Avengers Endgame will mark Stan Lees last Marvel movie cameo

first_img 0 Captain Marvel Stan Lee Marvel Spiderman Thor The Avengers Every Stan Lee Marvel movie cameo Stan Lee plays a hilarious intergalactic barber in the 2017 movie Thor: Ragnarok. Marvel Whenever a new Marvel movie came out, fans had fun trying to spot Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee on the big screen. Lee guest-starred in over 20 Marvel movies — as well as in various TV shows, video games and comics. Lee has appeared as everything from a bus driver to a librarian alongside the comic book characters he created over the years.But since Lee’s death at age 95 in 2018, it’s been unclear how many more posthumous cameos would be granted to the late, great comic book creator, until now. “It’s his last one committed to film,” Avengers: Endgame director Joe Russo told the media on press day in Los Angeles Saturday.  Most recently, Lee had a touching posthumous cameo in Captain Marvel reading a script of director Kevin Smith’s 1995 movie Mallrats, which Lee starred in as himself.Some fans speculated that the upcoming Spider-Man: Far From Home, which hits theaters in July, would feature Lee’s final cameo, especially since Russo told the press earlier this month that “I don’t remember if he was well enough to do the cameo in Homecoming or not.”  Now playing: Watch this: Post a comment Originally published 2:36 p.m. PT.  Stan Lee dies at 95: A look back at his most iconic characters on screen Tags Lee’s Captain Marvel cameo made Kevin Smith a ‘blubbering mess’ Star-studded tribute to Lee: He ‘made us proud to be misfits’ Lee’s Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse cameo will warm your heart 4:51 More Stan Lee 18 Photos Share your voice TV and Movies While it’s bittersweet to learn that Lee’s last hurrah in the MCU is coming up fast, the the extra-long run time for the upcoming Avengers: Endgame movie could mean that Marvel might give Lee more than one appearance in the three-hour movie. “I have to say, I think it’s astonishing that this would be his last cameo,” Russo added. “It’s just kind of mind-boggling that he made it to the end of this run. I can’t believe it.”tec0280-cmp-v006-1037Stan Lee is dressed as an astronaut in the 2017 movie Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2. Marvel After all, Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 allowed for not one but two moments in the film where Lee — dressed as an astronaut — is seen discussing his past adventures with various interested aliens referred to as the Watchers.  Avengers: Endgame is scheduled to open in theaters worldwide on April 26. For more Avengers: Endgame plot theories, characters reveals and news check out our Avengers: Endgame movie guide. If you want to catch every Lee cameo in the MCU movies before the Endgame begins, here’s our guide to streaming all the movies online.last_img read more

After Vijay and Rajinikanth Nayanthara set to work with one more star

first_imgNayanthara to romance Rajinikanth.PR HandoutNayanthara is on a roll. The actress, who is considered to be one of the most sought after actresses in South India, is working with some of the big names of Tamil and Telugu films. Now, she seems to be ready to work with one more star.Yes, Nayanthara has been offered Suriya’s 39th movie, which will be directed by Siruthai Siva. The makers have approached her to play the female lead and the talks are reportedly underway. She has already worked with the actor in the films like AR Murugadoss’ Ghajini (South version), KS Ravikumar’s Aadhavan and Venkat Prabhu’s Massu Engira Maasilamani.Not to forget, Nayanthara was part of Siruthai Siva’s 2019 superhit movie, Viswasam in which she paired up with Ajith Kumar. The actress had a strong role in the film. With the film becoming a hit and sharing a good rapport with the director, she has very little chances of turning down the offer.Nayanthara is one of the busiest actresses in South India who has ample of interesting projects in her kitty. She has teamed up with stars like Chiranjeevi in Sye Raa Narasimha Reddy, Vijay in the untitled film (Thalapathy 63), Rajinikanth’s Darbar and Sivakarthikeyan’s Mr Local.Coming back to Suriya’s film with Siva, the forthcoming film is being funded by Studio Green. The shooting of the movie will begin in June. Vetri is the cinematographer, while Ruben is the editor. A screen shot from Suriya’s NGK.YouTube screenshotlast_img read more

The AFRO American Newspapers Diversity in Careers Education Expo

first_imgJob seekers and aspiring students get motivate, come in your best dress and bring your resumes to the expo on October 17th from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. The AFRO is connecting employers and educators with the community.last_img

Radioisotope studies show the continental crust formed 3 billion years ago

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: “Emergence of modern continental crust about 3 billion years ago” Nature Geoscience, 2015. DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2466AbstractThe continental crust is the principal record of conditions on the Earth during the past 4.4 billion years. However, how the continental crust formed and evolved through time remains highly controversial. In particular, the composition and thickness of juvenile continental crust are unknown. Here we show that Rb/Sr ratios can be used as a proxy for both the silica content and the thickness of the continental crust. We calculate Rb/Sr ratios of the juvenile crust for over 13,000 samples, with Nd model ages ranging from the Hadean to Phanerozoic. The ratios were calculated based on the evolution of Sr isotopes in the period between the TDM Nd model age and the crystallization of the samples analysed. We find that the juvenile crust had a low silica content and was largely mafic in composition during the first 1.5 billion years of Earth’s evolution, consistent with magmatism on a pre-plate tectonics planet. About 3 billion years ago, the Rb/Sr ratios of the juvenile continental crust increased, indicating that the newly formed crust became more silica-rich and probably thicker. This transition is in turn linked to the onset of plate tectonics5 and an increase of continental detritus into the oceans. Earth’s crust slowly being destroyed © 2015 Phys.org One of the difficulties with determining the age of the Earth’s crust is that the crust itself is constantly undergoing melting and re-deposition due to subduction. This is a larger factor for the ocean floor than in continental crust because the continental crust is thick and buoyant, making it less susceptible to subduction. By combining information from various radioisotope pairs found in the continental crust, one can unearth clues as to how the crust was formed and when. In this paper, Dhuime, et al. studied the abundance of rubidium compared to strontium. Rubidium (87Rb) becomes strontium-87 (87Sr) through radioactive decay. Strontium-87 has a half-life of 48.8 billion years. Strontium-86, the most abundant isotope of Sr, is stable and does not undergo radioactive decay. Therefore, the abundance of 87Sr in the continental crust can be traced to the radioactive decay of 87Rb, and based on its half-life, one can determine the age of a rock sample.Whenever the Earth’s crust re-melts or is formed from magma deposition, the amount of 87Rb and silica increases in the residual melt, but the amount of 86Sr does not. Consequently, 87Rb/86Sr correlates with silica content. The silica content is important because the composition of the continental crust is predominantly silica, while the early Earth’s crust was likely mafic, or composed of predominantly iron and magnesium. To calculate 87Rb/86Sr, Dhuime, et al. first determined the 87Sr-to-86Sr ratio and then determined what the ratio was at the time when the crustal melt crystallized. From this they were able to calculate 87Rb/86Sr and therefore determine the amount of silica present at various time periods.This calculation was performed for over 13,000 volcanic and plutonic rock samples of varying ages, based on neodymium model ages. Results show that at about 3 billion years ago the Earth’s continental crust transitioned from a mafic crust to a silica-rich crust. Silica content increased from 3 billion years to 1 billion years ago. At 1 billion years, the amount of silica started to gradually decrease. This result coincides with previous studies using other radioisotope ratios. Furthermore, Dhuime, et al.’s data show that there is a positive correlation between the increase in 87Rb/86Sr and silica and crustal thickness. The authors point out that the gradual increase of 87Rb/86Sr from 3 billion years to 1 billion years may indicate that the Earth’s continental crust was thickening. They estimate that the average thickness of new continental crust increases from ~20 km at 3 billion years ago to ~40 km at 1 billion years ago, and then decreases to ~30 km to the present.Since subduction is a result of plate activity, the transition at 3 billion years may also indicate the onset of plate tectonics. The thickness of new continental crust reached a maximum and then began decreasing. The authors point out that this may coincide with the time of the Rodinia supercontinent and mountain formation.Overall, this study provides compelling evidence that the continental crust formed 3 billion years ago, coinciding with the onset of plate tectonics. Additionally, silica content could be used as a metric for determining crust thickness over time. Journal information: Nature Geosciencecenter_img (Phys.org)—New research sheds light on how and when the modern day continents began to form. Researchers from the University of Bristol analyzed radio isotope abundances in 13,000 samples of continental crust of varying age and found that the continents began to form around 3 billion years ago. This date may coincide with when plate tectonics began. Their research appears in Nature Geoscience. Citation: Radioisotope studies show the continental crust formed 3 billion years ago (2015, July 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2015-07-radioisotope-continental-crust-billion-years.html Explore further Variation in the thickness of juvenile continental crust through time. Credit: (c) 2015 Nature Geoscience, 2015. doi:10.1038/ngeo2466last_img read more