Valeria Salazar guides Syracuse to 6-1 win against Cornell in return from respite

first_imgValeria Salazar stepped up a couple of feet on the court. She dug her feet in, ready for her opponent’s return. The ball came and, as it seemed to be headed toward her partner, Anna Shkudun, Salazar stuck out her racket and deflected the ball to the other side of the court.Salazar yelled “point!” and instantly ran to hug her teammate at the service line. As they walked to the net to shake the opposing team’s hands, they were still holding onto each other with grins on their face.“The last match wasn’t very good and we didn’t play very well the first doubles match either,” Salazar said, “so we were happy that we finally played better.”Despite being down 40-15 in the final game, Salazar and Shkudun were able to string together a comeback. Combined with strong serves and being vocal with one another on the court, the duo was able to give Syracuse (3-0) its first point of the meet. The Orange never looked back, beating Cornell (2-1), 6-1, at Drumlins Country Club on Sunday. Shkudun and Salazar have now played three matches together this season, losing just once.“I think (Valeria and Anna) are one of the best teams in the country. They’re very talented,” head coach Younes Limam said. “They both feed off of each other.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textWhile she did appear in the doubles match against Liberty yesterday, Salazar sat out during the singles match to rest and ice herself. The day off did not leave her rusty, proving so in her performance on the court on Sunday.“If anything (the day off) helped. I got surgery during the summer. It’s kind of a chronic injury, I can’t do anything about it,” Salazar said. “We were just trying to save myself so I can last throughout the whole season.”After Salazar and Shkudun’s doubles win to put Syracuse ahead of Cornell by a point, Salazar focused on her singles match. In the first set, the game was back-and-forth.The lead fluctuated often and, at times, Salazar made little mistakes to let her opponent creep back in. Other times, the ball landed just out of bounds, and when Cornell’s Dena Tanenbaum raised her finger, Salazar questioned her and became flustered. Whenever a similar situation happened, associate head coach Shelley George was right there to calm down and refocus the junior.“After every point’s over with, you basically say let it go, let’s start over,” George said. “You have to basically start it up each time. It’s just reminding (Valeria). She’s got good habits on the court.”All the fans shifted their attention to the singles match between Salazar and Tanenbaum. The players who had finished, or did not play, crowded around and cheered on each point. The phrases “Go Red!” and “Go Orange” were screamed over and over. Ahead 6-5 on the tiebreak, Salazar hit a return that Tanenbaum failed to hit over the net. Salazar smiled, as Tanenbaum dropped her head down in anger.Salazar finished the game strong and walked away with another singles win to add to this season’s undefeated singles record. The junior has become one of the more reliable options for Limam and Syracuse, as she is penciled in at No. 1 for doubles and No. 2 for singles.“[Valeria] was awesome today. Valeria is a gamer,” George said. “Whatever the situation is, she’s going to give her best effort. Good things come from a fighter like that on the court.” Comments Published on January 31, 2016 at 4:54 pm Contact Charlie: csdistur@syr.edu | @charliedisturco Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

Amazon believes an exemption is in the publics be

first_imgAmazon believes an exemption is in the public’s best interest because it progresses Congress’ goal to launch commercial small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS) in the US faster. –Christina MulliganAmazon announces new mobile web development tools for AWS at NYC SummitAmazon debuted an updated mobile SDK and new Cognito, Zocalo and Mobile Analytics services at the 2014 Amazon Web Services Summit in New York City.The company detailed the new and updated developer products and services in a blog post explaining how these mobile development offerings will make it easier to build AWS-powered mobile apps. In the updated AWS Mobile SDK, new features include a DynamoDB object mapper for iOS, an S3 transfer manager and support enhancements for Android, Amazon’s FireOS and iOS/Objective-C.The Amazon Cognito service is focused on data synchronization and user identity for developers to manage data synchronization across devices. Amazon Zocalo is a secure enterprise storage and sharing service that can be managed from any device, and Amazon Mobile Analytics uses raw app data to calculate and report various metrics to developers.For more information, check out the AWS blog post. –Rob Marvin Kids programming robots to learn new skillsWith just a smart tablet and Angry Birds, Georgia Institute of Technology researchers are making it possible for kids to program robots. The researchers have paired an Android tablet paired with a small humanoid robot, and kids are teaching it how to play Angry Birds just by dragging their finger on the tablet and flinging the birds across the screen. While the kids are playing Angry Birds, the robot is watching and recording what’s happening in it’s memory, and then mimics what the child did when it is their turn to play.“The robot is able to learn by watching because it knows how interaction with a tablet app is supposed to work,” said Ayanna Howard, professor of electrical and computer engineering at Georgia Tech. –Christina MulliganAmazon wants the FAA to allow them to test their delivery dronesAmazon is petitioning the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) for permission to test their drones, Amazon Prime Air, in the United States. Currently, Amazon is limited to conducting R&D flights indoors or outside the country because it is a commercial enterprise.“Amazon would prefer to keep the focus, jobs, and investments of this important research and development initiative in the United States by conducting private research and development operations outdoors near Seattle,” Paul Misener, VP of global public policy at Amazon, wrote in a letter to FAA.last_img read more