Second blogger freed, one day after his colleague

first_imgNews Help by sharing this information November 19, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Second blogger freed, one day after his colleague Russian peacekeepers deny foreign reporters access to Nagorno-Karabakh RSF_en June 4, 2021 Find out more ——————————————————————————————–Blogger released on parole after 16 months in jail11.18.2010Reporters Without Borders is relieved and delighted to learn that a Baku appeal court has just ordered the conditional release of Adnan Hajizade, a blogger who has spent the past 16 months in prison after being arrested on a trumped-up charge of hooliganism in July 2009 and getting a 24-month sentence. The press freedom organization reiterates its call for the release of fellow blogger Emin Milli, who was given a 30-month jail sentence in the same case, and newspaper editor Eynulla Fatullayev, who has been in prison since April 2007.“Adnan Hajizade is free and this is very good news,” Reporters Without Borders said. “It follows an exemplary campaign by his family, civil society and bloggers in Azerbaijan and other countries and pressure from the international community.”The press freedom organisation added: “We nonetheless regret that his conviction has not been quashed as we have always insisted that he was arrested for exercising the right to free expression and was jailed on grotesque charges after a sham trial. The vigilance must not let up and the campaigning must continue in order to protect him from any kind of harassment or intimidation by the authorities and to obtain the release of Milli and Fatullayev.”As he left the court building, Hajizade said he would resume his blogging and had no plans to leave Azerbaijan. “I am not guilty and will demand full rehabilitation,” he said. “Freedom is my right. I will also demand the release of my friend Emin Milli. There are no grounds for him to be in prison.”Reporters Without Borders was one of nine human rights organizations that carried out a joint fact-finding visit to Baku from 7 to 9 September to examine the situation of free expression. One of the recommendations of the report issued after the visit was for the immediate and unconditional release of Hajizade, Milli and Fatullayev.Both the European Parliament and U.S. President Barack Obama had urged the Azerbaijani authorities to free the two bloggers and Fatullayev. And a ruling issued by the European Court of Human Rights on 22 April called for Fatullayev’s release on the grounds that the charges on which he was convicted were politically motivated.Last week Azerbaijan’s supreme court partially complied with the European Court’s ruling by quashing his conviction on charges of terrorism and inciting hatred, but upheld his conviction on charges of tax fraud and possession of heroin (http://en.rsf.org/azerbaidjan-in-latest-humiliation-newspaper-05-11-2010,38761.html).Hajizade and Milli were arrested in Baku on 8 July 2009 after going to the police to report the fact that they had just been assaulted by two men in a restaurant. Hajizade is a video-blogger and member of the non-political “OL! Youth Movement.” Milli is one of the founders of a movement called “The Alumni Network.”They were sentenced on 11 November 2009 to 30 and 24 months in prison respectively on a charge of hooliganism. It was clear that the charge was politically motivated and that they were in fact being persecuted for criticising the authorities and, in particular, for circulating a video that made fun of corrupt politicians.See photos and video of a demonstration that was organized in Paris by Reporters Without Borders and by the Adnan and Emin support committeeAdnan Hajizade with friends and family. 18th Nov. 2010 Organisation The blogger Emin Milli was released today by a Baku appeal court, one day after his friend and fellow blogger, Adnan Hajizade, was freed. The court ruled that the remaining 14 months of his 30-month jail sentence were “suspended.”Milli and Hajizade were arrested on a trumped charge of hooliganism in July 2009 because a satirical video that had been posted online. They were sentenced in November 2009 to 30 and 24 months in prison respectively.Reporters Without Borders reiterates its call for the release of newspaper editor Eynulla Fatullayev, who has been detained since April 2007. The European Court of Human Rights ruled last April that he was being held illegally and should be freed at once.Emin Milli RSF calls for a fully transparent investigation after mine kills two journalists in Azerbaijan AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia Receive email alerts News “We’ll hold Ilham Aliyev personally responsible if anything happens to this blogger in France” RSF says June 8, 2021 Find out more News Follow the news on Azerbaijan News to go further AzerbaijanEurope – Central Asia April 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

The Beatles Pioneer The Modern Stadium Rock Show At New York’s Shea Stadium, On This Day In 1965

first_imgToday, all of the biggest names in popular music make their way around the world on tour by way of large outdoor stadiums, filling the enormous structures with tens of thousands of fans. Playing to a packed, screaming stadium crowd, on the ground usually occupied by the world’s greatest athletes, is a “holy grail” dream for every aspiring musician. But that wasn’t always the case. The stadium rock show dream was born with an historic bang 52 years ago today, August 15th, 1965, when The Beatles headlined Shea Stadium, home of the New York Mets.The Beatles at Shea Stadium: An Interview With Dave Schwensen, Author Of The 2013 Book On The First Ever Stadium Rock ShowThe concert has been documented at length for its historical significance, from books, to editorials, to a documentary film produced by TV icon Ed Sullivan, a sprawling 14-camera snapshot of the de facto peak of “Beatlemania” in the U.S. In his 2013 book The Beatles at Shea Stadium: The Story Behind Their Greatest Concert, author Dave Schwensen details all the surrounding circumstances and cultural significance of the band’s Shea Stadium debut. Live For Live Music’s Bob Wilson spoke to Schwensen ahead of the legendary show’s 50th anniversary, and the writer doled out countless astounding anecdotes about the show and history surrounding it. (You can read the full interview here). On the anniversary of The Beatles’ 1965 Shea Stadium show, we’ve gathered a few of the best story lines from the fabled event. Here are 5 things you may not have known about one of the most influential rock concerts of all time, courtesy of Dave Schwensen:On the enormous risk of booking the show, and the balls-y promise that sealed the deal:Dave Schwensen: “A subtitle for [my] book could’ve been (and almost was) ‘The Birth of Stadium Rock.’ Nothing on this scale had ever happened before in rock/pop music. Elvis Presley had played six stadium shows in 1956 and ’57 before going into the army, but nothing even remotely close to Shea Stadium. His largest audience was just over 26,000 fans at the Cotton Bowl in Dallas. The Beatles had to more than double that number to fill Shea Stadium’s 55,600 seats. No one knew what to expect or even if they could do it. They were the biggest act in showbiz and their concerts were sell-outs, but they were mostly in smaller sports arenas for 10,000 to 15,000 fans. In England they were still playing large theaters. So promoters knew more tickets could have been sold for almost every show, but filling a major league baseball stadium was unheard of.And you had the generation gap in full swing back in ’65 – as it was with Elvis in the 1950’s and even now with Justin Beiber, Miley Cyrus and others. You know as well as I do that it’s mostly the older generation that puts down many of today’s pop acts, and they wish these kids would fail and disappear into pop culture footnotes. It was the same with the Beatles. A lot of adults made fun of them and complained about their long hair and loud music and that they were corrupting the younger generation.[Manager Brian] Epstein’s biggest worry in making the deal with promoter Sid Bernstein [was that] empty seats could hurt their image. Bernstein only convinced him to accept the show by guaranteeing a sell-out. Whatever seats weren’t sold, Bernstein would buy himself at $10 per – almost twice the highest ticket price. After that, Epstein’s biggest worry was how to protect “his boys” from so many fans. He was afraid they wouldn’t get out of Shea alive. Again, no one had even attempted this before. It was a huge risk in 1965.”On the keen instinct and determination of promoter Sid Bernstein:“From what everyone told me, Sid Bernstein was a hard working, honest and decent guy. No one I interviewed had a bad thing to say about him. What I liked most was that he wasn’t afraid to take a chance. He would think outside of the box – know what I mean? Without getting into too much detail, he took a chance in 1963 – almost a full year before their appearance on “The Ed Sullivan Show” – and booked them for two shows at Carnegie Hall. No one in this country had even heard of The Beatles at that time – not even Ed Sullivan. He rolled the dice and hit. For that reason Brian Epstein was loyal to Sid.So when Sid approached him just after the 1964 North American tour about playing Shea Stadium, Brian listened. He wasn’t exactly sold on it for the reason mentioned earlier, but he gave Sid a chance. That’s all he needed. It’s in the book because his main obstacle was not being allowed to advertise the show before giving Epstein a deposit, which he didn’t have. But he did it and put the whole thing together. All the Beatles had to do was show up and play.”On the diverse support lineup that led up to the Beatles’ headlining set:“It was like a variety show, which was pretty standard in those days. Now opening acts are supposed to compliment the headliner is some way, but this one was a real mix. The opening act was The Discotheque Dancers. They were five girls and a guy that demonstrated popular dances like The Frug and The Watusi while The King Curtis Band played instrumental medleys of pop songs, including a couple by The Beatles. Can you believe that? Cannibal and the Headhunters sang “Land of 1,000 Dances,” and another instrumental group Epstein represented called Sounds Incorporated were on the bill. The King Curtis Band also did a set and then backed Brenda Holloway. Marvin Gaye was introduced, but didn’t perform.On the reasons why the Beatles’ set was much shorter than you’d expect:“The Beatles played for just over half an hour. Once again, no one knew what to expect, but that was pretty much the length of all their shows once Beatlemania became a scream fest. In fact, and I can’t remember who mentions this in the book, the Beatles could’ve just walked onto the field, stood there and waved for half an hour and everyone would’ve been thrilled. The fact that they played was almost like a bonus.”On the “expensive” ticket price:“[Tickets cost] $4.50, $5.00 and $5.65. You know, we laugh about that now when you have to pay a few hundred bucks to sit in the nosebleed section to see The Rolling Stones and others. But that was a big chunk of change for the average teenaged Beatles fan back in 1965. There are memories in the book about kids who couldn’t go to the concert because their parents thought it cost too much.”You can watch a few assorted video clips from the performance and the big buildup to the Beatles’ headlining set on 8/15/65 at Shea Stadium below:last_img read more

Ask the Mayor — May 6th, 2020 — Mason City mayor Bill Schickel

first_imgKGLO News · Ask the Mayor — May 6, 2020 — Mason City mayor Bill Schickel Mason City’s mayor Bill Schickel was our guest on “Ask the Mayor” on May 6th, 2020. Listen back to the program via the audio player belowlast_img

WILD DUDE RALLIES FROM OFF PACE TO TAKE GRADE II, $200,000 KONA GOLD STAKES BY ONE LENGTH OVER FAVORED SUBTLE INDIAN; BEJARANO, HOLLENDORFER TEAM FOR 6 ½ FURLONG WIN IN 1:15.10

first_img$75,000 MIZDIRECTION STAKES GOES TO ZIEBARTH HOME-BRED SO SWEETITIZ ARCADIA, Calif. (May 21, 2016)–With a lively pace to run at, Wild Dude skimmed the rail turning for home under Rafael Bejarano and overtook favored Subtle Indian in the final sixteenth of a mile to win Saturday’s Grade II, $200,000 Kona Gold Stakes by one length. Trained by Jerry Hollendorfer, Wild Dude, who broke from the rail, covered 6 ½ furlongs in 1:15.10.In a bizarre turn of events, Subtle Indian, who was riding a four-race winning streak at Oaklawn Park coming into the Kona Gold, broke sharply under regular rider Ramon Vazquez and when recent Los Angeles Stakes winner San Onofre was abruptly pulled up coming out of the seven furlong chute, Subtle Indian found himself on a lonely lead heading to the half mile pole and into the far turn. However, the field compressed approaching the quarter pole and Wild Dude, who was well back early, took command late.The third choice in the wagering in a field of eight older horses at 9-2, Wild Dude paid $11.20, $4.00 and $2.80.“We gave this horse a little time and he’s been training really well,” said Hollendorfer, who also co-owns the 6-year-old Florida-bred horse by Wildcat Heir with Green Smith, Jr. “I didn’t know if the number one post would hurt him, but he got real lucky and got through, so that was what won the race for him. He’s a real nice horse. He’s a millionaire now and we’re very proud of him.With the winner’s share of $120,000, Wild Dude’s career earnings zoomed to $1,095,232. In getting his fifth career Santa Anita win, Wild Dude improved his overall mark to 22-8-5-4.“I knew that (Subtle Indian) would go to the lead,” said Bejarano. “I thought other horses would go with him but I just took my time. I knew my horse would show me a big kick but I had to make sure by the three eighths pole that I had enough room. I let him go in the stretch, had a clean trip and my horse won.”Hammered to favoritism at 4-5, Subtle Indian fought off all challengers a quarter mile out, but couldn’t withstand the late charge of the winner and had to settle for second, a half length in front of Cautious Giant. Subtle Indian paid $2.80 and $2.40.“I think Subtle Indian ran a good race today,” said Vazquez. “He never quits and he tries really hard. I think he is better at six furlongs. Today, at six and a half, he had to go a little more. In this case, the other horse just ran better than mine.”Ridden by Santiago Gonzalez, Cautious Giant out-gamed Coastline late and finished third by a neck. Off at 14-1, Cautious Giant paid $4.20 to show.San Onofre, who was ridden by Edwin Maldonado, sustained two broken sesamoid bones in his right front ankle and had to be euthanized.Fractions on the race were 21.58, 44.37 and 1:08.76. Saturday’s co-feature, the $75,000 Mizdirection Stakes, for fillies and mares 3 and up at 6 ½ furlongs down the hillside turf course, was run immediately following the Kona Gold, as the 10th race on an 11-race card. Taken in gate to wire fashion, it was won by Pamela Ziebarth’s homebred So Sweetitiz, who won by a half length over Miss Double dOro while getting the distance in 1:13.70.Ridden by Mike Smith and trained by Marty Jones, So Sweetitiz, a 4-year-old Kentucky-bred daughter of Grand Slam, was off at 7-1 in a field of eight and paid $17.00, $7.00 and $4.20.“It’s been a process with this filly,” said Jones. “She’s had her ups and downs and she’s been real aggressive. It seems like once we got her on the turf, she started getting confident and doing things the right way. Mike rode a great race. I expected her to be up close, but with Mike you kind of just tell him what she’s like, and he takes care of the rest.”Miss Double d’Oro paid $3.60 and $2.40.Swift Lady, the 9-5 favorite, paid $2.60 to show.First post time for a 10-race card on Sunday at Santa Anita is at 2 p.m. Admission gates open at 11 a.m.last_img read more

Chelsea to outbid Man Utd to land winger – report

first_imgChelsea are ready to outbid Manchester United to land Belgian winger Eden Hazard, The Daily Telegraph report.The Blues are favourites to sign Hazard from Lille, with United said to be reluctant to pay the £35m asking price. Manchester City, who have also shown an interest, apparently have reservations about his wage demands.Hazard is expected to announce his future following Belgium’s friendly against England at Wembley next week.The Sun report Brazilian club Sao Paulo’s claim that Chelsea have made a £23m bid for 19-year-old midfielder Lucas Moura.The player’s adviser Wagner Ribeiro said: “He has the perfect profile to play in Europe. He’s a good player and knows how to shoot.”Meanwhile. QPR boss Mark Hughes wants Manchester City midfielder Nigel de Jong and Blackburn goalkeeper Paul Robinson, according to reports.Hughes was City’s manager when they signed De Jong, who is entering the final year of his contract at Eastlands.The Dutchman was only a substitute for his team’s last four matches of the season, which the Daily Mirror say has alerted Rangers to his possible availability.And the Daily Mail say Rangers and West Ham both want Robinson, who is tipped to leave Blackburn following their relegation.Follow West London Sport on TwitterFind us on Facebooklast_img read more

Genes Attack the Trees

first_imgEvolutionary tree-building (11/14/2005) is a tangled business.  Now that scientists can compare genomes of diverse animals, they can compare the resulting molecular evolutionary trees with traditional ones – those produced by inferring relationships based on outward (morphological) characteristics of living or fossil organisms.  What happens when the trees don’t match?    Two recent studies, both reported by Science Daily, have demonstrated that molecular-based trees, to be believed, require uprooting long-standing morphologically-based evolutionary trees.Iguanas Promoted:  A “radical reorganization” of the tree of reptiles was reported by Science Daily based on work by two Penn State biologists.  Iguanas, for instance, had long been placed near the bottom of the tree due to their “primitive” appearance.  Now, the molecular tree graduates them to the top.  The new study compared 19 genomes from all the major reptile lineages.  So many anomalies were found, the researchers had to invent entirely new categories of classification.  In addition, most of the branches appeared to start early and remain relatively unchanged over vast periods of time.  Toxic venom, for example, was thought to be a recent innovation, but now appears rooted at the time of the earliest dinosaurs.  Reptiles with two egg teeth appear to precede those with one egg tooth – a step toward simplicity, not complexity.  These and other findings are inverting a family tree of reptiles accepted by evolutionary biologists for over a century.  One of the team members said, “If this new tree is correct, all the morphological characters that traditionally have been used to identify similarities between species will need to be reevaluated to understand how these traits evolved” (emphasis added in all quotes).Slow Humans:  Another startling finding reported in Science Daily started with the title, “Early Animals Had Human-Like Genes.”  If humans are the late-comers, why and how did early-Cambrian roundworms produce innovations that would persist unchanged for hundreds of millions of years?  The team compared human and fruit-fly introns with those of a roundworm thought to be 600 million years old, close to the period of the very first multicellular organisms.  Contrary to earlier expectations, introns – those spacers in the DNA cut out by the transcription machinery – were already present in the worms and have persisted all the way to the human line, while other branches, like insects, lost many of them quickly.  To save the evolutionary tree, researchers are speaking of “fast-evolving” and “slow-evolving” branches.  “The worm’s genes are very similar to human genes,” said one.  “That’s a much different picture than we’ve seen from the quickly-evolving species that have been studied so far.”  Another remarked, “Now we have direct evidence that genes were already quite complex in the first animals, and many invertebrates have reduced part of this complexity.”  Not only were the introns the same, but their positions within the genome “have been preserved over the last half a billion years.”Overall, the picture looks opposite what evolutionary biologists have expected: “this has shown us is that evolution is not always about gain; the loss of complexity can equally be an important player in evolution.”What’s most amazing about both these stories is not the genes.  It is the psychology of Darwinists.  They can hang on to a theory no matter how much contrary evidence comes to light.  Invented terms like “conserved genes” and “slow-evolving species” mask their desperation.  They are clinging to a dogmatic evolutionary position in spite of evidence that looks like creation: abrupt appearance, stasis, and loss of original complexity.  Simultaneously, they accuse creationists of accepting their view on “faith” while bluffing that “there is no controversy among scientists about evolution.”  Yet how would an impartial jury rule, based on the empirical evidence alone, with no evolutionary presuppositions?(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

SA words spice up OED

first_img7 October 2002What South African words would you include in an English dictionary designed for the region?There are words one hears every day in South Africa: ubuntu, for example, that Nguni word meaning humanity. There are lekgotla (Sesotho) and bosberaad (Afrikaans) – both strategy planning sessions, usually called by government or organisations.Some South African words have entered world usage – “fundi’, from the isiNdebele umfundi (an expert, a teacher) and “trek’, from South African Dutch (a long or arduous journey). Others, perhaps, deserve elevation into “World English’: babelaas (hung-over), from the isiZulu ibhabhalazi; and for those who get themselves into that state, dof, or stupid, from Afrikaans.The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary is the newest in a range of regional dictionaries – there are Canadian, Australian and Indian editions – and the editors had some difficult choices to make. They settled on 1 500 examples of South African English, including words specific to the country as well as those which have meanings in South Africa different from their definitions overseas.“Madam’, for example, might be “a polite form of address for a woman’ elsewhere, but here it’s “the mistress of a household, usually a white woman’, or “an affluent urban white woman’. A “bond’ in South Africa is a “mortgage’ in the US and the UK. And perhaps the best-known example: a South African “robot’ is not a steel-plated humanoid but a traffic light.Less known, but also important, is the use of the comma in figures. The second, South African usage entry under “comma’ is “a mark representing a decimal comma: two comma five metres’ – presumably where many other countries would say “point’.Choices were made by The Dictionary Unit for South African English, a not-for-profit unit affiliated to Rhodes University in Grahamstown and financed partly by the Pan South African Language Board, established by the South African Constitution to promote the country’s 11 official languages as well as other languages used in the country.The unit had a head start: set up in the 1960s by linguistic academics Jean and William Branford, it could rely on their 1978 Dictionary of South African English and the unit’s massive 1996 Dictionary of South African English on Historical Principles.The new dictionary is intended, say the publishers, for the average adult, the student and the professional. It veers from politics (Nepad, Black Consciousness, Gear) to food and drink (witblits, mebos, skottel) to agriculture – or, anyway, a particular crop. “Ganja’ was there already (origin: from Hindi gamja), but the South African edition has added dagga (origin: from Khoikhoi dachab) and “Durban poison’ (cannabis of a particularly potent variety, originating in KwaZulu-Natal, or so says the dictionary).The preference for Mandrax among South African substance abusers – more than in any other country – is also reflected in the dictionary, with one of the definitions of “button’ being “South African informal: a Mandrax tablet’.There is a nod to youth culture, or at least its music. There is nothing especially South African about hip hop (it is, says the dictionary, of US black and Hispanic origin) or rap (of US origin) or kwasa kwasa (“a lively erotic dance originating in central Africa’ as well as “a genre of popular African music’).But kwaito is distinctly home-grown. It is defined as “a style of popular dance music featuring rhythmically recited vocals over an instrumental backing with strong bass lines’. So now you know – and the origin of the name, if not the style, goes deep into Johannesburg culture. “Kwaito’, says the dictionary, comes from the Amakwaito, a group of 1950s gangsters in Sophiatown – and they, in turn, derived their name from an Afrikaans word for angry or vicious: kwaai.Traditional South African culture is highlighted in the new dictionary, with many words from official languages, especially Nguni, included. An imbizo – traditionally “a gathering called by a traditional leader’ but also “a meeting or workshop’ – comes from the isiZulu biza, “call, summon’.Makoti is in (“a young married woman, a bride’, from isiZulu), and indoda (“a man, especially one who has undergone traditional initiation’, from isiXhosa and isiZulu). So are imbongi (a praise singer) and inyanga (“a traditional healer who uses herbal remedies. Compare with sangoma’), as well as sangoma (“a traditional healer or diviner, from isangoma‘).And traditional culture of a different kind is included as well, with many words from Afrikaans, among them deurmekaar (“confused, disorganised’ – like many words, rather more evocative in original than in translation), boeremusiek and boerekos, and everybody’s favourite, lekker, which the dictionary helpfully defines as “tipsy’ as well as “good’ and “pleasant’.Anyone seeking an illustration of the interweaving and interdependency of different South African cultures need look no further than the language.Tsotsitaal, for example, is “an Afrikaans-influenced township patois . typically spoken in Gauteng. Origin from tsotsi + Afrikaans taal ‘language”). And the word tsotsi? It’s “a black urban criminal’, says the entry, and its origin is “perhaps a Sesotho corruption of zoot suit, with reference to the flashy clothes originally associated with tsotsis’. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Global airline profits to fall in 2017 as oil costs rise

first_imgThe International Air Transport Association is predicting global airline profits will fall 16 per cent next year amid higher oil prices and slower global traffic growth.Next year will also see almost 4 billion travellers to take to the air and 55.7 million tonnes of cargo transported as the industry accounts for almost 1 per cent of global GDP. An IATA global forecast released on Thursday predicts 2017  will see global profits slide to  $US29.8 billion, or $US7.54 per passenger,  after reaching a cyclical peak this year of $US35.6 billion.It also lowered its 2016 profit estimates from a June estimate of $US39.4 billion due to lower global GDP growth and rising costs., although they remain slightly ahead of 2015’s figure of $US35.3 billion. Nonetheless, this was still the highest absolute profit generated by the airline industry and the highest net profit margin of 5.1 per cent.IATA director general Alexandre de Juniac said the industry continued to deliver strong results, although what were record profits for airlines were considered normal for most other businesses.“Even though conditions in 2017 will be more difficult with rising oil prices, we see the industry earning $29.8 billion,’’ de Juniac said. “That’s a very soft landing and safely in profitable territory. These three years are the best performance in the industry’s history—irrespective of the many uncertainties we face. Indeed, risks are abundant— political, economic and security among them.’’Next year’s profit is expected to be hit by a rise in oil prices from an average this year of  $US44.60 a barrel to $US55. This will push up jet fuel prices from $US52.10 per barrel to $US64.90.IATA’s forecast noted that while this will account for almost 19 per cent of the industry’s cost structure next year,  it will still be less than the average of 33.2 per cent in 2012-13. One impact of the higher prices will be a slowing in traffic growth from 5.9 per cent this year to 5.1 per cent next year.  Although capacity growth will also slow, industry load factors are expected to fall from 80.2 percent this year to 79.8 per cent.“The negative impact of a lower load factor is expected to be offset somewhat by a strengthening of global economic growth, ‘’ IATA said in its analysis. “ World GDP is projected to expand by 2.5 per cent in 2017 (up from 2.2 per cent in 2016).“Along with structural changes in the industry, this is expected to help stabilize yields for both the cargo and passenger businesses. This is a welcome development as yields (calculated in dollar terms) have fallen each year since 2012.’’Industry consolidation means North American carriers are expected to remain the most profitable with net profits of $US18.1 billion, down from $US20.3 billion this year. They will also have the strongest net margin of 8.5 per cent and the highest average profit per passenger of $US19.58. Capacity next year is expected to grow by 2.6 percent compared to demand growth of 2.5 per cent.European carriers will see a significant fall in aggregate net profit from $US7.5 billion this year to $US5.6 billion next year, the equivalent of $US5.65 per passenger. Capacity growth of 4.3 per cent will outstrip demand growth of 4 per cent in a region IATA characterised as being  subject to intense competition “hampered by high costs, onerous regulation and high taxes’’.The association also noted that terrorist threats remained a real risk despite returning confidence after recent incidents.In the Asia- Pacific, carriers were expected generate a net profit of $US6.3 billion next year, down from $US7.3 billion, with per passenger profits at $US4.44. Capacity was expected to jump 7.6 per cent and outstrip a 7 per cent growth in demand.“Improved cargo performance is expected to offset rising fuel prices for many of the region’s airlines,’’ the analysis said. “The expansion of new model airlines and progressive liberalization in the region is intensifying already strong competition. In addition, profitability varies widely across the region.’’The forecast for the Middle East came with a warning that the region’s rapidly expanding carriers face threats in the new year that included rising airport charges and growing air traffic control delays.The  carriers were expected to make a net profit of $US300 million, down from $US900 million.“Average yields for the region’s carriers are low but unit costs are even lower, partly driven by the strong capacity expansion, forecast at 10.1 per cent …. ahead of expected demand growth of 9.0 per cent,’’ IATA said.Profit per passenger in Latin America is tipped to be less than $1 as the region’s carrier post a net profit $US200 million, down from $300 million this year. Capacity is expected to grow at 4.8 per cent ahead of demand growth of 4 per cent.“Despite some signs of improvement in the region’s currencies and economic prospects, operating conditions remain challenging, with infrastructure deficiencies, high taxes, and a growing regulatory burden across the continent,’’ IATA said.Regional conflict and low  commodity prices will again see African carriers make an overall loss of $9.97 per passenger or $US800 million. Capacity in 2017 is expected to grow by 4.7 per cent,  ahead of a 4.5 per cent growth in demand.last_img read more

How To Keep People From Waiting Out Your Transformation

first_imgYou are leading a transformation. What you are doing is critical to the future of your organization. It’s strategic. You can’t afford to fail.You built the burning platform and you made the case for change. You sold that change with a massive meeting, and you threw down the gauntlet.Week one: Everyone is on board, excited, and taking action. You are implementing, executing, and gathering feedback. You are sharing the results. Things are moving a long nicely.Week two: Mostly everyone is still on board and taking some action. Some of them are implementing, and some are struggling with the new actions. Those that are struggling are asking questions–and they’re questioning whether or not they can do what is being asked of them. Your leadership team keeps pushing forward.Week three: A lot of people are still on board, but they’ve gotten busy. They are too busy to focus on the new initiative, and they start slipping back into their old habits, the habits and activities that you are trying to kill. Your leadership team keeps pushing forward, but it’s hard to hold back the flood of problems, challenges, and backsliders.Week four: The leadership team starts to give up the ghost. They start backsliding. You’ve let up a bit, and you accept that they really are busy. You start to give them more room. You let them off the hook. The initiative teeters on the brink.Maybe I have the timeline wrong. Maybe it’s not 4 weeks. Let’s say it’s 12 weeks. Or 16 weeks if you like that better. It changes nothing; this is how initiatives die. Here’s what to do about it.Hold Them Accountable: If you are going to push your initiative over the line, you are going to have to hold everyone in the organization accountable for the changes. This includes the leadership team, as well as all of the individuals they lead.Put Change First on the Agenda: Begin every conversation and every meeting with an update on the status of the changes being made. By putting the change initiative first, you demonstrate its importance. And you prove that you are never going away or giving up.Appoint a Task Force: Find the true believers, the proselytizers, the fire-breathers and appoint them to a task force. Give them responsibilities for identifying those who are struggling to make change with the directive to help them–at any cost.Identify and Resell the Holdouts: There are many who will try to wait you out. They’re smart, too. They’ve seen enough initiatives die in the past, they’ve been trained to wait you out. Identify them. Single them out. Isolate them and sell them individually on the importance of your initiative. Ask them to personally support you and to act as leaders.If you give people space, they will wait you out. If you aren’t serious about your transformation, if you dabble around the edges, you will lose to the great pull and the irresistible allure of the status quo.last_img read more

Steve Jobs & Guy Kawasaki — Powerpoint Best Practices

first_img Originally published Jan 18, 2007 1:27:00 PM, updated July 28 2017 Topics: Don’t forget to share this post! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to Email AppEmail AppShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to MessengerMessengerShare to SlackSlack Presentations I have recently come across some interesting Powerpoint best practices that I thought I would share with you. Steve JobsThe first best practice was from watching Steve Jobs’ presentation at MacWorld this year.  What was fascinating about his slides is that they were either just a picture or just a picture with a couple of words in extremely large font.  It turns out that Steve wants the audience to listen to him tell the story, rather than read the slides. Here’s a picture of one of Steve’s slides:In contrast to Steve’s slide show, here’s a picture of a slide from Michael Dell.  Michael’s would work well if it were designed to be sent to someone who would not have the benefit of hearing the story live, but next to Steve’s slides, they just seem cluttered.Guy KawasakiI recently read Guy Kawasaki’s “Art of The Start.”  In addition to being a good author/blogger, Guy was one of the very early Apple employees and more recently has been a venture/angel investor type where he has listened to countless Powerpoint presentations.  Presumably because he is tired of seeing poor Powerpoint presentations, he spends many pages in his book talking about Powerpoint best practices.  There were a few nuggets of Powerpoint wisdom among a lot of content about it that stuck with me a few days after finishing the book.His mantra is that Powerpoint should follow a 10/20/30 Rule.  There should be no more than 10 slides in the presentation — very few people take away much more than one concept from a presentation, so all that other stuff is extra.  The slide presentation should be designed to last 20 minutes, leaving room for ample questions/discussion between slides or after the presentation.  Guy points out that the point of the presentation is typically to initiate a discussion.  He says the font should be size should be no smaller than 30 (Arial font).  Guy says that audiences read faster than you can talk, so that while you are up there talking, they are trying to read your slides and not listening to what you are saying.He says that there are something like 60 animation features within Powerpoint and he recommends the less use of it the better.  His advice is to use your voice/body to emphasize when a point is important, not some fancy Powerpoint trick.  The only place he recommends using any of this is in going through bullet points on a slide, presumably to avoid having people read ahead.  Speaking of bullets, Guy suggests that bulleted slides should have one point with bullets and only one layer of bullets (lest you violate the 30 part of 10/20/30).If you have some great Powerpoint tips, please do share them with us…– Brian Halligan.last_img read more