Rep Lauwers Roadside saliva test eliminated from drugged driving bills

first_imgMichigan State Police Sgt. Dewayne Gill answers a question during committee testimony for House Bills 5383-85.  Also testifying, from left, are state Rep. Dan Lauwers, St. Clair County Deputy Sheriff Dave Ferguson, and Kenneth Stecker of the Prosecuting Attorneys Association of Michigan.Legislation to protect Michigan motorists from repeat drugged drivers will not include the use of a roadside saliva test for controlled substances under legislation amended this morning by the House Judiciary Committee.House Bills 5383-85, introduced by Rep. Dan Lauwers, help keep dangerous motorists off Michigan streets by ensuring immediate jail time for repeat offenders and better communication between law enforcement agencies.“The purpose and intent of these bills has always been to improve communication between law enforcement agencies and protect motorists from repeat drugged drivers,” said Lauwers, R-Brockway Township.  “We listened to the concerns about the saliva test, and made the bills even stronger and more effective.  The ultimate goal of these measures has not changed.  We want to make our roads safer for Michigan motorists.”Under the legislation, the state Legislature must now separately authorize a pilot program conducted by the State Police before a roadside saliva test could be used in Michigan.  The pilot program would have to be tested for at least three years in five counties.The legislation also places a conditional bond on drivers who are arrested for operating under the influence of drugs, puts the bond into the Law Enforcement Information Network (LEIN), and requires drugged motorists to be given a permit license similar to a drunken driving offense.“Police officers would be able to easily identify repeat drugged drivers with this paper permit, much in the same way repeat drunken drivers are identified,” Lauwers said.  “It’s a common-sense way to make sure repeat drugged drivers are no longer able to harm other motorists or themselves.”St. Clair County Deputy Sheriff Dave Ferguson, who is specifically trained to evaluate and detect drugged drivers, testified before the committee along with Michigan State Police Sgt. Dewayne Gill and Kenneth Stecker of the Prosecuting Attorneys Association of Michigan.The bills remain under consideration in the House Judiciary Committee. 08May Rep. Lauwers: Roadside saliva test eliminated from drugged driving bills Categories: Lauwers News,Lauwers Photoslast_img

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