. You know search engines can’t be gamed, but gosh darn it — you still try! (Tweet this!)39. Your Facebook feed is more about work than friends. (Tweet this!)40. Sometimes #YouThinkInHashtags (Tweet this!) 41. Salesforce integration with everything is a necessity. (Tweet this!)42. You have multiple monitors to monitor Twitter and Facebook as you work. (Tweet this!)43. You obsess about the number of business days in a calendar month. (Tweet this!)44. You’re a little bit embarrassed to even *suggest* increasing your paid search or display ad budget. (Tweet this!) 45. Your emotional attachment to “traffic” is strong enough to make you jump in your car and seek gridlock. (Tweet this!) 46. You create badges for everything. And you compete for them. (Tweet this!) 47. You know what a persona is, and you create content that appeals to that persona. (Tweet this!) 48. You always know the event hashtag, and you livetweet from conferences. (Tweet this!)49. You can type on your smartphone as fast as you can on your computer. (Tweet this!)50. You take your follower count very seriously. (Tweet this!) 51. To you, link love is more romantic than flowers and candy. (Tweet this!)52. You have your Twitter username on your business cards. (Tweet this!)53. You know what your prospects’ buying cycle looks like. (Tweet this!)54. You obsess about creating content that appeals to prospects at all stages of their sales cycle. (Tweet this!)55. You know ‘content marketing’ and ‘social media marketing’ are tips of the inbound marketing iceberg! (Tweet this!) 56. You have no shame asking for an inbound link when someone mentions your company in a blog article. (Tweet this!)57. You fight against killing kittens by not sending spam emails. (Tweet this!) 58. Your CEO asks you how you lowered cost-per-lead quarter over quarter. (Tweet this!)59. You roll your eyes when salespeople tell you they have to attend another trade show. (Tweet this!) 60. Your executives understand the importance of blogging, and they make time to do it. (Tweet this!) 61. Your company has more “fans” than Justin Bieber. (Tweet this!)62. You segment your leads via lead source, company size, and hair color. (Tweet this!)63. You watch YouTube for inspiration. (You swear it’s for inspiration!) (Tweet this!)64. You’ve trained your sales team to use lead intelligence to time their sales calls better. (Tweet this!)65. Whenever someone asks you a data question, you tell them to build a pivot table. (Tweet this!)66. Your Website Grade is greater than an 85. (Tweet this!)67. You have a Salesforce dashboard to monitor all your Salesforce dashboards. (Tweet this!)68. You know what a marketing SLA is. (Tweet this!) 69. At every event, you take photos, videos, and write a wrap-up blog post. (Tweet this!)70. Your emails to colleagues use bolded phrases, headers bullets, and optimized subject lines. (Tweet this!)71. You keep up with what your friends are doing via their blogs. (Tweet this!) 72. In casual conversation you’ve said, “That would make a great ebook,” or “I’m doing a webinar on that.” (Tweet this!)73. You Google yourself every day to make sure nothing embarrassing is suddenly ranking for your name. (Tweet this!)74. You can speak in 140 characters. (Tweet this!)75. Your blogging software knows which keywords to fight to the death for, and how hard it will be to rank. (Tweet this!)76. You test EVERYTHING, including layout, button color, subject line, and sender name. EVERYTHING. (Tweet this!)77. You love reading blog post lists, which is why you’ve read this far. (Tweet this!) 78. You believe that traffic is a useless measure unless you can see how much of it converts into leads. (Tweet this!)79. You can multitask tweeting, blogging, reporting, and emailing all at once. (Tweet this!)80. You run three different browsers to manage all of your Google accounts. (Tweet this!)81. You’ve been known to save bad marketing automation emails, forward them to friends, and laugh at them. (Tweet this!) 82. Your best friend’s idea of a practical joke is to start a website to make fun of you. (Tweet this!)83. You require flexibility to change your landing pages and website content whenever you want. (Tweet this!) 84. You actually KNOW which pages on your website signal the greatest likelihood to buy. (Tweet this!)85. You’ve empowered your non-marketing colleagues and customers to evangelize your company on your behalf. (Tweet this!) 86. You take Twitpics wherever you go. (Tweet this!) 87. You have to force yourself to leave work at the end of the day. (Just one more minute! This post is almost perfect!) (Tweet this!)88. Your favorite night out is a networking event. (Tweet this!) 89. You own an iPhone/iPod, MacBook, AND an iPad. (Tweet this!) 90. Email marketing is your best friend and your worst nightmare, all at the same time. (Tweet this!)91. You’re the star contributor to every LinkedIn group you’re a part of. (Tweet this!)92. Long-tail keywords are your best friend. (Tweet this!)93. All the SWAG you give out has QR codes on it. (Tweet this!) 94. Your family has a Google+ Circle, and you plan to use Google Hangout to celebrate Thanksgiving this year. (Tweet this!)95. You celebrate your Twitter anniversaries. (Tweet this!)96. You have more landing pages than products. (Tweet this!)97. Your bookshelf has all 3 versions of The New Rules of Marketing and PR, bookended by Inbound Marketing. (Tweet this!)98. You regularly have more browser tabs open than a developer or engineer. (Tweet this!)99. You’ve taken every FAQ out of your email archives and turned it into a blog post. (Tweet this!)100. You brainstorm secondary conversion offers at lunch. (Tweet this!)101. Your business is growing in a downturned economy. (Tweet this!)What are the signs telling you? Are you an inbound marketer? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: Social Media Marketers Originally published Oct 27, 2011 9:00:00 AM, updated October 20 2016last_img read more

LinkedIn 277% More Effective for Lead Generation Than Facebook & Twitter [New Data]

first_imgSocial media can be a huge contributor to a company’s lead generation efforts in both B2B and B2C. But how efficient are the various different social channels in directly driving leads? In a recent study of over 5,000 businesses, HubSpot found that traffic from LinkedIn generated the highest visitor-to-lead conversion rate at 2.74%, almost 3 times higher (277%) than both Twitter (.69%) and Facebook (.77%).Access Now: Free Advertising Checklist + Best Practices Videos LinkedIn’s conversion rate also outranked social media as a channel overall. In other words, of all the traffic that came to these business’ websites via social media, .98% of that traffic converted into leads, compared to LinkedIn’s 2.74%.So why might LinkedIn be the most efficient social channel for lead generation, and how can you use that to your advantage?People join LinkedIn to showcase their career, work expertise, and find content and information to make their professional lives better. So businesses who target other businesses will naturally find a higher concentration of their target market on LinkedIn. Also, when someone visits LinkedIn, the person is most likely in a business-focused mindset, helping business’ content perform inherently better.So what about B2C-focused businesses? Less content is generally posted to LinkedIn than to other social networks, which is probably because people almost exclusively post marketing-related content as opposed to their children’s photos or social “chatter.” This means there is less clutter on LinkedIn, making a person capable of consuming a higher percentage of the content that’s active on LinkedIn at any given time. In other words, a business’ marketing posts are more likely to be noticed on LinkedIn than somewhere else.So what should you do when you find a specific social channel that’s a slam dunk for your business?How to Leverage Your Business’ Top-Performing Social Network1. Invest time and effort to grow that specific channel. The trick, however, will be trying to maintain a quality network as your community scales.2. Post more of the targeted content that’s working. If you notice people are specifically really enjoying blog posts, webinars, or something else — keep offering it! How can you tell what content’s working? Monitor comments, likes, shares, and clicks.3. Find more opportunities to post relevant CTAs. Can you sprinkle more lead generation opportunities throughout your social media updates? It’s quite a balancing act, but a solid mix of calls-to-action (CTAs) and other content is healthy.4. Don’t take success for granted – keep learning. It’s easy to get comfortable when something is going well. Remember, there are always opportunities to improve. Keep testing, analyzing your data, and increasing results!What type of conversion rates do you experience per network? Is the data similar to your own results? Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics:center_img Originally published Jan 30, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated October 14 2019 LinkedIn Marketinglast_img read more

How to Breathe Life Into a Boring Email Newsletter

first_imgIf you’ve ever been on the receiving end of an email newsletter, you’ve likely been more bored than that shamelessly cute baby to the right. I get it — when you’re not sure what to write, but you feel like an email has to go out, why not send an update about products, services, and what’s going on at your company?Unfortunately, the result is often a whole lot of generic, irrelevant content sent to a poorly segmented list — and that results in low open/click-through rates and lots of unsubscribes. That means best case scenario, your reputation is dinged in your subscribers’ eyes; worst case scenario, your reputation is dinged by Return Path and future email deliverability is negatively impacted.But there are awesome email newsletters out there. So what separates the triumphs from the tragedies? And how do you ensure your email newsletter is successful? This blog post will break down why email newsletters fail, and how you can ensure your recipients love every newsletter you send! Why Email Newsletters Often Fail, and How to Make Yours Succeed First, let’s define what an email newsletter is, and what it isn’t. An email newsletter is an email from a business that communicates announcements about products, services, industry, or general company information. It includes a mix of content, like event reminders, surveys, educational information about your product, service, or industry, and promotions and other offers.An email newsletter is not a dedicated promotional email that contains information about just one offer; a digest that simply summarizes a roundup of content you’ve published; a lead nurturing email (though a side effect certainly may be a better nurtured lead); or a transactional email that provides order information or prompts a shopper to complete a purchase. These other types of emails are important parts of your email marketing strategy, and you can learn more about them in this blog post .Now that we’re all on the same page, let’s examine why email newsletters often fail, and what you can do to prevent said failure. Poorly Segmented List As with any email marketing, the content in your email newsletter should be relevant to your audience. And that doesn’t happen without list segmentation. The problem is, often email newsletters are sent as the catch-all content — it’s so generic, it can apply to everybody on your email list!Or no one at all … because as we’ll discuss in more detail in the next section of this post, generic content doesn’t get you far. Your email newsletter should only go out to those recipients who are interested in the subject matter of the newsletter. I can tell you right now that there are people on HubSpot’s own email list that don’t give a whit (not a typo) about marketing automation, but are extremely interested in how to get leads from social media; and vice versa. If my newsletter focuses on the latest social media developments — is it wise to send that newsletter to subscribers who wanted to hear about marketing automation software? I think not.There are two ways to remedy this. The first is to marry the interests of both list segments and write a newsletter about, say, social media marketing automation . The more list segments you have, however, the more difficult it will become to create newsletter content that applies to everyone. If you’re facing this problem, the better solution is to tailor content to each list segment. This means either segmenting lists yourself and creating newsletter content that is relevant to that list segment, or letting recipients opt in to newsletters about a specific subject matter.Finally, whenever you create a call-to-action on your website for a visitor to sign up for your email newsletter, be as clear as possible about the content of that newsletter. Setting these expectations up front will help you capture those who truly want the content your newsletter will cover, and filter out those who will ultimately be disappointed with the content of your email.When properly segmented, email newsletters have one of the highest click-through rates (CTRs) of all email types — far exceeding promotional or transactional messages. This is the first step you should take on your way to creating a successful email newsletter. Information Overload Email newsletters often suffer from a few types of information overload: either the breadth of information covered is too wide, the quantity of information is too overwhelming for any reader to actually consume, and/or the information is just plain not interesting. Let’s break down how to avoid each of these problems.We’ll begin with the issue of covering too wide a breadth of information, which we touched on in the first section of this post. If you send an email about too many subjects, it’s too unfocused to be relevant to anyone. Let’s play a game of “one of these things is not like the other” to demonstrate the concept further. You run email marketing for a clown college, and for your next email newsletter, you want to touch on the following topics:Clown financial aid application deadlineClown work study programsClown intramural sports leaguesStudent loan options for clownsWhat would you leave out? The information about sports leagues, right? It’s not that some of your prospective and current clown students aren’t interested in sports clubs at the school, it’s just that not all of them will be — and doesn’t it make sense to talk about what that entire list segment does care about (paying for school) and save the sports talk for another list segment that does care about extracurriculars?Just as you should provide your readers a focused subject matter in your emails, you should help them maintain that focus by limiting the amount of text in the email. Often email newsletters try to write an entire article about their subject matter — but is an email really the place to detail what options clowns have for student loans? If it requires more than a couple sentences of explanation, a web page is the more appropriate venue. Write a brief description of the content in your email newsletter, then include a link to read more on your website so your reader isn’t overwhelmed with text in the email. Not only is this easier to consume, but it also drives visitors to your website, provides opportunities for reconversion, and gets you more indexable pages filled with great content to improve your SEO !Finally, newsletters often suffer from talking about information that no one cares about, which usually takes the form of self-promotional content. It’s not that you shouldn’t talk about your product, service, or company — that’s part of the definition of an email newsletter. But there’s a way to present that information that demonstrates value for the reader, instead of appearing like a relatively meaningless press release or announcement. Ask yourself the “so what?” of any announcement you’re making. For example, why does it matter to the reader that you’re launching a new product? Will it make them better at their jobs? If so, how? Announce the feature, and then explain the end benefit of that feature for your reader. If you can’t think of an end benefit, nix the content from your newsletter. Competing Calls-to-Action In most email marketing, with every new call-to-action you include, the effectiveness of each is diluted more and more. So in an email newsletter with so many different pieces of content contained therein — surveys, deadlines, offers, product launches, etc. — it’s easy to break one of the cardinal rules of email marketing: including only one call-to-action!So how do you get past this? The first step is acceptance — there will be more than one call-to-action in your email newsletter. But that doesn’t mean they have to compete with one another. Take a step back, and ask yourself what you want your recipients to do when they read your newsletter. What’s the point?Let’s revisit our clown financial aid example. Perhaps the email marketing manager decided the point of the newsletter is to show prospective students the options they have at their disposal to pay for school — financial aid, work study, and student loans. These may all point to different pages on the website when the reader clicks through on the story, but the call-to-action on each of those pages could point to one all-inclusive guide about paying for clown college. The end goal is the same: getting clowns to pay for school. Each of those pieces of content, the pages a reader lands on when they click through, and the calls-to-action available to them on those pages all contribute to that goal.You can also use design to emphasize one particular story over others. For example, if the financial aid deadline is the most important part of the newsletter, it should act as a feature story and take up more room in the newsletter than the rest of the stories. In fact, let’s look at how else design can make or break your email newsletter. Inconsistent Design and Layout Because email newsletters are a compilation of stories, many businesses change the appearance of the emails from send to send to accommodate the ever-changing content. It makes sense — images could be different sizes from week to week, there might be an uneven balance of content, or you can’t decide which content should be prioritized. But instead of making the difficult choices, marketers often just adapt their newsletter design to accommodate that send’s specific needs.Don’t do it! Not only does it take lots of time to edit your email template, but it confuses your regular readers. Use a standard format for every single newsletter so it is recognizable to your subscribers. That means the same layout, the same image alignment, and the same placement of links and calls-to-action so your reader can scan and find the information they want. For example, I get a weekly email from Urban Daddy called “The Weekender” that summarizes events going on around Boston that I might be interested in. Take a look.Notice how the format for each story follows the same structure, as does the overall email. First, I know I can scan the email for big, bold days; so if I want an activity for Saturday, I can scroll down to that day. And if I find one heading or picture that interests me, I know I can read a short blurb of copy, and find more information via the link in the story’s footer — along with date, time, location, and contact information. Following this consistency for every email means when I see it in my inbox, I know it won’t require a lot of my time to scan and consume the information I want. Vague Subject Lines This is an easy fix, but such a common email newsletter faux pas. Often, the subject of an email newsletter is something along the lines of Weekly [Company X] Newsletter or Monthly [Product Y] Update . What does this mean? What will the reader learn? The interesting part of the email isn’t the frequency at which the recipient receives it — it’s the juicy information you’re divulging!Let’s continue to work off the Urban Daddy example above. The subject line of that email is: UD | Waffles, $1 Oysters, and… Iceland They don’t mention that this is the weekly digest I receive — I already know that’s what Urban Daddy sends me! Instead, they mention some of the best offers around Boston this weekend that prompt me to open the email. Just as you must demonstrate the “so what” within the email copy, so must you explain the value of the email with a descriptive and enticing subject line .Email newsletters have the opportunity to be chock full of interesting content, and as such are a very useful inbound marketing tool. So it’s a shame when marketers put significant time and effort into compiling and sharing their best announcements, offers, and content in an email newsletter, only to have it fall on deaf ears. Use these tips to ensure your next email newsletter is a smashing success and leads to an ever-increasing, dedicated list of subscribers that look forward to reading your email content. What components of email newsletters do you find valuable? Share your recommendations in the comments! Image Credit: Big yawn Topics: Originally published Mar 29, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Email Newsletters Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlacklast_img read more

Who Should ‘Own’ Social Media at Your Company?

first_img Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Topics: It’s a common debate in many businesses. Just who should be responsible for managing my company’s social media presence? Sales? Marketing? Customer Service?Do you want our perspective? How about all of the above? For most companies, social media management is a function of the marketing department, but there is a slew of social applications for your customer service and sales teams, too. Wouldn’t your sales team like to know if their assigned leads were asking questions about your products on Twitter? And aren’t customers constantly flocking to social media to complain about or seek help with products and services? In fact, according to a study from Booz & Company, 75% of marketers using social media identify customer service as a primary use of their social media platform. That being said, only 26% of respondents in the same study describe customer service as a department responsible for contributing leadership to social media strategies.Let’s be honest. The old adage, “too many cooks …” needn’t apply to social media management. Marketing, Customer Service, and Sales can all have a hand in your business’ social presence, and it doesn’t have to be a headache. You just have to know how to organize it. So let’s discuss how you can create a social media management function that everyone can take part in — and profit from.Identify Your Contributors Let’s be clear: just because you shouldn’t limit social media management to only one department, doesn’t mean you should have a million hands in your accounts. As I emphasized a few sentences ago, you have to know how to organize it, and part of this organization involves designating a few key players. So before you move on, identify who these key players are from each department. Ideally, you’d have one or a few people (depending on the size of your organization) from each department who are responsible for helping to manage your company’s social presence.You should also assign one or two point people from one department to manage your company’s overall presence. Because the marketing function of social media requires a lot of content creation/sharing and frequent updating of social accounts, you’ll probably want your marketing department to ultimately drive your company’s social presence. These social media managers will oversee the day-to-day operation of your social media accounts, as well as implement and carry out any social media marketing promotions. Essentially, these people will field and ‘outsource’ any sales or customer service/support-related queries that pop up in social media to the designated sales and customer service contributors.Choose the Right ToolsFor social media collaboration to work smoothly, you’ll also need to implement the right tools. Otherwise, the “too many cooks …” adage will start to apply. Luckily, there are plenty of tools available that enable you to manage social media collaboration among multiple contributors. When you’re evaluating social media management tools, you’ll want to look for tools that give you the ability to do the following:Schedule updates for the futureSet up filters to monitor your business and keywordsMonitor multiple social networksSupport multiple collaborators Assign specific social media updates to your collaborators for follow-upBONUS: hooks up to your marketing software for closed-loop social integrationHootSuite, for example, is a third-party social media management tool that enables you to do all of the above. It even now integrates with HubSpot’s marketing software to give customers the ability to monitor their leads’ activities in social media, and better use social media for lead nurturing — a huge win for Marketing and Sales.Now let’s dive into each of your social media contributors and the roles they should play in social media management.Marketing’s InvolvementAs we mentioned, your marketing department is likely to have the most proactive social media involvement, as marketing’s main use-cases for social media are promoting marketing content and offers, and engaging fans and followers. Be sure your marketing point person is sufficiently balancing updates about offers, educational content, and content that engages (e.g. questions, visual content, etc.).It’s also Marketing’s job to work with other teams’ contributors to be sure everyone has the opportunity to share the messages and updates that are important to those teams. For example, the customer team might want to share news of an upcoming webinar specifically meant for customers or announce the launch of a new customer-only email newsletter that customers can opt into receiving. To make this more efficient, have your point people create a sort of social media editorial calendar for the social networks you’re participating in. Fill it with the marketing content and offers you plan to promote, leave some open spots for other team’s messages, and give them access to the calendar so they can add their desired updates. To make this seamless, set a deadline each week for when submissions need to be made, and then schedule the content on a week by week basis.  And as the point person/people for your company’s social media engagement, your social media manager(s) will also be responsible for monitoring mentions of your company, products/services, and industry terms. Make sure your point person routes questions to the appropriate social media collaborators in Customer Service and Sales as they arise. If you’re using HubSpot’s HootSuite integration, for example, and the point person notices that a lead in the HubSpot Contacts stream is asking a question about your product pricing, you might assign that update to your sales team collaborator who can either follow up directly or loop in that lead’s assigned rep.Customer Service’s InvolvementAccording to eMarketer, 46% of customers want to solve a problem when they’re engaging with a brand on social media, and 39% are looking to give feedback about a product or service. No wonder it makes total sense for customer service to have significant involvement in your business’ social media presence. That being said, using social media for customer service communication doesn’t go without its challenges. In fact, we’ve highlighted 7 of these such challenges and how businesses are tackling them in this past blog post. And while there are certainly challenges, that shouldn’t deter your customer service team from getting involved. After all, who is better trained and capable of handling a disgruntled customer or answering a nitty gritty product question — your marketing team, or a customer service rep? Do we even need to answer?Any customer service reps who are collaborating with your social presence should be at the ready to answer questions or respond to customers that your marketing point people can’t appropriately handle on their own. Whether your customer service team is using the same social media accounts, replying via a dedicated “Help” account, or contacting the customer through another method such as email (all are acceptable options, depending on your business), the customer service social collaborator should be following up in a timely manner and providing the most helpful assistance manageable. Furthermore, these contributors should be collaborating with the point person to communicate important customer-related updates that pop up unexpectedly, such as software outages or maintenance.Sales’ InvolvementLet’s not forget about Sales, folks. Your sales team is chatting it up with potential customers all the time, and knowing how to use social media to help them be more effective in the sales process can be a very valuable sales tool. And besides just responding to social media assignments from your marketing point people, your sales team should proactively be using social media to prospect as well as prepare for sales calls, follow ups, and nurture their assigned leads.If social media participation is new to your sales team, train them! Teach them how to locate their leads in social media to conduct some research in preparation for sales calls. Some marketing software, like HubSpot, may even show your sales team their lead’s social media account information, if available. Does the lead have accounts on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, or another social network or community popular for your industry? Once the sales rep has identified them, have them scan the lead’s information and updates on these social media sites. Encourage them to learn about the lead’s interests and pain points and strategize about how they can leverage these insights on their sales calls. After they’ve been in touch, Sales can even use social media as another way to keep in touch with and nurture their prospects by sending leads links to helpful content and looking for opportunities to answer their questions so they stay top of mind.What other social media collaboration tips would you share? Should other departments be involved in social media management? If so, who? Originally published Jun 19, 2012 9:00:00 AM, updated February 01 2017 Social Media Marketerslast_img read more