Lady Panther Classic returns

first_imgFour local girls basketball teams will get their first up-close looks at each other this weekend as the 39th annual Lady Panther Classic begins today at McKinleyville High.St. Bernard’s will get the weekend started with a first-round clash against Redding Christian at 5 p.m. and Fortuna will finish the night up with a contest against Yreka at 8 p.m. while the tournament’s host team, McKinleyville, will face Hoopa in its first-round matchup today at 6:30 p.m.The best offense is a…Good …last_img read more

Daily Mullets (October 21)

first_imgFootball NewsDavid Beaty really really really likes this OSU team. [PFB]Mike Gundy on Mason Rudolph: “He’s always been really tough when you think about it. He’s been tough, played with a broken foot (last season). I think he feels better.” [NewsOK]Ranking the first six uniform combos. Good post here. I would have black-black-gray and the traditional white-orange-white higher and Monster Chrome Pete lower. [CRFF]Get to know KU. Good stuff here from Steven Mandeville. [PFB]Not everyone hates 11 a.m. games. Here’s Devante Averette: “It’s like playing when I was little. We used to play 11 o’clock games. When you get up, it’s just time to ball. That’s what I love about the game. I’ll be ready.” [O’Colly]Previewing the second half of OSU’s season. [PFB]S&P has OSU by 19 and F+ has OSU by 16 this weekend. [Football Study Hall]Ramon Richards sets an alarm to remind himself how good he is. [PFB]Berry Tramel picks OSU by a TD. [NewsOK]Good reporting here on DeQuinton Osborne’s story by Kyle Fredrickson. Was a monstrous pickup by OSU. [NewsOK]How good is this? While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. Just found this photo from the #okstate Iowa State game. How amazing is that dude’s face! pic.twitter.com/kXvzYp58H4— Pistols Firing (@pistolsguys) October 20, 2016I love it when Gundy goes rogue with his Twitter account. I want more.Stillwater band was awesome tonight! @Stillwaterbands pic.twitter.com/bcNufdf7kL— Mike Gundy (@CoachGundy) October 21, 2016Around the CountryI don’t understand how OU and Texas have possibly the two worst pass defenses in the Big 12. [LGG]This Louisville scandal is a mess, but Rick Pitino got off pretty easy. For Pitino and Louisville, that’s the most favorable way the NCAA could have framed one of the most salacious recruiting scandals in college sports history. [Yahoo]I honestly can’t think of a coach who has received such kid glove treatment for being in the middle of some truly sleazy stuff.— Dan Wolken (@DanWolken) October 20, 2016The worst fake punt in CFB history. Tough to argue. [Yahoo]I’m in, although I hope it’s not for another decade (at least).No question. I’ve always wondered if OK State would be in a position to get him home first … https://t.co/CrQxE4csCx— Travis Haney (@travhaney) October 21, 2016Expansion NewsThe Big 12 needed to get stronger to justify the efficacy of its conference championship game. It needed to add teams. Strong teams. Two would have been fine. Four would have been better. It needed to justify the creation of its own TV network. It needed to expand its brand into bigger markets. It needed to compete with the other Power Five conferences. It needed to stand up at a podium and bellow, “We’re here to stay.” Instead, it cowered before the spotlight and meekly whimpered, “We’ll be fine.” [O’Colly]70 percent of you think the Big 12 will die a slow death. [PFB]This is well said by Jake Trotter: “The Big 12 has to stop being its own worst enemy. You know why people think the Big 12 is unstable, unsteady and indecisive? Because its own board chair termed the league “psychologically disadvantaged.” The conference really wasn’t in that bad of shape at the time David Boren uttered that phrase.“The TV distribution was on par with the ACC and Pac-12. The tier 3 revenue some of the schools had been generating was beginning to be significant. Oklahoma was about to make the CFP and the Final Four. Instead of building on all of that, the Big 12 went predictably went haywire, and conducted a overly dramatic, drawn-out process that did nothing for the league except give it a championship game.” [ESPN]Baseball NewsOne big reason Andrew Heaney got the Roberto Clement award: He and wife, Jordan, made plans for another offseason mission trip to Honduras. They have taken a group there each of the past two years to work with Hearts2Honduras, a charity trying to break the cycle of poverty in one of the poorest countries in the world. [NewsOK]OSU’s 2017 schedule is out, and the highlight is probably a CWS rematch with Arizona. [PFB]Hoops NewsThis is awesome — Mike Cobbins and Anthony Hickey reunited. [PFB]Brad Underwood remains the dude, can’t believe a college pom girl doesn’t drink “skinny fraps.” [PFB]Brad Underwood and a culture of defense. [PFB]last_img read more

James Washington, Zach Sinor Snubbed As Awards Finalists

first_imgJames Washington was snubbed as a Biletnikoff Award finalist on Monday as OU’s Dede Westbrook, Northwestern’s Austin Carr and East Carolina’s Zay Jones were named the three finalists. Here’s how The President stacks up against those three when it comes to numbers this season.screen-shot-2016-11-21-at-4-30-26-pmHe has had three stinker games (SE Louisiana, Kansas and TCU) which you can’t really afford to do when you’re gunning for this award. More egregiously, Zach Sinor was left off of the Ray Guy Award finalist list. Where are we at in society?!https://twitter.com/ZachSinor29/status/800827943463358464Also, as Carson Cunningham pointed out, this dude is a finalist.Also, Baker Mayfield, Deshaun Watson and Lamar Jackson are the three QBs that are finalists for the Davey O’Brien award. Bulletin board material for Bedlam, all of it.Finalists for a number of college football awards announced: pic.twitter.com/KRpJefdIDE— Kevin McGuire (@KevinOnCFB) November 21, 2016 While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

Former OSU Offensive Lineman Pertile Lands at Virginia

first_imgFormer Oklahoma State offensive lineman Brandon Pertile, who spent 2 seasons in Stillwater after joining as a junior college transfer, has landed at the University of Virginia. He announced the news in a tweet on Tuesday:Today I am officially a Cavalier… It’s a great day! pic.twitter.com/wz5iuFtNlD— Brandon Pertile (@BrandonPertile) February 21, 2017“After talking with Coach Gundy, I have decided to grad-transfer from Oklahoma State to play my fifth year elsewhere while pursuing a law degree,” he said in January.Pertile spent the majority of his time in Stillwater playing on special teams and in a reserve role along the offensive line. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

League Wide: Investing for the Future

first_imgLet’s take a look at some news around the Big 12 from the past week. State of the UnionESPN’s Jake Trotter expertly recapped the last year in the Big 12, perhaps best elaborated by the league’s most chatty school president, David Boren.“I think the day has come and gone of, ‘Is the Big 12 in danger? Is the Big 12 here to stay? Is it a stable conference?’ I don’t even think that’s an issue anymore,” Boren said. “My goal is to get that topic off the table. … I think we’re on firm ground now. We’re financially in a strong position. We’re very tied to each other. We have many traditional rivalries.“I feel much more confident about where we are than I did even two or three years ago or this time last year. … I think there’s a lot of sticking power to this conference, and the best days are ahead.”That will be put to the test for a league that now has six presidents or chancellors who’ve been on the job for two years or less. [ESPN]Harvard Business School will be breaking down Bob Bowlsby and David Boren’s comments for years, surveying the leadership tactics of an organization for ways to resolve factions … or minimize discomfort in the short-term.Kansas Writing ChecksKU is putting $300m into its football program.Kansas athletic director Sheahon Zenger said at a booster event Wednesday night that the school was planning a $300 million investment in its football facilities. While details of the project are sparse, it would include an indoor football facility and upgrades to Memorial Stadium per Kansas.com. [Yahoo Sports]No more high school stadium for KU — a good move in posturing for future realignment opportunities.Rocket Launching RaiderThe KC Chiefs are raving about former Texas Tech QB Pat Mahomes and his arm strength.“Man, this kid can throw a football,” Kansas City Chiefs RB Charcandrick West said of QB Patrick Mahomes II, reports Edward Lewis of NFL.com. That isn’t something that many have said about incumbent starting QB Alex Smith throughout his career and is expected to keep the starting job for the time being. [ProFootballFocus]West probably didn’t watch the Tech-OU game last year when Mahomes just shredded OU’s secondary. A fascinating question on who regresses more: OU without Bob or Tech’s offense without Mahomes? Best in TexasA Dallas publication put out their ranking for the best coach in Texas and it’s hard to disagree.(Gary Patterson) is the Frogs’ all-time winningest coach and has led TCU to six conference championships, in three different leagues. Patterson’s winning percentage (.734) ranks fifth among active coaches nationally and puts him as one of just three active coaches with at least 149 victories at their current school. [SportsDay]Herman is already second and that’s tough to argue. Sumlin quits game planning in November, Art’s long gone and Kliff’s 40 percent as competitive on the field as he is in GQ.Transfer UWhile Oklahoma State has consistently employed graduate transfers effectively, Dana Holgorsen has taken a different yet similar route.Not every transfer has worked out, but Holgorsen, now entering his sixth season at WVU, has developed a track record of being a fruitful landing spot for players looking for a change in scenery.West Virginia won’t land atop the yearly recruiting rankings, but the program does just fine developing its heap of mainly three-star prospects. Coupling that with transfers — guys like Charles Sims (Houston), Clint Trickett (Florida State) and Shaq Riddick (Gardner-Webb) all had their moments — has been a nice formula during the Holgorsen era.Holgorsen hopes that continues in 2017 — especially with Will Grier. [Yahoo Sports]OSU has lived off of system-fitting three stars, Bill Snyder owns the junior colleges, Texas and OU recruit by stars nationally and Dana pounces opportunistically when opportunities arise with all the above. While you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up.last_img read more

The Reload: Darrell Simpson Sets Commitment Date, Top DL Offered on Visit

first_imgWhile you’re here, we’d like you to consider subscribing to Pistols Firing and becoming a PFB+ member. It’s a big ask from us to you, but it also comes with a load of benefits like ad-free browsing (ads stink!), access to our premium room in The Chamber and monthly giveaways.The other thing it does is help stabilize our business into the future. As it turns out, sending folks on the road to cover games and provide 24/7 Pokes coverage like the excellent article you just read costs money. Because of our subscribers, we’ve been able to improve our work and provide the best OSU news and community anywhere online. Help us keep that up. OSU is hopping in the game late with Brown, which leads me to ask two questions: Do they know their fate with Israel Antwine, the newly decommitted OKC area prospect? And are they still in it with Tayland Humphrey, the top JUCO d-tackle? My guess is that both questions don’t have answers. But if I were betting, I’d say OSU has a better shot at landing the latter than the former.Brown is a pipe-dreamer, in my opinion. But his evaluation from Scout suggests he’s a cant-miss player worth taking a shot on.With outstanding frame potential for the interior defensive line in multiple schemes, Bobby Brown has emerged as one of the top D-line prospects in the state of Texas for the 2018 class. Brown possesses good height and rare length, even for a defensive end, though he projects best to the interior as a tackle, most likely in a four-man front. That said, Brown has the athleticism to fit multiple roles in varying schemes, giving him coveted scheme- and position-versatility. Brown is a high-motor prospect who comes from a good program (Arlington Lamar) that competes in Texas high school football’s largest classification. He shows the ability to maintain his balance and leverage mid-contact, which is not often the case with young prospects who possess his height and length. Once he gets more consistent with his get-off at the snap, Brown will be a dangerous pass-rusher, especially considering his wingspan. Brown is raw right now, but possesses uncommon physical characteristics that suggest he’s primed to emerge as one of the top defensive line prospects in the state – and potentially the nation – for the 2018 recruiting cycle. — Gabe BrooksPrediction: Alabama2020 cornerback Korie Black offeredWaco area prospect Korie Black reported his second Division-I offer after mini-camp Saturday from OSU. Being from Waco, Black was first discovered by the Baylor Bears early in Matt Rhule’s regime.Blessed and honored to have received my second offer from Oklahoma State University #gopokes ??? pic.twitter.com/JPMlgKcDM1— 2 (@Mightyy_K2) July 30, 2017Black is a 6-foot standout from Connally High School, and while his recruitment is way too early to call, I’ll predict he stays home and plays for Baylor. The Reload is PFB’s recruiting recap catching you up to speed with the latest Oklahoma State recruiting news, with an ear to the ground for what to expect.Four-star 2018 tackle sets commitment dateTop-ranked offensive tackle prospect Darrell Simpson has set his commitment date for August 12, he announced this week on Twitter.Simpson is a four-star, top-200 talent from Northwest High School in Justin, Texas, widely viewed as a top-10 prospect at his position in the region. He has been on OSU’s radar for years now and recently included OSU in his group of final 8 schools.I predicted this spring (a bold prediction, admittedly) that OSU would be his landing spot. But I don’t see the Cowboys winning this battle. The 6-7 talent is a heavy OU lean by most prognosticators, and I think that’s where he ultimately winds up. But keep an eye on any late developments that could swing his recruitment in the final days before he pledges.Oklahoma State has commitments at offensive line from Bryce Bray, Hunter Anthony, Hunter Woodard, Tyrese Williams and Jacob Farrell, but Simpson would be a must-take under any circumstance. Despite Josh Henson’s accomplishments in filling out a star-studded class to this point, landing Simpson would be the crown jewel of not only his group, but also of the 2018 class.Prediction: OklahomaFour-star 2018 d-lineman offeredFour-star defensive lineman Bobby Brown was one of two prospects to pick up an offer over the weekend at OSU’s final mini-camp of the summer.Brown is an Arlington Lamar prospect with 20 scholarship opportunities and counting, rated as the No. 14 defensive tackle prospect in the nation by 247Sports.last_img read more

Why one jar is not enough

first_imgDuring Labor Day weekend, my husband and I were exploring the Virginia countryside, which included a visit to the Graffiti House. The Graffiti House was used as a field hospital during the Civil War and still houses fascinating graffiti from the soldiers of that time. The building is also the headquarters of the Brandy Station Foundation and serves as a museum and visitor’s center for the nearby Brandy Station Battlefield. While Helen, the volunteer guide, showed us around the main floor of the house, I noticed that instead of having just one central donation jar, there were other donation jars placed around the exhibits and in various rooms. The jars were located in areas where visitors would be the most engaged: in the library where a short film was shown, next to binders where history buffs could research individual names, and near the “Wall of Honor” where visitors could leave their own signatures. I found this to be a good source of inspiration we can all use as year-end fundraising season rapidly approaches. Whether you’re collecting donations through your online fundraising campaigns, at an event, or even with Costco-sized pickle jars, it’s essential to provide easy pathways to give at the point of inspiration. Enable donors to give when they are in the moment of feeling the impact of your work. Don’t assume that someone will be moved to donate and then go on a mad hunt to find a way to give you their money. Some ways to make this work…On your website: Don’t just plop a big, juicy donate button at the top of your website and call it a day. Do that, and then also add links to donate from your blog, success stories, and photo galleries. In your fundraising appeals: Pause for a breath in your next fundraising email and offer direct links to your donation page at strategic points in your story.At your fundraising events: Make it easy to sign up to be a recurring donor on the spot and offer mobile giving options for donors who are in a generous mood, but no longer carry a checkbook.How are you making it easy for donors to give at the moments they are inspired by your work?last_img read more

Reboot with These 6 Summer Camp Strategies

first_imgOur daughter Charlotte’s world right now is probably familiar to many of you. She’s in the middle of a blissful summer at a few different day and overnight camps. At the end of every day, her mind and creativity are stimulated, she’s made new friends, and she sleeps soundly with a smile on her face. Charlotte finishes the summer inspired, energized, and smarter than ever.As a longtime overnight camper myself, I greatly envy her. Finally, this summer I decided to follow her summer camp strategy lead and am doing something completely different from the everyday. I’m taking a two-month sabbatical to refresh and restore—my first-ever break beyond a brief vacation since I rushed out of college to work.For many, however, a sabbatical isn’t possible, so I wanted to outline effective approaches used by fellow nonprofit staffers and consultants. I became a reboot detective, determined to find what’s working since rebooting is so valuable and so productive in teeing you up for a great fall and beyond.I did what I typically do when I’m looking for answers—ask my friends and colleagues. Here are some of the fantastic approaches I heard from our peers in the field:Seek a different point of view. Gillian Ream Gainsley, who works in communications and development at the Ypsilanti District Library in Michigan, does something very surprising.“My summer camp plan is to go to overnight camp. Literally. I’m on the board of a summer camp and spend a week volunteering there every year. It’s the most rejuvenating part of my year,” Gillian says.“Mostly, it’s a fantastic break. But I do communications for a youth organization, so it’s a great way to take a deep dive into how kids talk and think and feel. You have a much better sense of what their (and their parents’) needs are after a week of 24-hour interaction at camp.”Get together and get outside. Caroline Avakian, founder of Source Rise, which connects journalists with experts in international development, spends more time outdoors and with her family. “Not only is it necessary, but I find that it fuels my work and creativity, making me much more productive during my work time,” she says.Make a commitment to doing summer differently. Unless you’re lucky enough to actually go to summer camp, as Gillian does, it can be super hard to pry yourself away from the day-to-day routine, no matter how much you want to. That’s where I often fall.You’re much more likely to succeed in getting to your own version of summer camp if you formalize your commitment. I did so by telling a few close friends and colleagues about my plan and asking them to keep me honest. My husband is good at policing as well!I’m not alone here. “I have to consciously cut down on work hours to do that,” admits Caroline. “But it’s worth it since my productivity shoots up when I do get down to business. I tend to goal-set instead of clocking in my hours, so as long as I feel I’ve met my goals, I’m happy. That said, my ‘summer camp’ goals tend to be more focused on strategic priorities and organization. That focus gears me up and preps me for the busy fall season.”Take a new approach to the same old. Danielle Brigida, senior manager of social strategy and integration for the National Wildlife Federation, is one of the most creative people I know. She brings that creativity to the way she tackles her work, including her own version of summer camp.Like most of us, a lot of Danielle’s day is spent tackling ongoing challenges. Although the challenges themselves don’t vary wildly, she spices up the way she approaches them: “I break out the sidewalk chalk and the Idea Frisbee in the summer. I grab whomever I’m working with, and I just toss the Frisbee around when we need to think up clever names or ideas around campaigns. We find that moving while we brainstorm really helps.” Work your body, nourish your soul. Many of the folks I spoke with increase their physical activity when summer comes around or add seasonal treats like biking and waterskiing.Danielle, for example, goes way beyond the Idea Frisbee. “I went out on a limb and signed up for a marathon in Iceland in late August,” she says. “So I’m mostly training for that and spending as much time outside as I can. I also try to balance the running with yoga.”Connect with peers in the field to build satisfaction and smarts. Graphic designer Julia Reich uses summer’s slight dip in her firm’s client work to build relationships with other nonprofit marketers and, she hopes, find some strong strategic alliances.How will you get a little summer camp this summer? Please chime in with your comments to share how you recharge and look at things differently. With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build the strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

Our Common Challenges

first_imgYesterday Network for Good was honored to host a group of delegates from 10 countries as part of the U.S. Department of State’s International Visitor Leadership Program. The group included the Executive Director of the Icelandic Youth Council, the Program Director for the Russian Red Cross, the Community Manager from the Office of the Mayor of Athens, and a grassroots organizer from Saudi Arabia, among others who work with local governments and community groups to mobilize volunteers and social giving around the world.So honored to host @StateDept IVLP guests in a discussion on nonprofits + tech. Thx to @caryn74 for moderating! pic.twitter.com/oxcC9ZN3Bd— Network for Good (@Network4Good) January 27, 2015As we gathered to talk about leveraging online technology to mobilize volunteers, raise funds, and communicate with supporters, it was clear that the challenges these international organizations face are nearly identical to those of nonprofits here in the United States. Here are a few themes that rose to the top during our time together: Diversifying funding sources: Organizations that are highly dependent on government contracts or grants look to shift their funding sources to reduce the vulnerability of relying on one source of funds. In some cases, this shift to individual giving is new territory and these organizations are sorting out how to prioritize individual donors and the resources needed to support a successful strategy. Sound familiar?Finding (and retaining) the right donors: The universal challenge, but also a wonderful opportunity to learn from one another. For some international organizations, most individual donors are coming from outside of the country, so connecting with and expanding the donor base can be difficult. This is where new networking tools and storytelling venues will continue to make a big impact.Communicating with donors: We all agreed that the key to retaining individual donors is regular and responsive communication. Some organizations are trying to find the right balance of interaction and dedicated time to responding to donors and listening to their feedback.Collaboration vs. competition: With many organizations working to solve similar issues, these NGOs identified a need for more collaboration and stronger networks to pool resources, and make a bigger impact. This is a challenge. One way we can all encourage knowledge and resource sharing is to commit to supporting and participating in roundtable discussions and gatherings just like the IVLP sessions.Getting the story right: From attracting supporters to inspiring gifts to retaining donors, compelling stories are critical. The delegation discussed the challenges of competing with more “media friendly” stories or causes, and the opportunities to connect the right story with the right audience segment. Organizations are made up of multiple stories, which provides a wonderful chance to line up the perfect story with the right segment of a cause’s community.Do any of these strike a chord with you? What would you add to the list? Please share your thoughts in the comments below! We offer our gratitude to the Department of State and the IVLP delegates for spending time with our team and sharing their experiences. We wish them well as they continue their tour of the U.S. and look forward to learning more from our nonprofit colleagues around the world.last_img read more

Master Monthly Giving: Q&A with Erica Waasdorp

first_imgTo deliver the most cost-effective and effective monthly giving campaign, launch an email appeal series based on a deadline-driven challenge (matching gift or otherwise). What do fundraisers need to know about how monthly giving has changed since the release of Sleeping Giant in 2013? Why should an organization convert its donors from annual to monthly? Is there any risk of losing existing donors? EW: There are three components of a reliable monthly giving strategy: EW: Well, it depends on how many donors you have who give $100 and less annually. And it depends on how many times you ask your donors for money now—that is, how many times they can give. What’s the most reliable way to convert one-time or annual donors to monthly donors? Erica Waasdorp: What’s changed most dramatically, especially in the past year, is that monthly giving has exploded. The second factor that’s boosted monthly giving is the ease of adding, processing, and managing monthly donors via many donor database and online donation systems. Despite these widespread improvements, automating this process remains one of the biggest hurdles for fundraisers. EW: No, there’s absolutely nothing to lose—as long as you target the right group. In other words, I do not recommend you ask your $250-plus donors to join monthly giving. Unless a donor at that level requests to be a monthly donor, don’t ask. You risk decreasing her gift level. I think the main reason for this growth is fundraisers’ laser focus on donor retention. That focus, already there for some, was further fueled by results of the 2013 AFP Fundraising Effectiveness study, which highlighted the fall of donor retention rates to 39%. That was a real wake-up call for all of us. That’s a perfect lead-in to my next question. Are all existing and new donors ripe for conversion for monthly donors, or is there a specific segment where fundraisers should start? About Erica Waasdorp If you have a robust email list, start there. Focus your first direct mail campaign to donors who give by credit card. Targeting is essential to boost monthly giving campaign results, just as for other types of fundraising campaigns. I’m thrilled to share this monthly giving mastery with you, drawn from my fascinating interview with leading monthly giving expert Erica Waasdorp. Those donors who have given more than once are more likely to convert. But recent monthly giving stats indicate that even nondonor supporters, such as those who have signed a petition, can be converted. You do have to ask them, though. To ensure monthly donors stay with you as long as possible, ask donors to give through electronic funds transfer (that is, via their bank accounts). With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org. In her unequaled guidebook, Monthly Giving: The Sleeping Giant, Erica walks you through recurring giving, step by clear-and-doable step. “Historically, U.S. fundraisers have focused on major gifts. I’m thrilled that organizations are widening their focus to include monthly giving and small to medium gifts. There’s huge potential there,” says Erica. Thanks, Erica! But for those who make gifts of $100 and less annually, there’s no way not to gain by converting them to monthly donors. You’ll retain them as donors and increase their total gifts per year. Plus, monthly donors are six to seven times more likely to make your organization a beneficiary in their wills. Win-win all around, if you ask me. Erica Waasdorp is one of the leading experts on monthly (aka sustainer or recurring) giving. She is the author of Monthly Giving: The Sleeping Giant and co-author of the DonorPerfect Monthly Giving Starter Kit. As president of A Direct Solution, she serves nonprofit organizations in their fundraising and direct marketing needs with a focus on monthly giving, annual funds, and grant writing. What’s the WIIFM (what’s in it for me) for monthly donors? There are two more factors that I think have added to the monthly giving boom. First is the emergence of reliable, thorough monthly giving guidance—from me, Network for Good, and others. This abundance of content triggers interest and provides reliable results-based guidance for fundraisers. Fun features, such as Network for Good’s monthly giving challenge, reinforce interest and skills. EW: The WIIFM depends on which donor group you’re talking to. For example, monthly giving is a fantastic way for donors on a fixed income to make gifts to favorite organizations. It’s easy and convenient, and they can’t forget it. To generate the highest response from your monthly giving recruitment campaign, include calls to your media mix. Email, direct mail, and phone all work, but a combination of all three works even better.last_img read more