Avengers Endgame will mark Stan Lees last Marvel movie cameo

first_img 0 Captain Marvel Stan Lee Marvel Spiderman Thor The Avengers Every Stan Lee Marvel movie cameo Stan Lee plays a hilarious intergalactic barber in the 2017 movie Thor: Ragnarok. Marvel Whenever a new Marvel movie came out, fans had fun trying to spot Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee on the big screen. Lee guest-starred in over 20 Marvel movies — as well as in various TV shows, video games and comics. Lee has appeared as everything from a bus driver to a librarian alongside the comic book characters he created over the years.But since Lee’s death at age 95 in 2018, it’s been unclear how many more posthumous cameos would be granted to the late, great comic book creator, until now. “It’s his last one committed to film,” Avengers: Endgame director Joe Russo told the media on press day in Los Angeles Saturday.  Most recently, Lee had a touching posthumous cameo in Captain Marvel reading a script of director Kevin Smith’s 1995 movie Mallrats, which Lee starred in as himself.Some fans speculated that the upcoming Spider-Man: Far From Home, which hits theaters in July, would feature Lee’s final cameo, especially since Russo told the press earlier this month that “I don’t remember if he was well enough to do the cameo in Homecoming or not.”  Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment Originally published 2:36 p.m. PT.  Stan Lee dies at 95: A look back at his most iconic characters on screen Tags Lee’s Captain Marvel cameo made Kevin Smith a ‘blubbering mess’ Star-studded tribute to Lee: He ‘made us proud to be misfits’ Lee’s Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse cameo will warm your heart 4:51 More Stan Lee 18 Photos Share your voice TV and Movies While it’s bittersweet to learn that Lee’s last hurrah in the MCU is coming up fast, the the extra-long run time for the upcoming Avengers: Endgame movie could mean that Marvel might give Lee more than one appearance in the three-hour movie. “I have to say, I think it’s astonishing that this would be his last cameo,” Russo added. “It’s just kind of mind-boggling that he made it to the end of this run. I can’t believe it.”tec0280-cmp-v006-1037Stan Lee is dressed as an astronaut in the 2017 movie Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Marvel After all, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 allowed for not one but two moments in the film where Lee — dressed as an astronaut — is seen discussing his past adventures with various interested aliens referred to as the Watchers.  Avengers: Endgame is scheduled to open in theaters worldwide on April 26. For more Avengers: Endgame plot theories, characters reveals and news check out our Avengers: Endgame movie guide. If you want to catch every Lee cameo in the MCU movies before the Endgame begins, here’s our guide to streaming all the movies online.last_img read more

President Trump wants social media to catch shooters before they strike Its

first_img reading • President Trump wants social media to catch shooters before they strike. It’s going to be hard Aug 6 • Trump says he’s watching Google ‘very closely,’ slams CEO Sundar Pichai President Donald Trump delivered remarks on the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas, and Dayton, Ohio Monday. Getty Images Some of the most horrific mass shootings have followed a chillingly similar script: Angry white men, driven to extremism in online forums like 8chan and Gab, post manifestos railing against minorities. When they begin to shoot, members of the message boards post responses that encourage them to kill more.President Donald Trump says it needs to stop.In a speech after two shootings left at least 31 people dead, Trump called on social media companies to identify mass shooters before they open fire.”I am directing the Department of Justice to work in partnership with local state and federal agencies, as well as social media companies, to develop tools that can detect mass shooters before they strike,” he said.In theory, predictive policing online should be possible. Twitter, Facebook and YouTube have increasingly harnessed artificial intelligence and other technology to identify and act on bad behavior as they sift through billions of posts. They’ve been able to pull down terrorist propaganda from ISIS, for example, and they have programs that can often identify child pornorgraphy automatically.22 Dead And 26 Injured In Mass Shooting At Shopping Center In El PasoPeople gather near white handmade crosses memorializing the victims of a mass shooting which left at least 22 people dead in El Paso, Texas. Getty Images The challenge, experts say, is that correctly identifying these lone wolves is tougher than finding overt terrorist propaganda. One reason, for example, is it’s hard to determine when a post may be preparation for a terrorist act, or merely someone spouting off.Another problem is that message boards have changed the way extremists recruit to their causes. Many of these attackers know each other only online. Some may not interact directly.”In the past, there would be a more terrestrial component to how hate groups would organize and recruit,” said Brian Levin, who runs the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, San Bernardino. That means they’d meet somewhere in the real world to chat or exchange propaganda.Manifestos online have taken the place of those real world connections. Manifestos reference other manifestos, effectively writing a new chapter in an expanding meta-book of hate. The writers almost always post anonymously. They rarely post overt threats because those would break the rules of most social media sites, which could get them kicked off and deprive them of a platform.”The issue is can we get to these folks who while stealth, are delivering clues, oftentimes the last of which is right before their attack,” Levin added.Not always rightOf course, Facebook and Twitter have taken action, primarily against propaganda supporting ISIS and Al-Qaeda. The social media companies have occasionally identified takedowns of white supremacist material, but haven’t provided macro data on the topic.Twitter says it suspended 166,513 unique accounts for promoting terrorism during the second half of 2018. The company credited its internal tools for flagging 91% of the accounts.”In the majority of cases, we take action at the account setup stage — before the account even Tweets,” Twitter said earlier this year.Meanwhile, Facebook said it found more than 99% of ISIS and Al-Qaeda content before it was reported by the community in the six months between April and September 2018.But experts say propaganda that lionizes terrorists is easier to identify as dangerous than an angry person spouting off about politics. And reading motive into hyperbolic tweets raises knotty questions about free speech. We can’t get to actual solutions if we keep blaming the virtual world. Brittan Heller, a fellow at Harvard’s Carr Center for Human Rights Politics Tech Industry Digital Media 33 Share your voice Tags Aug 7 • Trump’s emissions and fuel economy rollbacks will cost Americans money, study says US Tech Policy See All • Comments Jul 28 • Apple’s Q3 earnings are all about the iPhone 11 hints “When we look at what predictive policing looks like, it always results in over-policing, arrests and prosecution of communities of color,” said Brittan Heller, a fellow at Harvard’s Carr Center for Human Rights, who previously worked for the Anti-Defamation League, the US Department of Justice, and International Criminal Court. “Whenever I hear people trying to predict criminality, as a former prosecutor, it makes the hair on the back of my neck stand up,” she said.Aside from the potentially thorny civil rights issues, the technology at Facebook, Twitter and YouTube is far from perfect. Their automated computer programs have screwed up plenty of times.When Facebook put a computer in charge of selecting trending topics, it began sharing hoaxes and conspiracy theories instead of actual news stories. After a shooter killed 17 people at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, the top trending video on YouTube accused David Hogg, a survivor, of being a “crisis actor.”AI may eventually get better at understanding hate-riddled posts. But Heller says Trump and other politicians need to look beyond technology for an answer to this growing domestic threat.”It’s less a question about the internet, and it’s more a question about gun-based violence,” Heller said. “We can’t get to actual solutions if we keep blaming the virtual world.”CNET’s Queenie Wong contributed to this report. US Tech Policylast_img read more

Texas Man With 3DPrinted Gun And Hit List Of Lawmakers Sentenced To

first_img Share Eric Gay/APA 3D-printed gun called the Liberator. A man was sentenced to eight years in prison Wednesday for violating a court order after he printed his own 3D gun.Eric Gerard McGinnis was not supposed to have a gun. After a violent altercation with his girlfriend, a Texas judge barred him in 2015 from possessing a firearm. A year later, McGinnis tried to buy a gun anyway, but the purchase wouldn’t go through after a background check revealed the court order.So, according to the U.S. Attorney’s Office, McGinnis obtained a barrel, stock, upper receiver and grip — and then used a 3D printer to create the gun’s firing mechanism. He assembled the parts into a short-barrel AR-15 style rifle, and headed out into the woods with what federal attorneys called a “hit list” of Democratic and Republican lawmakers, including their office and home addresses. The list was titled, “9/11/2001 list of American Terrorists.”McGinnis was arrested in 2017 after officers heard three shots in the woods. On Wednesday he was sentenced to eight years in prison.“When he realized he couldn’t legally purchase a firearm, Eric McGinnis circumvented our gun laws by 3D-printing his weapon, eliminating the need for a background check,” said Erin Nealy Cox, U.S. Attorney for the Northern District of Texas.While McGinnis was being sentenced in Texas, Democrats in the House of Representatives were attempting to make good on their promise to tighten gun laws. The Judiciary Committee on Wednesday approved two bills expanding background checks for gun purchases. Those laws would require checks even at gun shows or in private sales. According to Politico, the legislation “stands virtually no chance in the Senate,” which is controlled by Republicans.McGinnis’ attempt to legally purchase a firearm was stymied by the National Instant Criminal Background Check System. But legislation proposed yesterday in the Senate deals directly with 3D printable guns. A group of Democrats proposed a law that would maintain current laws against publishing 3D printed gun information over the internet.The Senate Democrats criticized President Trump’s proposal to transfer oversight of 3D guns to the Commerce Department, arguing that would make it easier for people to get access to blueprints.“The Trump administration basically gave anyone – including criminals and murderers – a green light to 3D print and sell untraceable ‘ghost guns,’” said Sen. Chris Murphy, D-Conn, according to The Washington Examiner. “Thankfully, the courts have blocked this for now, but Congress needs to act to close this glaring loophole before anyone gets killed.”It’s not just Congress that is considering gun legislation. In New Hampshire on Wednesday, state lawmakers considered multiple bills that would expand background checks to close the so-called “gun show loophole”; impose a seven-day waiting period for most firearm sales; and prohibit possession of firearms at school zones throughout the state.In Nevada, the state senate also approved a bill designed to close the gun show loophole. According to the Reno Gazette Journal, all eight members of the Republican minority party opposed the bill, arguing the law was a “feel-good” measure being passed for political reasons.Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

Turner Shuts Down Super Deluxe Citing Duplication With Other WarnerMedia Units

first_imgAT&T’s pruning of WarnerMedia continues: Turner announced that it is killing off Super Deluxe, its edgy digital and TV studio.“Turner is proud of the unique brand Super Deluxe has built over the past three years, and the cutting-edge content and innovations this incredible group of very talented people has made,” the cable programmer said in a statement. “However, there are now massive changes in the social and mobile-first ecosystem and duplication with other business units in our new WarnerMedia portfolio. Super Deluxe found inspiring ways of connecting with a new generation and many of their best practices will be adopted by other Turner properties as we redirect this investment back into our portfolio.”Turner revived Super Deluxe in 2015, bringing back the short-form comedy brand that in its earlier incarnation lasted for about 18 months in the late 2000s. L.A.-based Super Deluxe was set up as an independent unit within Turner, which hired former CBS Films co-president Wolfgang Hammer as president. With Super Deluxe winding down, Hammer will depart the company. Super Deluxe currently has 54 full-time employees. According to a source, there will be layoffs but the scope hasn’t been determined yet. Staffers will be encouraged to apply for open positions in other Turner divisions; those who don’t find a placement will receive severance.“Super Deluxe is the future of entertainment for creative youth,” the studio says on its website. It claimed to reach 52 million monthly consumers 18-34, with an average of 165 million monthly views across Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and Instagram.Super Deluxe was overseen by Kevin Reilly, chief creative officer for Turner Entertainment and president of TBS and TNT. In describing Super Deluxe in 2016, Reilly said, “Our belief in the value proposition of ‘premium plus personalization’ now extends into the emergent ecosystem of mobile-centric consumers and next-generation creators thriving in that space.”The Super Deluxe team produced a steady stream of short-form irreverent and weird comedy segments, while it also had pursued a strategy of developing longer-form TV shows.Among those is Netflix’s “Chambers,” a supernatural drama starring Uma Thurman executive produced by Stephen Gaghan (“Traffic”), currently in production in the Albuquerque, N.M., area. Super Deluxe will continue its production commitment on “Chambers.” The studio also produced “This Close” for SundanceNow, billed as first show written, produced, and created by deaf people.In addition, Super Deluxe has set a Nov. 2 release for “The Passage,” a modern-day silent movie starring theatrical clown Philip Burgers, on iTunes and Turner’s FilmStruck SVOD service. “The Passage,” which Super Deluxe has positioned as an Oscar contender, may also be released on TBS’s digital channels. The studio’s projects in development included “Silver Foxes,” a gay senior-citizen sitcom from writers on “The Golden Girls” and other shows. In another move evidently related to AT&T’s restructuring of WarnerMedia operations, on Oct. 16 Warner Bros. abruptly shut down DramaFever, the Korean drama and Asian programming streaming service, citing changes in the market dynamics for K-drama. WB had acquired DramaFever, founded in 2009, almost three years ago.AT&T closed the Time Warner deal in June, renaming it WarnerMedia and putting telecom exec John Stankey in charge as CEO.After AT&T first announced its bid for Time Warner in October 2016, Turner and Super Deluxe execs were optimistic about lobbying the telco to invest more into the digital studio — given that its content was ideally suited for a new generation of consumers for whom the smartphone is the “first screen.” Obviously, that didn’t pan out. ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15 Popular on Variety last_img read more