Charity sector’s use of direct mail up by 9%

first_img Howard Lake | 20 March 2007 | News The Royal Mail reports that the charity sector’s use of direct mail has increased by 9.1 per cent in a year. In the last quarter of 2006 UK charities sent 132.27 million mailings compared to 121.22 million in the same period in 2005.The Royal Mail says that these results support the findings of research it conducted in association with Carat Insight which showed that “post also remains the preferred method of sending donations, despite the rising popularity of online donating sites”.Royal Mail’s latest research also revealed a rise in the volume of direct mail sent to the 55-64 year old age group. The Royal Mail say that this demographic “is also recognised as being the most generous and regular donors”. Advertisement Tagged with: Individual giving Research / statistics AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  18 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThiscenter_img About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Charity sector’s use of direct mail up by 9% Emily Travis, Market Development Manager of Royal Mail, said: “The charity sector has long recognised the benefits of direct mail and these figures reinforce its importance to them as a marketing tool. Direct mail successfully enables charities to develop a personal relationship with existing supporters but also deliver comprehensive details of their cause to increasingly discerning new donors.”Overall direct mail volumes during October to December 2006 experienced a slight fall with 958.69 million items sent compared with one billion mail pieces during the same period in 2005. However, other sectors that increased their use of direct mail include building societies with a year on year volume increase of 18.8% to 15.92 million items; government, which jumped by 6% for the same period to 17.47 million; and health which increased by 5.7% to 13.65 million.last_img read more

Woman editor gets a year in prison for article about ethnic discrimination

first_imgNews RwandaAfrica Organisation April 20, 2007 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Woman editor gets a year in prison for article about ethnic discrimination RSF_en November 27, 2020 Find out more RwandaAfrica News The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa Help by sharing this information April 6, 2020 Find out morecenter_img Receive email alerts Reporters Without Borders today condemned the one-year prison sentence imposed by a Kigali court on 20 April on Agnès Nkusi Uwimana, the editor of the fortnightly Umurabyo, after she pleaded guilty to charges of “creating divisions,” “sectarianism” and “defamation.”Uwimana had been held since 12 January for writing a column headlined “You have problems if you kill a Tutsi, but you go free if you kill a Hutu.” She recognised in court “the gravity of my writings” and promised to “publish a correction.”Her lawyer said she recognised that her article could have up upset some people and she asked them to forgive her. He said she also requested “the clemency of the Rwandan courts” and “a reduction of penalties to be imposed on her.”The judge said he would take account of Uwimana’s confession and halve the penalty. As well as a year in prison, he sentenced her to pay a fine of 400,000 Rwandan francs (560 euros) and damages of 2.8 million Rwandan francs (3.900 euros).The prosecutor initially requested a prison sentence of five years, six months and eight days. Uwimana and her lawyer have not yet decided whether they will appeal.———–19.01.2007 – Judge orders 30 days of pretrial custody for newspaper editorReporters Without Borders today condemned a Kigali judge’s decision on 19 January to place Agnès Uwimana Nkusi, the editor of the privately-owned fortnightly Umurabyo, in custody for 30 days while she awaits trial on charges of “promoting divisions,” sectarianism and libel.“Given that the charges are so political and vague, the court issued an unfair decision and rode roughshod over the principle of a presumption of innocence,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Even if Nkusi acknowledged that her article may have had a negative impact and offered to publish a correction, the judge has sided with the authorities and supported their evident desire to eliminate one of Rwanda’s very few independent newspapers. If this case is to be handled fairly, Nkusi must be freed.”The 30-day detention order was issued by the judge of the Nyarugenge local court in Kigali at the state prosecutor’s request on the grounds that Nkusi represented a threat to the country’s security. The court thereby gave prosecutors more time to prepare the case against her, which was prompted by an article in issue No. 10 of Umurabyo and a letter published in issue No. 11.Nkusi recognised during the 19 January hearing that the column she wrote headlined “You have problems if you kill a Tutsi, but you go free if you kill a Hutu” could have had “a bad impact” and she undertook to write another column correcting the position she took. As regards the letter addressed to Rwanda’s independent journalists that was published in issue No. 11, she explained that it was sent to several news media but only hers chose to publish it.——————————-15.01.2007 – Newspaper editor arrested for criticising press freedom violationsReporters Without Borders today called for the release of Agnès Uwimana Nkusi, the editor of the privately-owned bimonthly Umurabyo, who has been held at the Muhima district police station in Kigali since 12 January for publishing an open letter condemning press freedom violations.“The government cannot dispute claims that it does not tolerate criticism and at the same time systematically target the independent press with all the tools placed at its disposal by draconian legislation,” Reporters Without Borders said. “In a democracy, it is not the job of the police to regulate the media. This should be done by independent bodies that everyone respects.”Arrested by police on the orders of the Nyarugenge prosecutor’s office on charges of “sectarianism” and “discrimination,” Nkusi was interrogated by the deputy prosecutor about an open letter to independent journalists on the subject of press freedom violations, which she published in issue No. 11 of Umurabyo. The police said the authorities intended to arrest her sources and bring the same charges against them. Nkusi is due to appear tomorrow before a judge, who will decide whether she remains in detention.Umurabyo is one of the very few Kigali-based publications that criticise the government. There was already controversy over an article in the preceding issue headlined: “You have problems if you kill a Tutsi, but you go free if you kill a Hutu.” The High Council of the Press, a regulatory body controlled by the government, ruled that Umurabyo should be suspended for three months because of the article. To take effect, the decision needed to be confirmed by the information ministry. This was still pending when Nkusi was arrested. News to go further Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent Follow the news on Rwanda Reports BBC Africa’s “disproportionate and dangerous” dismissal of a journalist February 13, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more