Radio journalist who “annoyed politicians” murdered in Bahia state

first_img Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls on the Brazilian authorities to conduct a thorough investigation into yesterday’s murder of Marlon Carvalho, a radio station presenter and reporter in the northeastern state of Bahia, and to focus on the hypothesis that he was killed in connection with his journalism. RSF_en BrazilAmericas Condemning abuses CorruptionViolence The third radio presenter to be murdered this year in Brazil, the 37-year-old Carvalho was shot dead in his home in the small town of Riachão do Jacuípe in the early hours of 16 August. RSF begins research into mechanisms for protecting journalists in Latin America “The authorities must conduct an exhaustive investigation into Marlon Carvalho’s murder taking account above all of the possibility that he was killed in connection with his work,” said Emmanuel Colombié, the head of RSF’s Latin America bureau. Reports Alarm after two journalists murdered in Brazil August 17, 2018 Radio journalist who “annoyed politicians” murdered in Bahia state BrazilAmericas Condemning abuses CorruptionViolence News The two other radio show hosts to have been killed this year in Brazil were Jefferson Pureza on 17 January and Jairo Sousa on 21 June. Both had received repeated threats. Another radio show host, Hamilton Alves, miraculously survived despite being hit several times when six shots were fired at this car in Rondônia state on 20 April. Follow the news on Brazil Organisation News May 13, 2021 Find out more “Outside the major cities, journalists – and radio show hosts in particular – are systematically the victims of threats and reprisals when they tackle subjects linked to local politics and corruption. We deplore their appalling vulnerability and call on the Brazilian authorities to provide journalists with better protection.” News April 15, 2021 Find out more An outspoken critic of local officials, Carvalho worked for two radio stations, Gazeta and Jacuípe. He also posted daily videos on his Facebook page about alleged cases of corruption and collusion between local officials and criminal groups. A friend described him as a popular and controversial person who “annoyed a lot of politicians.” Brazil is ranked 102nd out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2018 World Press Freedom Index. The local police said that, according to their initial findings, four gunmen entered his home, shot him and then left. They appear not to have taken any of his journalistic material or equipment or any other object with them. Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts to go further 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies April 27, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Connective Behaviors that Spur Innovation

first_imgLeaders aspire to build ever more nimble and responsive businesses while seeking a competitive advantage in a global economy. Today’s successful leaders must not only be strategic thinkers, but innovators as well. And the successful leaders of tomorrow must be able to drive organizational innovation by tapping into the knowledge and creativity of their teams. Innovation is often the key driver of an organization’s growth and performance. It can be the single best way for a company to differentiate itself from competitors. How can we help foster a culture of collaboration and creativity to help drive growth and success? Fostering connectivity, first and foremost amongst other things, promotes creativity and spurs innovation.More than ever before, we have the ability to share our ideas and encourage a discussion around them, unconstrained by time, physical borders or distance. We live in a connected world. Connectivity is about having the practical means to connect with others; but it is also about having the connections we need to enable and encourage innovation. Connectivity increases exposure to new opportunities, new ideas, and to feedback. Communities of corporate innovation are connected to every facet of business from product development, customer engagement, marketing programs, to employee development. Empowered workers care more about developing high-performing cultures that drive customer value over time.As the founder of EMC’s West Coast Women’s Leadership Forum (WCWLF), my vision was to make EMC the center of Leadership and Innovation through the eyes of women. Our programs follow this theme and are delivered to internal and external audiences of men and women often in partnership with nonprofits, universities and other corporations. In 2012, we delivered more than 50 programs, making EMC’s WCWLF one of the most diverse and interesting venues with a rich community of attendees. Looking to further our influence and reach, we developed a new Leadership and Innovation in the Executive Suite speaker series. The program brings leaders and innovators with different points of view to EMC and creates a community to inspire leadership through the voice of innovators, showcase thought leadership, and establish new partnerships while building connective behaviors that spur innovation. To increase our impact, we partnered with digital book publisher Vook to create an eBook, commemorating the program while expanding our reach. “Connective Behaviors That Spur Innovation” was released in March and has since inspired a global community of thought leaders to share their perspectives. Jeremy Burton, Executive Vice President, Product Operations and Marketing was the program’s host and keynote speaker.At EMC World I will once again be working with Vook to commemorate EMC Women in Technology through the Women of the World program called “Boost Your Credibility – Hidden Behavioral Cues,” scheduled for May 8th, 2013. More than 50 largely hidden behavioral and contextual cues have been discovered that deeply affect how others respond to you. Cues cover situations as diverse as setting, female/male differences, sounds, and the sequence of “scenes” we experience. Keynote speaker Kare Anderson, a Forbes Columnist and expert on quoteability and connective behaviors will be joined by Helene Barnekow, EMC Senior Vice President, Worldwide Field & Channel Marketing and Bill Teuber, EMC Vice Chairman. The eBook planned release date is scheduled for July 2013.last_img read more

Iceberg Headed for Sub-Antarctic Island Could Threaten Wildlife

first_img– Advertisement – It’s unpredictable what could happen if the iceberg were to run aground near South Georgia, said M Jackson, a glaciologist who is an explorer with the National Geographic Society. Such episodes are not unheard-of but greater attention is usually given to them when they pose a threat to people and wildlife, she said.- Advertisement – An iceberg roughly the size of Delaware that is headed toward the sub-Antarctic island of South Georgia has experts worried about the possibility of it blocking wildlife from food sources and threatening the island’s ecosystem.The iceberg, known as A68a, was about 400 kilometers, or about 250 miles, away from the coast of the British island territory of South Georgia as of Wednesday, the British Antarctic Survey said.- Advertisement – There is a chance that if A68a does run aground, it could disrupt part of South Georgia’s ecosystem, affecting some of the areas and paths that animals, such as seals and penguins, travel to hunt and gather food.“Essentially, seals and penguins birth on land, then commute back and forth into the ocean to source and return with food to feed their young,” Dr. Jackson said. “The iceberg might disrupt this, and seals and penguins might not be able to source and deliver food to their land-based pups and chicks, potentially triggering widespread starvation.”Douglas R. MacAyeal, a professor of geophysical sciences at the University of Chicago who has studied the behavior of large icebergs, compared A68a with another large iceberg, B-15A. In the 2000s, B-15A struck parts of Ross Island in the Ross Sea as well as the other icebergs surrounding it, disturbing the island’s penguin colonies. Some colonies went years without hatching chicks. The disturbance led to some penguins interbreeding with those from different colonies.“This led to a genetic benefit of exchange, of genetic material from different, normally isolated, cohorts,” Dr. MacAyeal said in an email. “In my view: If A68a were to encounter the island itself or the shoals around it, it would be spectacular for a few days but would not lead to an ecosystem catastrophe.”Some experts predict A68a will eventually break into large pieces as a result of strong currents.“The Southern Ocean around South Georgia is an utterly wild place with strong currents and sea-swell that will ‘flex’ the iceberg on top of the grounding point, causing it to stress and fracture much like a ship,” Dr. MacAyeal said.If the iceberg does break close to the island’s coast, there’s the potential that it could displace large amounts of seawater “that can inundate coastal communities,” Dr. Jackson said.This kind of hazard is something experts have had to grapple with as climate change has led to ice melting and ice systems breaking at significant rates.“I am doubtful given the increasing rate of ice melt worldwide that this is the last time we’ll see this,” Dr. Jackson said. “I wouldn’t be surprised in the years to come if we continue to see bigger icebergs presenting bigger hazards to communities of people and wildlife alike.”center_img The iceberg broke off from the Antarctic Peninsula in 2017 and is about 100 miles long and 30 miles wide. The trajectory of the iceberg could change and steer clear of the island, because it’s in the strongest ocean current where waters are not impeded by continents. This means the iceberg could easily sail past the island, all depending on the course nature takes. – Advertisement – The iceberg may run aground near the island and be a few weeks out from the island’s coast, said Andrew Fleming, a remote sensing manager with the survey.last_img read more