HR Answers: Job hopping

first_imgA majority of younger workers see the upside of frequent employment changes and many plan to look this year.Job hopping may be losing its bad reputation, at least among the youngest generation of U.S. workers, an Accountemps survey suggests. Fifty-seven percent of employees between the ages of 18 and 34 said changing jobs every few years can actually help their career, compared to 38 percent of professionals between the ages of 35 and 54 and 22 percent of those age 55 or older.There were also differences by gender, with 47 percent of men and 37 percent of women reporting that job hopping is beneficial.Workers were asked, “Do you think job hopping (leaving your current employer for a new job every few years) can benefit your career?” Their responses: “Conventional wisdom about the perils of job hopping has begun to shift, but professionals still need to look carefully before they leap,” says Bill Driscoll, a district president with Accountemps. “Changing jobs every three to four years is one thing; more frequent moves could indicate the inability to dig into a role and put employers on guard.”Driscoll adds, “Professionals considering job moves should evaluate not only salary but also where they will have the greatest opportunity to build skills and advance their careers.” continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

STABLE NOTES BY ED GOLDEN – FRIDAY FEBRUARY 5, 2016

first_imgPhilip D’Amato5814111124%62%$834,810 Edwin Maldonado85138915%35%$528,540 Joseph Talamo10413151413%40%$644,654 FRESH START FOR KOBE’S BACK IN BLINKERS?Kobe’s Back, who gets out of the gate slower than a Sumo wrestler, will wear blinkers for the first time in 17 career starts when he runs in Sunday’s Grade II Palos Verdes Stakes for older horses at six furlongs.“He deserved a little freshening,” trainer Peter Eurton said in explaining why the five-year-old gray son of Flatter has not raced since finishing seventh of 14 in the Breeders’ Cup Sprint at Keeneland Oct. 31. “That’s the only reason he got the time off.“He’s not a nervous horse in the gate; he just gets pretty complacent. I hope the blinkers will help Sunday. This will be the first time he’s worn them in a race, but he’s had them on for every work since the Breeders’ Cup, in fact, almost every day in his training.“He does seem to be on the bridle more and getting underneath himself better. His works have been stronger, he’s showing more desire and interest, so we’ll see.“I may say after the race that it’s something I should have done sooner. Let’s hope so.”Owned by the C R K Stable of Lee and Susan Searing, Kobe’s Back won the Grade II San Vicente Stakes in 2014 and the Grade III Commonwealth last April, in addition to a maiden victory. He has earned $652,250.The Palos Verdes, race six of eight: Kobe’s Back, Gary Stevens, 5-2; Salutos Amigos, Rafael Bejarano, 2-1; Mystery Train, Tyler Baze, 12-1; Pulling G’s, Victor Espinoza, 7-2; Rocket Heat, Edwin Maldonado, 9-2; and Cautious Giant, Santiago Gonzalez, 4-1. JockeyMts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won Peter Eurton40611615%58%$372,520 Drayden Van Dyke6777910%34%$431,329 LUCKY SEVEN POST IN LEWIS FOR UNCLE LINO?Both trainer and jockey are pleased with the draw for Uncle Lino in Saturday’s Grade III Robert B. Lewis Stakes for three-year-olds at 1 1/16 miles.“If I had to pick a post position, that would be it: seven of seven,” said Gary Sherlock, trainer of the son of Uncle Mo who tries two turns for the first time.“Hopefully he’ll lay off some of the speed and put in a good finish.”Added jockey Fernando Perez, who has ridden Uncle Lino in each of his three previous races, resulting in a maiden win and two photo-finish losses, a second and a third, each by a neck: “I don’t think he’ll be too wide with seven horses. I think it’s a good post position.”The Lewis: Let’s Meet in Rio, Kent Desormeaux, 6-1; I Will Score, Mike Smith, 5-2; Dressed in Hermes, Rafael Bejarano, 6-1; Laoban, Tyler Baze, 12-1; Mor Spirit, Gary Stevens, 8-5; Path of David, Joe Talamo, 8-1; and Uncle Lino, Fernando Perez, 5-1. Peter Miller6293715%31%$333,040 John Sadler3956313%36%$246,810 Kent Desormeaux4479516%48%$619,745 STREET FANCY TAKES ON CHAMP SONGBIRD SATURDAYIMPERATIVE THE NEW CHOICE IN SAN ANTONIO STAKESOUTSIDE POST GOOD FOR UNCLE LINO IN ROBERT LEWISMcANALLY SEEKS TO ADD TO HIS SANTA ANITA RECORDBLINKERS BETTER LATE THAN NEVER FOR KOBE’S BACK?DAVID C. LOPEZ IMPRESSES HORSEMEN AT SANTA ANITACHAMP NYQUIST TO WORK BEFORE FIRST RACE SUNDAY David Lopez891881520%46%$535,176 Agapito Delgadillo4265614%40%$162,942 Steven Miyadi3057517%57%$178,744 Jeff Bonde1952326%53%$121,360 Rafael Bejarano1042323922%53%$1,114,785 Fernando Perez891051611%35%$489,844 Mike Smith4863613%31%$537,385 Doug O’Neill7711121314%47%$493,362 Jerry Hollendorfer6766119%34%$378,911 TrainerSts1st2nd3rdWin%ITM%Money Won ‘HAPPY’ IMPERATIVE SET FOR SAN ANTONIOWith Dortmund abstaining from Saturday’s San Antonio Stakes, chances for the opposition improved dramatically, specifically in the case of Imperative, who was made the 5-2 morning line favorite in the Grade II race at 1 1/8 miles with $500,000 in purse money.“The absence of Dortmund certainly should help a little bit, but my horse is doing good,” said Richard Baltas, trainer of Imperative, who was a game second to 2014 Horse of the Year California Chrome in the San Pasqual Stakes on Jan. 9.“We’re not going to be that far off (the pace). He was closer last time. The horse is happy. I’m looking forward to the race.”The field for the San Antonio, race seven: Cat Burglar, Rafael Bejarano, 4-1; Donworth, Mario Gutierrez, 6-1; Cyrus Alexander, Martin Garcia, 6-1; Hard Aces, Joe Talamo, 10-1; Hoppertunity, Flavien Prat, 3-1; Blingo, Alex Solis, 20-1; Imperative, Mike Smith, 5-2; and El Kabeir, Gary Stevens, 6-1. McANALLY HOPES TO ADD TO LONGEVITY MARK IN SAN MARCOSRon McAnally has been at Santa Anita since 1948. He ranks fourth all-time in victories at The Great Race Place with 703, behind Bobby Frankel, 917, Charlie Whittingham, 869, and Bob Baffert, 751.McAnally also is fourth in stakes victories with 113, and hopes to add to that number Saturday when he sends out Quick Casablanca in the Grade II San Marcos Stakes for older horses at 1 ¼ miles on turf.“I’ve been here all my life,” said McAnally, who turns 84 on July 11. “The most dramatic change? Off-track betting. It hurt the live crowds, although originally they said the satellites would be 50 miles from here. Now it’s 20, at Pomona.“But my horse is doing well. He should like the distance. He doesn’t want to go a mile. He wants a mile-and-a-quarter, a mile-and-a-half. He won at a mile-and-half in Chile.”The San Marcos: Gaga A, Mario Gutierrez, 10-1; Class Leader, Kent Desormeaux, 10-1; Chiropractor, Drayden Van Dyke, 4-1; Southern Freedom, Martin Garcia, 12-1; Power Foot, Tiago Pereira, 15-1; Ganesh, Flavien Prat, 15-1; Flamboyant, Brice Blanc, 4-1; Hay Dude, David C. Lopez, 5-2; Abbey Vale, Rafael Bejarano, 8-1; Quick Casablanca, Tyler Baze, 15-1; and Big Cazanova, Santiago Gonzalez, 15-1. Richard Baltas4976314%33%$477,594 Flavien Prat1011791517%41%$849,968 SANTA ANITA STATISTICS Martin Garcia5686814%39%$492,789 (Current Through Thursday, Feb. 4) Bob Baffert4587918%53%$500,740 Martin Pedroza4664213%26%$156,390 Santiago Gonzalez12224171120%43%$934,188 STREET FANCY MAIN THREAT TO SONGBIRDPhil D’Amato is not deluding himself when it comes to Street Fancy’s chances of defeating champion Songbird in Saturday’s Grade II, $300,000 Las Virgenes Stakes, but on the other hand, he’s not the meet’s leading trainer by accident.Through 24 racing days, D’Amato held a 14-11 lead over runner-up Doug O’Neill, and had started 19 fewer horses. Making her first start this meet on Saturday will be Street Fancy, a daughter of Street Sense who won the Grade I Starlet at Los Alamitos Dec. 12, closing from seventh in a field of nine to win the mile-and-a-sixteenth race by a length under Mike Smith.The Hall of Fame jockey has ridden Songbird in each of her four victories and will be aboard again on Saturday.“Street Fancy is doing well and we’re going to see where we stand against the best filly in the country,” D’Amato said, speaking in glowing terms of unbeaten Songbird. “She’s a special filly. She might even be the best three-year-old in the country, male or female. But my filly’s not missed a beat since winning the Starlet. I think she’s moved forward and this will be a really good test or gauge to see where we stand.”The field: She’s a Warrior, Flavien Prat, 20-1; Land Over Sea, Mario Gutierrez, 8-1; Street Fancy, Victor Espinoza, 6-1; Jade Princess, Martin Garcia, 10-1; Decked Out, Kent Desormeaux, 20-1; Songbird, Mike Smith, 1-5; and Merirosvo, Drayden Van Dyke, 30-1. APPRENTICE LOPEZ LIVING A DREAM AT SANTA ANITAApprentice jockey David C. (for Charles) Lopez is one of the best-kept secrets in Santa Anita’s riding colony. Through 24 days of the Winter Meet, the 26-year-old native of Puerto Rico who was raised in The Garden State and is “a Jersey boy at heart” ranked third in the standings with 18 wins from 89 mounts, a respectable 20 percent average.It doesn’t appear Lopez will slow down anytime soon, since he doesn’t lose his five-pound apprentice allowance until March 7. The next day, he will ride as a full-fledged journeyman,“Originally, I came out from Monmouth Park,” said Lopez, who is represented by agent J.R. Pegram. “I was raised in Long Branch, right next to Monmouth Park (in Oceanport). I went on a break for a while just galloping horses since 2011, then came back late 2014, early 2015 to Turf Paradise, got going a little, then went to Golden Gate with agent Dennis Patterson, and he got me rolling right off the bat. I think I won three the first week there.“It’s all been clicking. I never dreamed I’d be doing this well at Santa Anita, ever in my life. I just wanted to make a living at any track I was at, and I came here and everything’s been like a dream, really.“I’ve been galloping seven years and racing professionally about a year-and-a-half.”Lopez comes from a family of racetrackers, as does Pegram. David’s father, C.C. Lopez, still rides at Penn National at 53; his brother, Erick Lopez, 28, rides at Golden Gate; and his cousin, Jose Ferrer, rides at Tampa Bay Downs.“My grandfather, Carlos Lopez, also was a jockey,” David points out.Agent Jim Pegram is the father of J.R. and agent Brad Pegram. Owner/breeder Mike Pegram is Jim’s brother.One important horseman Lopez has impressed is leading trainer Phil D’Amato.“I think he’s definitely shown he can compete with the big boys on the Southern California circuit,” said D’Amato, who saddled two winners Thursday.“David’s got great hands and is one of those riders horses just run for. He reminds me of a version of Pat Day. He’s got light hands, finesse, and seems to get better each week.”FINISH LINES: Undefeated Breeders’ Cup Juvenile champion Nyquist will work five furlongs under regular rider Mario Gutierrez at 10:15 a.m. Sunday before the first race at 11 a.m. as he prepares for his three-year-old debut in the Grade II San Vicente Stakes at seven furlongs on Monday, Feb. 15 . . . Bob Baffert on Santa Anita Derby winner Dortmund missing Saturday’s San Antonio: “He’s been training but I lost some time with him. I was trying to get him back, but he’s not quite like the Dortmund we know. Kaleem (owner Kaleem Shah) said whatever you need to do, don’t run him until you’ve got him perfect.” . . . Baffert spent Thursday being escorted through Super Bowl’s Media Center and Radio Row in the Moscone Convention Center in San Francisco under the supervision of NTRA Media Relations Director Jim Mulvihill. Ever the good sport, Baffert even dove into a pit filled with foam squares when he tried to catch a long pass. NTRA posted the video on its Facebook page and suggested he “stick to training.” . . . Multiple stakes winner Toews On Ice worked six furlongs from the gate for Baffert in company Friday for the Southwest Stakes at Oaklawn Park on Feb. 15. The son of Archarcharch was clocked in 1:14.20, while stablemate Speed Check went in 1:13.80 . . . Congratulations to Santa Anita’s popular on-track TV analyst Michelle Yu and her husband, trainer Ryan Hanson, on the birth of their seven-pound, four-ounce baby girl, Olivia Rein Hanson, at 5:10 p.m. Tuesday in Orange County. “She was born on American Pharoah‘s birthday,” Yu pointed out. “Her hobbies include eating and sleeping, both of which she does very well.” . . . Favored in all four lifetime starts, Donworth makes his first start for new trainer Doug O’Neill in Saturday’s San Antonio Stakes since winning the Stanton Stakes by 11 lengths at Delaware Park last June. A 4-year-old colt by Tiznow, out of the Street Cry mare Temple Street, Donworth was purchased by Dennis O’Neill, Doug’s brother and stable consultant, at Keeneland’s breeding stock sale in November for $550,000, making him the sales topper. Donworth was purchased out of the Regis Farms dispersal handled by Three Chimneys for owner Paul Reddam. “We’re very excited,” said Doug when asked about Donworth. “Mario (Gutierrez) worked him for us last week and he loved how he felt. With Dortmund out, we believe he has a good chance to win.” Vladimir Cerin1661238%56%$154,690 Tyler Baze12112211510%40%$669,676 William Spawr2065230%65%$156,362 Mark Glatt4355212%28%$257,960 Mario Gutierrez939161110%39%$528,544 Kristin Mulhall2052125%40%$193,610 J. Keith Desormeaux2351622%52%$147,390last_img read more

WILD DUDE RALLIES FROM OFF PACE TO TAKE GRADE II, $200,000 KONA GOLD STAKES BY ONE LENGTH OVER FAVORED SUBTLE INDIAN; BEJARANO, HOLLENDORFER TEAM FOR 6 ½ FURLONG WIN IN 1:15.10

first_img$75,000 MIZDIRECTION STAKES GOES TO ZIEBARTH HOME-BRED SO SWEETITIZ ARCADIA, Calif. (May 21, 2016)–With a lively pace to run at, Wild Dude skimmed the rail turning for home under Rafael Bejarano and overtook favored Subtle Indian in the final sixteenth of a mile to win Saturday’s Grade II, $200,000 Kona Gold Stakes by one length. Trained by Jerry Hollendorfer, Wild Dude, who broke from the rail, covered 6 ½ furlongs in 1:15.10.In a bizarre turn of events, Subtle Indian, who was riding a four-race winning streak at Oaklawn Park coming into the Kona Gold, broke sharply under regular rider Ramon Vazquez and when recent Los Angeles Stakes winner San Onofre was abruptly pulled up coming out of the seven furlong chute, Subtle Indian found himself on a lonely lead heading to the half mile pole and into the far turn. However, the field compressed approaching the quarter pole and Wild Dude, who was well back early, took command late.The third choice in the wagering in a field of eight older horses at 9-2, Wild Dude paid $11.20, $4.00 and $2.80.“We gave this horse a little time and he’s been training really well,” said Hollendorfer, who also co-owns the 6-year-old Florida-bred horse by Wildcat Heir with Green Smith, Jr. “I didn’t know if the number one post would hurt him, but he got real lucky and got through, so that was what won the race for him. He’s a real nice horse. He’s a millionaire now and we’re very proud of him.With the winner’s share of $120,000, Wild Dude’s career earnings zoomed to $1,095,232. In getting his fifth career Santa Anita win, Wild Dude improved his overall mark to 22-8-5-4.“I knew that (Subtle Indian) would go to the lead,” said Bejarano. “I thought other horses would go with him but I just took my time. I knew my horse would show me a big kick but I had to make sure by the three eighths pole that I had enough room. I let him go in the stretch, had a clean trip and my horse won.”Hammered to favoritism at 4-5, Subtle Indian fought off all challengers a quarter mile out, but couldn’t withstand the late charge of the winner and had to settle for second, a half length in front of Cautious Giant. Subtle Indian paid $2.80 and $2.40.“I think Subtle Indian ran a good race today,” said Vazquez. “He never quits and he tries really hard. I think he is better at six furlongs. Today, at six and a half, he had to go a little more. In this case, the other horse just ran better than mine.”Ridden by Santiago Gonzalez, Cautious Giant out-gamed Coastline late and finished third by a neck. Off at 14-1, Cautious Giant paid $4.20 to show.San Onofre, who was ridden by Edwin Maldonado, sustained two broken sesamoid bones in his right front ankle and had to be euthanized.Fractions on the race were 21.58, 44.37 and 1:08.76. Saturday’s co-feature, the $75,000 Mizdirection Stakes, for fillies and mares 3 and up at 6 ½ furlongs down the hillside turf course, was run immediately following the Kona Gold, as the 10th race on an 11-race card. Taken in gate to wire fashion, it was won by Pamela Ziebarth’s homebred So Sweetitiz, who won by a half length over Miss Double dOro while getting the distance in 1:13.70.Ridden by Mike Smith and trained by Marty Jones, So Sweetitiz, a 4-year-old Kentucky-bred daughter of Grand Slam, was off at 7-1 in a field of eight and paid $17.00, $7.00 and $4.20.“It’s been a process with this filly,” said Jones. “She’s had her ups and downs and she’s been real aggressive. It seems like once we got her on the turf, she started getting confident and doing things the right way. Mike rode a great race. I expected her to be up close, but with Mike you kind of just tell him what she’s like, and he takes care of the rest.”Miss Double d’Oro paid $3.60 and $2.40.Swift Lady, the 9-5 favorite, paid $2.60 to show.First post time for a 10-race card on Sunday at Santa Anita is at 2 p.m. Admission gates open at 11 a.m.last_img read more

Christopher Ram challenges Govt’s “business as usual” approach to contracts

first_imgNo-confidence resolution …seeks order preventing payment of contracts over $15M As the Coalition Government continues its “business as usual” approach following the passage of the no confidence motion back in December, Political Commentator and Attorney-at-Law Christopher Ram has turned to the High Court to stop the awarding and payment of contracts over $15 million.The legal proceedings were filed on Friday by Attorney-at-Law Anil Nandlall on behalf of Ram, and named Attorney General Basil Williams and the Permanent Secretary of the Ministry of the Presidency, Abena Moore, as the respondents.Ram is asking the court to declare, among other things, that any procurement (contract) in excess of $15 million approved by a purported Cabinet after the evening of 21st December, 2018 is unconstitutional, unlawful, null, void, and is of no legal effect; and that the court should issue an order restraining Permanent Secretaries within all Government Ministries from making any payment towards any contracts in excess of $15 million approved by a purported Cabinet after the passage of the no confidence motion.The High Court is also being asked for a declaration to state that “…there exists no Cabinet to review or award any contract which exceeds fifteen million Guyana dollars (G$15,000,000).”It was noted in the court documents seen by Guyana Times that Section 54 (1) of the Procurement Act gives Cabinet the right to review and approve all procurements (contracts) in excess of $15 million. However, Ram pointed out in his grounds for the application that all functions and duties of the Cabinet ceased on December 21, 2018 when the no confidence motion was successfully passed against the Coalition Administration.The Resolution gives effect to Article 106 (6), which states: “The Cabinet including the President shall resign if the Government is defeated by the vote of a majority of all the elected members of the National Assembly on a vote of confidence.”According to the legal documents, the subsequent ruling of acting Chief Justice Roxane George (on January 31 in a case filed by Ram) was that the National Assembly properly, validly and lawfully passed the motion, which immediately effected the resignation of the Cabinet.“…the president and the ministers who constitute the Cabinet [were] compelled to resign their functions in Cabinet but retain their office until elections are held… I have observed that the Cabinet has not complied… and neither the Cabinet nor the President has expressed a public intention to resign or fixed a date prior to or on 21st March, 2019 for the holding of national and regional elections, nor has a resolution supported by no less than two-thirds of the National Assembly determined that elections should be held after an extended period,” Ram outlined in his application to the court.Immediately after the passage of the motion, the Coalition Government had said it would uphold the Constitution, but subsequently took a U-turn, ignoring calls from stakeholders, including the Opposition, to resign.President David Granger has maintained on several occasions that there is no provision in the constitution for a “caretaker” Government. Furthermore, the Government went on to challenge the passage of the motion in the National Assembly back in December.However, the acting Chief Justice found that the no-confidence motion was validly passed, and that Cabinet should have resigned. Government has since appealed this decision, and those matters are expected to come up for hearing at the Appeal Court next week.Meanwhile, following the High Court ruling, the Coalition has been meeting as a ‘Ministerial Plenary’, which is imbued with Cabinet powers, to carry on Government business. In fact, they have noted contracts from the National Procurement and Tender Administration Board (NPTAB) and given their approval for various appointments.This is a move which Opposition Leader Bharrat Jagdeo has called illegal. “They have a ministerial plenary to bypass the Chief Justice’s ruling, which is illegal,” the Opposition Leader has said.Jagdeo had noted, too, that if the People’s Progressive Party, of which he is also the General Secretary, returns to office, then all the actions and decisions of the Coalition Government since December 21 will be reviewed and reversed.last_img read more

Less than two weeks to go until the highly anticipated Letterkenny Busking festival

first_imgThe fifth annual Letterkenny Busking Festival is taking place along Letterkenny’s Main Street on Saturday the 24th of August. Spots are filling up fast for this annual festival so if you would like to take part, we would encourage you to register now.This year’s event is set to be the most competitive yet with various types of performers from Donegal and beyond registered to participate in the competition. But it’s not just about competing. The whole street will be alive with music and performance. This year the Busking festival is taking place during the weekend of the 50th Anniversary of the Letterkenny International Folk Festival so Letterkenny will be full of people who are here for all the various activities and after the busking there will be more live acts on the street.Each act will be in with a chance of winning prizes from the €1000 prize fund but not everyone can win. The acts love the support and can maybe collect a few cents from appreciative audiences. So if you’re out on Saturday 24th August between 11am to 2pm come and see some brilliant acts showcase their talents.Spots are allocated on a first-come-first-served basis, so it is best to pre-register for the festival and all performers will be visited by the judges.This year a special guest will announce the winners at a prize-giving event at McGinley’s Bar at 2.30pm. The winning act will have the chance to perform on stage at the venue. So while you’re shopping in town, head up to the Main Street and feast your eyes and ears on some great performances. The Letterkenny Busking Festival draws a large crowd each year of both spectators and performers.“Bringing music on to the street on a Saturday afternoon always brings a feel-good atmosphere especially in the Summer”, explains Leonard Watson President of Letterkenny Chamber of Commerce that is organising the Busking Festival through its ShopLK Brand.“This year we have a great line up of entertainment building on previous years. With the prize fund on offer we know we’ll have a high standard of acts and we encourage everyone to come out and support the buskers on the day”.“ShopLK is all about enjoying the best shopping experience in Letterkenny and we want our regular customers and visitors to the town to really enjoy what Letterkenny has to offer. This type of event, that is funded through the Retail Promotion initiative from Donegal County Council, makes happy shoppers and creates a real buzz.”Come along on Saturday 24th August to Letterkenny Main Street and see magicians, dancers, street entertainers, trad groups and more celebrating local and national talent. Support our acts and help to bring the main street alive this Summer. To pre-register for the competition and get more information on the competition format, etc, check out our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/letterkennybuskingfestival or alternatively email [email protected] than two weeks to go until the highly anticipated Letterkenny Busking festival was last modified: August 9th, 2019 by Staff WriterShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

Raiders’ Trent Brown denies allegation of domestic violence

first_imgRaiders offensive tackle Trent Brown took to social media Wednesday to deny allegations of a series of physical assaults against the mother of his son earlier this year.The lawsuit filed Monday in civil court accuses Brown of slapping, choking and punching the plaintiff, his ex-girlfriend who is now living in Atlanta, in instances across at least three months this spring and summer, as well as an assault in 2018. Police were called after a June incident in Texas, according to the lawsuit, …last_img read more

SA words spice up OED

first_img7 October 2002What South African words would you include in an English dictionary designed for the region?There are words one hears every day in South Africa: ubuntu, for example, that Nguni word meaning humanity. There are lekgotla (Sesotho) and bosberaad (Afrikaans) – both strategy planning sessions, usually called by government or organisations.Some South African words have entered world usage – “fundi’, from the isiNdebele umfundi (an expert, a teacher) and “trek’, from South African Dutch (a long or arduous journey). Others, perhaps, deserve elevation into “World English’: babelaas (hung-over), from the isiZulu ibhabhalazi; and for those who get themselves into that state, dof, or stupid, from Afrikaans.The South African Concise Oxford Dictionary is the newest in a range of regional dictionaries – there are Canadian, Australian and Indian editions – and the editors had some difficult choices to make. They settled on 1 500 examples of South African English, including words specific to the country as well as those which have meanings in South Africa different from their definitions overseas.“Madam’, for example, might be “a polite form of address for a woman’ elsewhere, but here it’s “the mistress of a household, usually a white woman’, or “an affluent urban white woman’. A “bond’ in South Africa is a “mortgage’ in the US and the UK. And perhaps the best-known example: a South African “robot’ is not a steel-plated humanoid but a traffic light.Less known, but also important, is the use of the comma in figures. The second, South African usage entry under “comma’ is “a mark representing a decimal comma: two comma five metres’ – presumably where many other countries would say “point’.Choices were made by The Dictionary Unit for South African English, a not-for-profit unit affiliated to Rhodes University in Grahamstown and financed partly by the Pan South African Language Board, established by the South African Constitution to promote the country’s 11 official languages as well as other languages used in the country.The unit had a head start: set up in the 1960s by linguistic academics Jean and William Branford, it could rely on their 1978 Dictionary of South African English and the unit’s massive 1996 Dictionary of South African English on Historical Principles.The new dictionary is intended, say the publishers, for the average adult, the student and the professional. It veers from politics (Nepad, Black Consciousness, Gear) to food and drink (witblits, mebos, skottel) to agriculture – or, anyway, a particular crop. “Ganja’ was there already (origin: from Hindi gamja), but the South African edition has added dagga (origin: from Khoikhoi dachab) and “Durban poison’ (cannabis of a particularly potent variety, originating in KwaZulu-Natal, or so says the dictionary).The preference for Mandrax among South African substance abusers – more than in any other country – is also reflected in the dictionary, with one of the definitions of “button’ being “South African informal: a Mandrax tablet’.There is a nod to youth culture, or at least its music. There is nothing especially South African about hip hop (it is, says the dictionary, of US black and Hispanic origin) or rap (of US origin) or kwasa kwasa (“a lively erotic dance originating in central Africa’ as well as “a genre of popular African music’).But kwaito is distinctly home-grown. It is defined as “a style of popular dance music featuring rhythmically recited vocals over an instrumental backing with strong bass lines’. So now you know – and the origin of the name, if not the style, goes deep into Johannesburg culture. “Kwaito’, says the dictionary, comes from the Amakwaito, a group of 1950s gangsters in Sophiatown – and they, in turn, derived their name from an Afrikaans word for angry or vicious: kwaai.Traditional South African culture is highlighted in the new dictionary, with many words from official languages, especially Nguni, included. An imbizo – traditionally “a gathering called by a traditional leader’ but also “a meeting or workshop’ – comes from the isiZulu biza, “call, summon’.Makoti is in (“a young married woman, a bride’, from isiZulu), and indoda (“a man, especially one who has undergone traditional initiation’, from isiXhosa and isiZulu). So are imbongi (a praise singer) and inyanga (“a traditional healer who uses herbal remedies. Compare with sangoma’), as well as sangoma (“a traditional healer or diviner, from isangoma‘).And traditional culture of a different kind is included as well, with many words from Afrikaans, among them deurmekaar (“confused, disorganised’ – like many words, rather more evocative in original than in translation), boeremusiek and boerekos, and everybody’s favourite, lekker, which the dictionary helpfully defines as “tipsy’ as well as “good’ and “pleasant’.Anyone seeking an illustration of the interweaving and interdependency of different South African cultures need look no further than the language.Tsotsitaal, for example, is “an Afrikaans-influenced township patois . typically spoken in Gauteng. Origin from tsotsi + Afrikaans taal ‘language”). And the word tsotsi? It’s “a black urban criminal’, says the entry, and its origin is “perhaps a Sesotho corruption of zoot suit, with reference to the flashy clothes originally associated with tsotsis’. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Amen: Football’s forgotten heroes

first_img29 June 2010With the spotlight on South Africa during the 2010 Fifa World Cup, it’s easy to forget what the game of football is like elsewhere on the continent – played far, far away from glitzy stadiums, often in remote dusty villages with hand-made balls, bare feet and a couple of crooked sticks for goal posts.This is what photographer Jessica Hilltout is trying to show. Her recently launched book, Amen, seeks to draw attention to the spirit of grassroots football in Africa, and the highly dedicated players and teams that follow the game as if it were a religion.MediaClubSouthAfricaFree high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service. “All the people who live and will remain in the shadow of the World Cup deserve to have a light shone on them, not just for their passion for the game, but more so for the fundamental energy and enthusiasm that shines through the way they live,” she says.In this regard her work delves deeper than the sport itself: “This book is not just about football, or indeed about football in Africa. It is a book that tries to capture the beauty and strength of the human spirit. It pays homage to Africa. It is a tribute to the forgotten, to the majority,” Ogilvy & Mather’s creative director, Ian Brower, writes in the introduction.MediaClubSA Gallery: Grassroots African football“Africa is a world like no other … there lies a passion for the festival, a reason to rejoice. These moments are centred around music and football. Often the two go hand in hand. Football is the one activity that costs nothing.”So be itHilltout believes, and has largely based her work on the premise, that in Africa, football is not a religion, but everything a religion should be. “Football is the glue in Africa – it’s a necessity,” she says.“In every little village, no matter how far off the main road, I’d find people playing football at sunrise and sunset. One small village could have as many as five football fields. Waking up at dawn I’d join the players and spectators gathering together on the football field, like we were congregating at a shrine or a temple. There was a true sense of devotion to the game.”The book’s title is also based on this sentiment. “Amen is a four-letter word, the same in every language. It means ‘so be it’,” Hilltout says.“This is very pertinent to Africa in terms of how people accept their fate, with pride and dignity, tough as it may be. It was also the word I heard the most during my trip. When I would leave groups I had been working with, they would say to me: ‘Amen, amen. May this project work. Amen, amen.’”A life on the roadHilltout, who was born in Belgium in 1977, is no stranger to travelling and a life on the road. As a child her family moved around a lot and spent time in the Seychelles, US, Canada, Hong Kong and South Africa.After studying photography in Blackpool, UK, and a brief stint in advertising in Europe, she bought an old Toyota Land Cruiser with her boyfriend in 2002 and made a 15-month trip from Belgium to Mongolia.Following this, the two shipped the car to South Africa’s port of Durban and drove up through Africa, back to Brussels. Throughout the journey, Hilltout kept log books and a photographic record of the regions and places she explored.“Although there was no thread holding my work together at that stage, it was the foundation of what I am trying to express now: highlighting the value of simple, banal things – that stuff that people usually overlook. My first photographic project that held any ground was called the Beauty of Imperfection, which Amen is linked to. It also pays tribute to the imperfect.”Return to AfricaIt was Christmas 2008, back in Europe, when the upcoming 2010 Fifa World Cup sparked the idea of a grassroots football book for Hilltout and her dad, who ended up working with her on the project. “We thought, that with this huge event happening for Africa as a continent, why don’t we show everyone what football means in the little villages, cities and towns across Africa, the places that aren’t going to be the focus tournament?”For the project, Hilltout concentrated on Southern and West Africa, covering about 20 000km between South Africa, Lesotho, Mozambique, Malawi, Ghana, Togo, Benin, Burkina Faso, Niger and Cote d’Ivoire.“There was no real planning for the trip. Nothing had really been pre-arranged. I got on a flight to Cape Town from Brussels, and with me was a Hasselblad with one 80mm lens, 300 rolls of film, a digital camera, my log books, a mini printer and a stock of new footballs. I packed this all into an old VW Beetle that was equipped with a roof rack, three spare tyres, two jerry cans and a higher suspension.”Southern Africa was a natural choice because Hilltout’s dad had the Beetle stored in Cape Town, so she borrowed it for that portion of the trip, but West Africa was a more spontaneous choice.“I decided to go to West Africa because I had never covered that region before … and I knew there were lots of big football countries there, like Ghana and Ivory Coast – so I just flew to Accra. Once I arrived there I bought a Nissan Vanette and kitted it out with four big boxes: one for footballs, one for food and the other two for clothes and film. The whole trip was done on gut-feeling. I would literally arrive in a village … start talking to people … show them my log books with the ideas I had for the project … then off we’d go.“All in all I spent seven months on the road and worked in about 20 different places across the two regions. Each place has a story to it, and that’s covered in the book. There are stories about the guys who fixed boots in the villages, the guy who took in hard-up youngsters and mentored them, and the guy who owns a ‘football cinema’ in West Africa that’s built of mud and sticks, but it can seat 60 fans – and you can even get a fried egg and cup of coffee in there while watching the game!“After this I returned to Europe to put it all together. In total I spent about two years on the project.”Communicating with locals wasn’t too much of a problem for Hilltout, as she speaks English, French and Spanish, but she admits things were a little difficult in Mozambique, as she couldn’t converse in Portuguese. “I drafted a letter and got it translated from Spanish into Portuguese and addressed to the chiefs of the villages I intended visiting.”The contacts she made in the bigger towns, who she says became “her very good friends”, helped her connect with communities in far-off places and translated when only an African language was spoken.“The people with whom I worked were all essential to this project. Once they understood the message I was trying to portray, once I’d gained their trust, they gave me more than I could ever have dreamed. They let me into their villages and homes. They proudly showed me their shoes, their balls, their jerseys.”Trust was a big thing, Hilltout says. “Sometimes it took three days before I took out my camera. I was very aware of the fear of deception, and how these people had perhaps been promised things before. They think people are coming to take – not to give back. And I think this is very well reflected in the history of Africa.”Tired ballsThroughout her trip she exchanged the manufactured footballs she’d brought along for more intricate, home-made ones put together with old socks, pieces of cloth, string, plastic bags and – believe it or not – condoms. Hilltout says that once inflated and covered in a few protective layers, these can keep a ball bouncy for up to three days!“Eventually I found myself with 35 such balls and realised the extent to which they represented the essence of my trip and the heart of the project. I am looking to exchange the balls I collected for equipment for all the players who made this project come to life … so that they can keep on playing the game they love,” she says.UK sports writer and author David Goldblatt talks about this collection extensively in the foreword to Amen: “A few years ago I wrote on the opening page of The Ball is Round: A Global History of Football: ‘Football is available to anyone who can make a rag ball and find another pair of feet to pass to’, as if making a rag ball were a simple matter.“How glib, how foolish, and from a man who had never made a rag ball in his life. I still have not made a rag ball, but I have had the good fortune to see the photographs in this book, Jessica Hilltout’s Amen, and I will never take the manufacture of footballs, from any material, so lightly again.“Among the many things that I have learnt from this book, is that getting or making that ball is no simple task. On the contrary, it is emblematic of the inventiveness, diligence, creativity and single-minded focus of Africans in particular, but of poor communities everywhere,” Goldblatt writes.Exhibitions and book salesThe photographs in Amen are on exhibition in Cape Town, at the Joao Ferreira Gallery, from 15 June to 24 July. A similar exhibition is on in Brussels, Belgium until 18 July.The 208-page hardcover version of Amen is currently available in all major South African book stores for R600 (US$77), and available in magazine format for R190 ($24).Where to from here?“Part one of my campaign is to get the word out about the book, and then the next step is to use the publicity and funds generated from it to make a sustainable contribution to the football communities I photographed in Africa,” Hilltout says. “Of course, I can’t go back and help everyone, but want to focus on two highly committed groups I met in West Africa.”While Hilltout is working to make a positive change in lives of those she photographed, she says her own outlook has changed too.“The life lessons I learned in Africa could never have been learned in Europe. This project has changed me. I’ve begun to understand the true importance of football, which would have been impossible if I hadn’t lived through all the stories in order to capture the pictures. Through football I think I understand a little more about life, or at least a certain way of living.”First published by MediaClubSouthAfrica.com – get free high-resolution photos and professional feature articles from Brand South Africa’s media service.last_img read more

Have Issues With Big Data? Check Out These 5 Data-as-a-Service Startups

first_imgTop Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting Tags:#Data Services#news#web Data is big. By that, we mean that there’s not only a lot of data, but handling all that data is a problem that everyone from small businesses on up to the big boys, like Google and Facebook, has to tackle in one way or another.To help with the problem of handling Big Data, Dealmaker Media has announced a group of startups that it says are “providing answers to all your database problems in unique and innovative ways.”Dealmaker Media, the company behind the Under The Radar conference that brings together a number of early stage, “bleeding-edge technology startups” each year, has put together a list of companies under the title of “Data-as-a-Service.” “Scaling databases is a hard problem,” writes Dealmaker Media Community Manager Clare Jacobson. “In fact, both Google and Facebook have had to build their own solutions to avoid buckling under today’s online and data-thirsty society.”Companies that can’t build their own solutions, writes Jacobson, are left “looking to innovative startups to provide scaling solutions.”So, what companies did Dealmaker pick for their collection of data-as-a-service recommendations?AkibanClustrixHadaptNimbusRethinkDBIf you find yourself, like so many other companies, unable to handle the data deluge, then one of these five companies may be able to save you from developing your own solution. The full blog post offers more details on each of the companies. Related Posts mike melansoncenter_img A Web Developer’s New Best Friend is the AI Wai… Why Tech Companies Need Simpler Terms of Servic… 8 Best WordPress Hosting Solutions on the Marketlast_img read more

PVL men’s: Ateneo wins 6th straight at expense of La Salle

first_imgLATEST STORIES Ateneo chalked up its sixth straight win in the Premier Volleyball League Collegiate Conference after cutting down La Salle, 25-15, 25-20, 25-22, Saturday at Filoil Flying V Centre.The Blue Eagles, who are on their way to the quarterfinals, hiked their record 6-0 record while the Green Spikers hold the fourth spot with a 3-3 card.ADVERTISEMENT BSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Chooks-to-go Pilipinas yields to Palestine in Fiba Asia Champions Cup Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC View comments Bryan Bagunas unloaded 27 points on the sorry defense of UP while Madzlan Gampong and James Natividad combined for 26 points.Wendel Miguel led the Fighting Maroons with 17 points. E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF presidentcenter_img Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City MOST READ Read Next LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Marck Espejo led Ateneo with 16 points while Gian Carlo Glorioso added 11.Arjay Onia and Raymark Woo had eight points apiece to lead La Salle.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutIn the first game, National University tripped University of the Philippines in four sets, 25-13, 24-26, 25-15, 25-17.The Bulldogs improved to 3-2 to stay at third place while the seventh-seeded Fighting Maroons slipped to 1-4. Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:59Sports venues to be ready in time for SEA Games01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Gameslast_img read more